The best mirrorless camera for 2024: top picks for every budget

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REASONS TO BUY
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Whether you’re learning the ropes or a seasoned pro, the best mirrorless cameras are your route to better images. From entry-level options to top-end flagships, we've reviewed all of the top mirrorless camera models in detail. Based on the results, we've put together this expert guide to help you find the right recommendation.

From our tests, we think the best mirrorless camera for most people is currently the Sony A7 IV, which we also rate as the best camera overall. With a sharp full-frame sensor and fantastic autofocus capabilities, it’s handled almost every shooting scenario during our review. But there are options below for all skill levels and budgets.

Our selection is based on the outcomes of our exhaustive review process. Every camera is extensively tested by our experienced team, to see how it performs in a range of real-world scenarios. We assess factors such as image quality, autofocus performance and ease of use against objective criteria. Each model is scored on its individual merits, then compared to its closest competition. We regularly update our ranked list to include the latest releases, and you'll find more about how we test mirrorless cameras at the bottom of this page.

Written by
Tim Coleman
Written by
Timothy Coleman

Tim is TechRadar's Cameras editor, with over 15 years in the photo and video industry, and most of those in the world of tech journalism. Tim has developed a deeply technical knowledge and practical experience with all things camera related, including mirrorless cameras from the likes of Canon, Sony, Nikon, Fujifilm and Panasonic. He notes, "the mirrorless camera market has never been healthier. From entry-level hybrids to high-res workhorses, competition is fierce across all categories. When putting together this list, we've tried to cater to every kind of photographer."

The quick list

Want to get straight to the best mirrorless camera for your needs? Use our quick round-up below to immediately find a mirrorless camera that suits you – and you can read more about it by jumping to our full write-ups and explanations using the links.

The best mirrorless cameras for 2024

Why you can trust TechRadar We spend hours testing every product or service we review, so you can be sure you’re buying the best. Find out more about how we test.

Below you'll find full write-ups for each of the best mirrorless cameras in our list. We've tested each one extensively, so you can be sure that our recommendations can be trusted.

The best mirrorless camera overall

The Sony A7 IV camera sitting on a wooden bench

The Sony A7 IV (above) is currently our top pick for the title of best overall mirrorless camera. (Image credit: Future)
The best mirrorless camera for enthusiasts

Specifications

Sensor size: Full-frame
Resolution: 33MP
Viewfinder: 3,690K dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1,037K dots
Autofocus: 759-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 10fps
Movies: 4K at 60p
User level: Intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Impressive 33MP sensor
+
Class-leading autofocus
+
Vari-angle screen

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavily cropped 4K footage
-
Complex for beginners
Buy it if:

✅ You need a true all-rounder: If you mix it up between photo and video regularly, the A7 IV is a top mirrorless camera choice.

✅ You're switching from a DSLR: With superb autofocus for photo and video, the A7 IV represents a big upgrade from most full-frame DSLRs.

Don't buy it if:

You shoot a lot of sports and wildlife: The Sony A7 IV can't do it all and there are faster specialist cameras out there for pro action performance.

❌ You need a discreet travel camera: At 1.5lb / 658g and with a sizeable grip, the A7 IV is somewhat hefty compared to other mirrorless cameras.

The Sony A7 IV is a truly modern hybrid camera. It’s overkill for beginners and more expensive than its stills-focused competition, but it’s also a versatile workhorse for anyone who want to shoot a mixture of photos and video. In our tests, we found the A7 IV to have class-leading autofocus skills (although Sony has since launched the pricier A7R V with its new AI autofocus chip and improved subject detection). It's buffer depth proved seemingly endless as well, meaning the camera can almost indefinitely maintain its maximum burst speeds. When using a CFexpress card, it swallowed 9fps for over a minute (or 6-7fps when continuously shooting raw). 

The A7 IV's new 33MP full-frame sensor doesn't dramatically improve image quality over the A7 III (the higher resolution also means fairly prevalent noise above ISO 6400), and there's a heavy crop on 4K footage. A price bump means it no longer occupies the same entry-level price bracket as its popular predecessor either, but upgrades like 10-bit video and a Bionz XR processor make it a much more powerful option. As a complete package, the Sony A7 IV is a solid all-rounder which could be the only mirrorless camera you'll ever need.

Read our in-depth Sony A7 IV review


The best mirrorless camera for beginners

Best camera for photography Canon EOS R10 camers sitting on a wooden bannister

(Image credit: Future)
The best mirrorless camera for most beginners

Specifications

Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 24.2MP
Viewfinder: 2,360K dots
Monitor: 2.95-inch articulated touchscreen, 1,040K dots
Autofocus: 651-area AF
Max continuous shooting rate: 15fps (mechanical), 25fps (electronic)
Video: 4K at 60p
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
Compact and lightweight
+
Modern autofocus abilities

Reasons to avoid

-
No in-body image stabilization
-
Crop on 4K/60p footage
Buy it if:

✅ You're shopping for your first proper camera: From its versatility to its handling, the Canon EOS R10 ticks all the right boxes for beginners buying their first serious camera.

✅ You want an affordable camera for action stills: Despite its mid-range price, the EOS R10 benefits from top-tier autofocus performance and burst shooting speeds.

Don't buy it if:

You want a wide choice of native glass: One of the major drawbacks of the EOS R10 right now is the lack of native lenses for Canon's RF mount.

❌ You mainly record video: Though the R10 can produce nice uncropped 4K/30p video, the lack of audio port and image stabilization mean this isn't a vlogging camera.

There are cheaper mirrorless camera for beginners, but none that can match the versatility of the Canon EOS R10. From our tests, two features set the Canon EOS R10 apart for learners: its 15fps burst shooting rate and powerful subject-tracking autofocus, which operates across 651 AF points. These two features combine to make the R10 a fantastic performer in a range of scenarios, particularly when subjects are fast moving. We found it particularly good at tracking the eyes of subjects.

It’s not a perfect camera for beginners: we found the EVF a little small and also noted the lack of image stabilization, a feature which is offered on rivals like the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV (below). Then again, we also found that the R10’s low weight and deep grip make it a forgiving camera for novices to use. We also noted positively in our review the helpful presence of an AF joystick. The only major drawback is the lack of native lenses currently available for Canon’s RF mount. In all other respects, the R10 is a versatile option for photographers getting started.

Read our in-depth Canon EOS R10 review


The best mirrorless camera for pros

The Sony A7R V camera sitting on a wooden floor

If resolution matters most, the Sony A7R V (above) is a powerhouse with all the pixels any studio or landscape photographer could need. (Image credit: Future)
The best high-resolution workhorse for professionals

Specifications

Sensor size: Full-frame
Resolution: 61MP
Viewfinder: 5,760K dots
Monitor: 3-inch tilt-angle touchscreen, 21,400K dots
Autofocus: 567 PDAF + 425 CDAF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 1fps
Movies: 4K at 30p
User level: Expert
Sensor size: Full-frame
Resolution: 61MP
Viewfinder: 9,440K dots
Monitor: 3.2-inch articulating touchscreen, 2,100K dots
Autofocus: 693-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 10fps
Movies: 8K at 24p
User level: Advanced

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent autofocus
+
Impressive ISO handling
+
Versatile 4-axis touchscreen

Reasons to avoid

-
4K video only up to 60fps
-
Demands high-quality lenses
Buy it if:

✅ You're a landscape, portraits or studio photographer: With class-leading full-frame sensor resolution, image quality is excellent.

✅ You need Sony's best autofocus: AI subject detection AF provides more reliable autofocus for more subjects in more scenarios.

Don't buy it if:

You don’t own the best lenses: A 61MP sensor is unforgiving of any lens deficiencies, so you'll also need expensive high-end pro lenses.

❌ You don’t need 61MP: Do you need 61MP? If not, you'll save a packet by opting for the A7 IV instead. 

At 61MP, the Sony A7R V has the same class-leading resolution as the A7R IV before it. But thanks to a new sensor and powerful Bionz XR processing engine, our review found that the A7R V is a better camera overall. Paired with high-quality optics and up to eight stops of image stabilization, we found it capable of capturing outstanding detail. We found image quality to be excellent when shooting detailed subjects, making the A7R V a fantastic choice for landscape or studio pros. 

In our tests, its AI-powered Real-time Recognition AF wasn’t foolproof, but it could reliably lock onto a range of subjects, working particularly well with people – even in wider scenes. Its articulating touchscreen provides useful flexibility when it comes to framing, while the EVF is as sharp here as on the A7S III. If you want a high-spec full-frame powerhouse and don’t mind paying for it, the A7R V is a serious step up from its predecessor. But if you can’t afford the best glass, want to shoot slow-mo 4K video or simply don’t need such high resolution, you might find better value in the A7 IV.

Read our in-depth Sony A7R V review


The best mirrorless camera for video

Panasonic Lumix S5 II camera on a table with view of the front

A worthy successor to the S5, few mirrorless cameras offer the video features and value found in the Panasonic Lumix S5 II (above). (Image credit: Future)
The best compact full-frame hybrid for video

Specifications

Sensor size: Full-frame
Resolution: 24.2MP
Viewfinder: 2,360K dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1,840K dots
Autofocus: 225-area AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 7fps
Movies: 6K at 30p
User level: Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Effective image stabilization for handheld work
+
Phase detection AF for video

Reasons to avoid

-
1.5x crop on slow-mo, wide-angle 4K video
-
AF subject detection simpler than rivals
Buy it if:

✅ You want to accelerate your video prowess: The S5 II is feature-packed for video, with open gate 6K 30p recording, a range of codecs, and superb image stabilization. 

✅ You make video for social, too: The S5 II's uncropped video is perfect for multi-aspect videos for social.

Don't buy it if:

You love slow-motion video: The S5 II's 4k / 60p video incurs a 1.5x crop, which is a little restricting for wide angle slow motion video.

❌ You love a good-looking camera: Design aesthetics are subjective, but we think the S5 II’s DSLR style is dated. 

The Panasonic Lumix S5 II is a worthy successor to one of our favorite video cameras, the S5. Like the S5, the S5 II is ticketed as a hybrid, but video is where it excels. In our tests, we found its 6K/30p footage rich and detailed, with wide dynamic range. Its video chops are bolstered by 10-bit recording across almost all resolutions, plus the ability to record uncropped footage using the sensor’s full 3:2 aspect ratio – useful for cropping content. We also found it sturdy yet comfortable to handle during testing. Happily, its compact design doesn’t compromise the physical controls.

The S5 II is Panasonic’s first mirrorless camera with phase detection AF for video. Combined with effective image stabilization, we found it produces sharp, stable video even when shooting handheld, although the 1.5x crop on 4K/60p video is a shame. The Panasonic Lumix GH6 is a more travel-friendly video powerhouse with a Micro Four Thirds sensor, while serious videographers will be drawn by the Lumix S5 IIX. Nevertheless, the S5 II is a fantastic full-frame hybrid for high-quality video.


The best crop-sensor mirrorless camera

The Canon EOS R7 camera sitting on a stone step

(Image credit: Future)
The best APS-C mirrorless camera from Canon

Specifications

Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 32.5MP
Viewfinder: 2,360K dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch tilt-angle touchscreen, 1,620K dots
Autofocus: 5,915-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 15fps (mechanical shutter), 30fps (electronic)
Movies: 4K at 60p
User level: Hobbyist / professional

Reasons to buy

+
Speedy burst shooting
+
Impressive autofocus
+
Great value

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited native lenses
-
No 4K/120p video mode
Buy it if:

✅ You're a wildlife or sports photographer on a budget: Canon's subject-tracking and eye-recognition autofocus is game-changing for enthusiast action photographers.

✅ You also want a compact-sized all-rounder: The EOS R7 with 18-150mm kit lens is a compact package ideal for travelling.

Don't buy it if:

You’re want decent lens choice: Rival Sony and Fujifilm APS-C mirrorless systems have a superior selection of lenses.

❌ You need full-frame: There are lots of advantages to APS-C sensors especially for wildlife, but many people will simply desire a full-frame camera.

The Canon EOS R7 is like one of the camera giant's full-frame EOS R cameras, only with a smaller APS-C sensor. For the price, it's impressively powerful, particularly if you're fan of shooting wildlife or sports scenes. That's because it boasts 15fps burst speeds (or 30fps if you switch to the electronic shutter). Our tests found that the EOS R7 can indeed hit these speeds, though you don't get the deep buffers found on full-frame siblings like the EOS R6, so it can't sustain those speeds for quite as long.

Beyond rattling off frames of speeding animals, the EOS R7 offers comfortable handling, Canon's latest subject-tracking autofocus system and and dual UHS-II card slots, making it a camera that will also tempt pro EOS R series fans as a second body. The only downside? Canon has so far only made two native lenses for the EOS R7's APS-C sensor. More should be en route, though, and you can always mount existing RF lenses or adapt older EF lenses from Canon's DSLRs while you wait.

Read our in-depth Canon EOS R7 review


The best retro mirrorless camera

The Nikon Z fc camera on a park bench

For fans of retro film camera looks, the Nikon Zfc (above) is a near-irresistible mirrorless camera with modern shooting power. (Image credit: Future)
The best mirrorless camera with retro style

Specifications

Sensor size: APS-C CMOS
Resolution: 20.9MP
Viewfinder: 0.39-inch EVF, 2.36 million dots
Monitor: 3.2-inch tilt-angle touchscreen, 1.04 million dots
Autofocus: 209-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 11fps
Movies: 4K (UHD) at 30fps
User level: Intermediate/expert

Reasons to buy

+
Stunning design
+
Handy vari-angle touchscreen
+
Good value

Reasons to avoid

-
Lack of native lenses
-
No UHS-II card support
Buy it if:

✅ You love old school cameras: Nikon fan or not, we can agree the Nikon Zfc is a retro-chic beauty.

✅ You want retro style with modern smarts: If you tuck the modern vari-angle touch screen away altogether you can pretend the Z fc is from a bygone era.

Don't buy it if:

You want a bullet-proof body: Inspired by the super-tough Nikon FM2 analog camera design, the Z fc is a casual camera with entry-level build quality.

❌ You need a decent choice of native APS-C mirrorless lenses: Nikon is yet to fill out the lens range for it's APS-C mirrorless cameras, although there is at least the 24mm f/1.7 prime lens now.

The Nikon Z fc is a gloriously retro take on the Nikon Z50, the camera giant's other crop-sensor mirrorless camera. It packs the same specs as the Z50 into a body that's inspired by the Nikon FM2 from the early 1980s – and the combination is a triumph for casual shooters who want a fun camera for travel and everyday shooting. It might lack a weather-proof build and the large grip seen on the Nikon Z50, but we found the Z fc to be a delight to shoot with. 

Its competitive specs, which include a 20.9MP sensor, the ability to shoot 4K/30p video, and continuous AF tracking for people and animals, are also borne out in reality. The only downside? A lack of native lenses. If a wide range of APS-C lenses is important to you, then Fujifilm's X-series is a good alternative – but otherwise, the Nikon Z fc is a glorious mix of old and new. That said, if you have a little extra cash and are looking for a more rugged, full-frame retro camera, then the pricier Nikon Zf is the one for you. 

Read our in-depth Nikon Z fc review


The best value mirrorless camera

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV mounted in a tripod outside in a garden

Olympus may not longer make new cameras, but the E-M10 Mark IV (above) remains a superb option for beginners. (Image credit: Future)
The best value mirrorless camera for beginners

Specifications

Sensor size: Micro Four Thirds
Resolution: 20.3MP
Viewfinder: 2,360K dots
Monitor: 3-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,037K dots
Autofocus: 121-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 15fps
Movies: 4K at 30p
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
Capable stabilized sensor
+
Compact and accessible

Reasons to avoid

-
No microphone input
-
Autofocus isn’t cutting edge
Buy it if:

✅ You'll invest in a range of lenses: Micro Four Thirds has been around for ages and there's a huge selection of excellent and affordable lenses.

✅ You like to shoot handheld: The E-M10 IV boasts class-leading image stabilization, which can keep your handheld shots sharp at slow shutter speeds.

Don't buy it if:

You also shoot video: The E-M10 Mark IV lacks phase-detection autofocus, a mic input and USB-C port, while video  is capped at 4K/30p, meaning no slow motion recording.

❌ You're looking for the best autofocus: The E-M10 Mark IV's specs are surpassed by some rivals, especially its autofocus chops.

On paper, the E-M10 Mark IV is an easy camera to overlook. But in reality, it’s one of the best cameras for beginners who are mainly focused on stills rather than video. It might lack advanced features such as phase-detection autofocus or a microphone input, but it ticks all of the key boxes for beginners. A compact body and approachable button layout make it an accessible upgrade for smartphone photographers, as do Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity. 

In our tests, we found that the 20.3MP sensor to be plenty capable enough to capture consistently attractive images, while in-body image stabilization works a treat for shooting snaps at slower shutter speeds. The 121-point contrast detection autofocus won’t make headlines, but it does a decent job of consistently tracking faces and eyes. Add classic styling to the mix, plus a handy flip-down touchscreen and an Advanced Photo mode that makes it easy to experiment with complex techniques and the Mark IV proves itself a well-rounded beginner mirrorless option.

Read our in-depth Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV review


The best pro hybrid mirrorless camera

Nikon Z8 camera in the hand

A Nikon Z9 in more compact packaging, the Nikon Z8 (above) could be all the mirrorless camera most Nikon fans need. (Image credit: Future)
The best full-frame hybrid for professionals

Specifications

Sensor size: Full-frame
Resolution: 45.7MP
Viewfinder: 3,690K dots
Monitor: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 2,100K dots
Autofocus: 493-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 120fps
Movies: 8K at 30p
User level: Advanced

Reasons to buy

+
Same stacked sensors as the Z9
+
Smaller and cheaper than the Z9

Reasons to avoid

-
Lower-resolution EVF than rivals
-
Image stabilization is only OK
Buy it if:

✅ You're ready to switch from your Nikon D850
The Z8 is a natural mirrorless successor to the D850 DSLR with plenty of new tech to make the upgrade worthwhile.

✅ You want on camera that does it all: The Nikon Z8 is highly efficient in any scenario; landscape photography, wildlife videos, whatever you can think of.  

Don't buy it if:

You shoot long video clips: The Z8's video record times are shorter than the Z9 in hot conditions.

❌ You want class-leading detail in your photos: 45MP is plenty enough for most people and most situations, but the rival Sony A7R V's 61MP resolution is better.

The Nikon Z8 doesn’t do much that we haven’t already seen in the Z9. But as a smaller, cheaper version of our camera of the year 2022, it’s one of the most capable mirrorless models you can buy right now. In testing, we found it every bit the capable hybrid camera, producing pin-sharp stills courtesy of its 45.7MP full-frame sensor, with fantastic 8K video to match. It doesn’t rival the 61MP resolution of the Sony A7R V, but the pixel difference makes the Nikon Z8 twice as fast. 

The Nikon Z8 follows the Z9 in excluding a mechanical sensor entirely, and reaps the performance rewards. During our review, we found 20fps burst shooting more than enough to capture action-packed moments, but the Z8 can go all the way to 120fps if you’re happy with 11MP output. We did find battery life a little limited in testing, and in-body image stabilization was simply fine. But by squeezing almost all of those flagship features into a significantly smaller body, at a lower price, we think the Nikon Z8 offers a recipe that will make more sense for most people than the Z9.

Read our in-depth Nikon Z8 review


The best medium format mirrorless camera

The Hasselblad X2D 100C camera front with no lens revealing image sensor

The Hasselblad X2D 100C is an extravagant option that pushes what medium format can do (Image credit: Future)

9. Hasselblad X2D 100C

The best medium format camera you can buy

Specifications

Sensor size: Medium-format
Resolution: 100MP
Viewfinder: 5,760K dots
Monitor: 3.6-inch tilting touchscreen, 2,360K dots
Autofocus: 294-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 3.3fps
Movies: N/A
User level: Professional

Reasons to buy

+
Stunningly designed and built
+
Exceptional image quality

Reasons to avoid

-
No video modes
-
Middling battery life
Buy it if:

✅ You love simple Scandi design: Hasselblad X System cameras are refreshingly simple and slick.

✅ Color quality is important to you: In addition to its mega 100MP resolution, the X2D's color rendition and dynamic range is outstanding. 

Don't buy it if:

You shoot action: Hasselblad's best autofocus yet and 3.3fps burst shooting is still bettered by 10-year-old DSLRs.

❌ You want a feature-packed camera: The X2D's strength is single-shot photography quality. It doesn't even record video.

While it’s very much a camera for photography purists, the Hasselblad X2D 100C is also the most versatile and accessible Hasselblad to date. It squeezes a medium format sensor into a stunning body that we found surprisingly compact and comfortable to handle. We also appreciated the convenience of its built-in 1TB of SSD storage. That’s not to say it doesn’t occupy a narrow niche: there’s no video, burst shooting tops out at 3.3fps, and even with speed enhancements, its autofocus still lags far behind the latest mirrorless models. And if you like telephoto lenses, there's no obvious option from Hasselblad.

Yet despite these drawbacks, we found its manageable form factor and tilt-angle touchscreen made it usable in the real world, while its in-body image stabilization – a first for Hasselblad – eliminated the need for a tripod. Its 100MP sensor can capture pin-sharp stills, while its leaf shutter setup permits greater use of wide apertures with flash portraits. Color rendition and dynamic range are outstanding, too. The X2D is right up there with our favorite medium format cameras. 

Read our in-depth Hasselblad X2D 100C review


The best mirrorless hybrid for beginners