The UK's Film Policy Review Panel is seemingly fed up with the government dilly dallying over Digital Economy Act (DEA) and its anti-piracy proposals, asking for measures to be put in place 'as soon as possible'.

In a week where the US' Stop Online Piracy Act, known as SOPA, has dominated headlines, how the UK is dealing with online piracy has fallen by the wayside – with no news as to when proposals put forward in the Digital Economy Act will be implemented.

For the Film Policy Review Panel, which includes Julian Fellowes, it couldn't come soon enough.

With Blu-ray sales and legitimate downloads not quite filling the gap that's been left by the shrinking DVD market, stemming online piracy is seen as one way to recouping investment.

Reduce significantly

"The Panel recommends that as soon as possible the Government and Ofcom implement the provisions in the Digital Economy Act designed to reduce significantly online infringement of copyright," the report explains.

"We also recommend that the film industry works closely with the Intellectual Property office, Ofcom and the proposed BFI Research and Knowledge function to ensure that evidence on the levels and impacts of copyright infringement and theft on industry is as robust as possible."

Given that the report wants the creation of a BFI Research and Knowledge arm, however, it looks as if there's still a lot to be learned about online piracy in the UK before something concrete can be put in place to prosecute online pirates.

The report continues: "The Panel believes that a focus on tackling websites sharing content unlawfully, while very important, needs to be complemented by other measures as part of an overall strategy designed to reduce significantly infringement and theft."

Piracy is a massive problem for the film industry, where the launch of the DEA can't come soon enough. With the furore surrounding SOPA in the US, though, it's unlikely that we will hear anything concrete from the UK government anytime soon with regards to their piracy plans.

In fact, according to Ofcom, the controversial 'three strike' plan won't come into effect until at least 2013 and that is only if it gets approval.

Via The Register