Best video camera 2022: the finest choices for filmmakers and videographers

The Panasonic Lumix GH6, one of the world's best video cameras, on an orange background
(Image credit: Future)
Editor's note: November 2022

In these financially challenging times, not everyone can afford to splash out on the latest mirrorless or cinema camera. Fortunately, we're entering the sales season, with the Black Friday deals already starting to arrive – and these could serve up some video camera bargains.

The best Black Friday camera deals probably won't arrive until nearer the official day of November 25, but we are already seeing some choice discounts arrive on Panasonic cameras like the GH6 and GH5 Mark II. 

It's also worth bearing in mind that it's a traditionally great time for discounts on lenses – so even if you already have a camera, you could give it a serious upgrade with some new video-friendly glass like a wide-angle prime.

Mark Wilson, Cameras editor

Whether you’re shooting for YouTube or recording a feature film, the best video cameras will upgrade any production. When it comes to making movies, the top cameras in 2022 shoot crisp video in a range of conditions. They also offer a range of resolution, frame rate and bit depth options for editing flexibility. Luckily, there are also great options at a range of prices. 

We’ve designed this guide to help you choose your ideal video camera. Our expert team has reviewed all of the top options, to confirm how well each one fulfills our testing criteria. Besides outright quality, we look at aspects such as connectivity and handling to determine which cameras deserve a place in our regularly updated list. And we don’t focus only on the most expensive models.

That’s illustrated by the Panasonic Lumix GH6, which is our current favorite. While it’s pricier and heavier than other Lumix G models, it offers incredible performance for a lot less than many full-frame alternatives. Despite its compact proportions, it can shoot 5.7K/60p video with unlimited recording times, while offering an array of shooting options.

Whether you’re a fledgling filmmaker or a seasoned cinematographer, you’ll find video cameras to suit a spectrum of skill levels. We’ve covered full-frame flagships and rugged action cams, as well as smaller tools for shooting on the go. If the latter is what you’re after, we recommend the excellent Sony ZV-E10, which combines compact dimensions with comprehensive skills at a reasonable price. It’s also one of the best vlogging cameras you can buy.

If you’re not sure how to choose, there are helpful tips to consider at the bottom of this article, which should prove useful when making your selection. You’ll also find direct links beneath each recommendation which take you straight to the best deals available today. And if you’re looking to land a seasonal discount, be sure to bookmark our round-up of the best Black Friday camera deals.

The best video cameras in 2022:

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The Panasonic GH6 camera sitting on a tripod

(Image credit: Future)
The all-round camera for filmmakers

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Micro Four Thirds
Resolution: 25.2MP
Lens: Micro Four Thirds
Viewfinder: 3.68m-dot EVF
Monitor: 1.84m-dot articulating screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 75fps (electronic), 14fps (mechanical)
Movies: 5.7K at 60fps
User level: Intermediate / expert

Reasons to buy

+
Huge range of video options
+
Versatile screen and great handling

Reasons to avoid

-
Larger and heavier than the GH5 II
-
Autofocus still lags behind the best

Panasonic’s GH6 puts the Micro Four Thirds format back on top for filmmakers and amateur videographers. Offering a massive array of color profiles, resolutions, frame rates and 10-bit video modes, there’s an incredible level of creative potential available from the GH6 – especially as there are no recording limits, even when recording in 5.7K at 60fps.

Full-frame sensors might perform better in low light, but the more compact Micro Four Thirds setup allows the Panasonic GH6 to be smaller, lighter and more affordable than its bigger siblings. The smaller sensor can also be stabilized more effectively. We loved the thoughtful design, superb handling and a rugged magnesium alloy frame - all of which means the GH6 shapes up as a compelling option for videographers.

It is pricier than other Lumix G models, most notably the GH5 II. It also lags behind rivals on autofocus performance; if you need the fastest, most accurate AF system, another brand might suit you better. But if video is your bread and butter, the Panasonic GH6 is a beast of a machine in impressively portable packaging.

Panasonic GH5 Mark II vlogging camera on a tripod

(Image credit: Future)
The best budget-friendly video camera

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Micro Four Thirds
Resolution: 20.3MP
Lens: Micro Four-Thirds
Viewfinder: 3.68m dots
Monitor: 1.84m-dot articulated screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 12fps
Movies: 4K at 60fps
User level: Beginner/intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Strong all-round video quality
+
Compact, lightweight and sturdy
+
Built-in wireless live streaming

Reasons to avoid

-
Small sensor size
-
DFD AF isn’t the most reliable

The original Panasonic GH5 was possibly the first mirrorless camera that did both 4K video and stills photography well, but its successor arrives at a time when plenty of rival models share that trait – and doesn’t offer much in the way of an upgrade.

The Mark II stands out by virtue of its built-in wireless live streaming capabilities, which at the time of writing you won’t find on any other mirrorless camera, but its general video skills remain strong: 10-bit 4:2:2 footage can be recorded internally or externally, there’s a wide variety of frame rate options and various anamorphic video resolutions supported and Panasonic’s flat V-Log profile gives you 12 stops of dynamic range to play with in post-production.

That the GH5 Mark II includes all this in a compact, lightweight and weatherproof body with effective IBIS makes it all the more impressive. Its sensor may be small (which does limit its low-light capabilities), but our tests revealed it to be a mighty video camera. Consider it if you don't have the budget (or perhaps the need) for the GH6.

Sony A7S III on a wooden surface

(Image credit: Future)
The best premium video camera

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full Frame
Resolution: 12.1MP
Lens: Sony E
Viewfinder: 9.44MP EVF
Monitor: 1.44m-dot articulating screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Movies: 4K at 120fps
User level: Intermediate / expert

Reasons to buy

+
Superb low-light performance
+
Fully articulated touchscreen
+
No overheating problems

Reasons to avoid

-
No 6K or 8K
-
Low resolution for stills

The most video-focussed of all Sony’s A-series cameras, the Sony A7S III’s back-illuminated full-frame sensor delivers best-in-class 4K video in low-light situations. With 15 stops of dynamic range and an expandable ISO of 40 to 409,600, not to mention an effective in-body image stabilization system, we discovered in our review that it’s able to capture beautiful-looking videos in conditions that would thwart most of its competitors.

The sensor’s relatively low resolution of 12.1MP does rule out 6K and 8K recording (and limits detail for stills shooting), but the powerful Bionz XR processor allows 4K footage to be recorded at up to 120fps for smooth slow-motion playback; Full HD can be recorded at up to 240fps. The full-size HDMI output, class-leading autofocus, support for several picture profiles (including the popular S-Log) and ability to record long clips (30 minutes-plus) with no overheating issues are all signs of a serious video cameras.

In terms of usability and quality of life, we felt that the A7S III boasts many improvements over its predecessors. The touchscreen is now fully articulated and able to flip, boosted battery life lets you capture over 75 minutes of 4K footage on a single charge and the simplified UI is much more intuitive.

The Fujifilm X-H2S camera sitting on a wooden bench

(Image credit: Future)
One of the most powerful all-rounders for stills and video

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: APS-C
Resolution: 26MP
Lens: X-mount
Viewfinder: 5.76m-dot EVF
Monitor: 3.0-inch, 1.62m-dot articulating screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 40fps (electronic), 15fps (mechanical)
Movies: 6.2K at 30fps
User level: Intermediate / expert

Reasons to buy

+
Video powerhouse
+
Seriously fast stacked sensor

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricier than many full-frame cameras
-
Not many video-centric lenses

The Fujifilm X-H2S is one of the most powerful hybrid cameras you can buy. It’s expensive for an APS-C camera and lacks the retro charm of recent Fuji models. But it also delivers pro-quality video performance without the full-frame bulk. Pairing a stacked CMOS sensor with Fuji’s X-Processor 5 gives it a huge spec sheet boost: you can record 6.2K/30p video internally with 4:2:2 10-bit color depth. Grapple with the endless menus and you’ll find countless profiles for color grading in post, while using a CFexpress card also unlocks three Apple ProRes codecs. 

With no recording limits, we were able to shoot in 4K for more than two hours before the battery gave out. While we were disappointed by the 1.29x crop on 4K/120p footage, video quality otherwise proved clean and crisp. And though autofocus isn’t class-leading, subject-tracking is nevertheless impressive. Other familiar features only sweeten the deal, including in-body image stabilization and an articulating touchscreen. For filmmakers, the Fujifilm X-H2S is fantastically capable but objectively overkill. But if you want an outstanding video camera that also has superlative stills abilities, no other APS-C camera can match its skill set.

Panasonic Lumix S5 on a wooden surface

(Image credit: Future)
A small and relatively affordable full-frame all-rounder

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full-Frame
Resolution: 24.2MP
Lens: L mount
Viewfinder: 2.36m-dot EVF
Monitor: 1.84m-dot articulated screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 7fps
Movies: 4K at 60fps
User level: Intermediate / Expert

Reasons to buy

+
Small for a full-frame camera
+
Wide range of video options

Reasons to avoid

-
No full-size HDMI output

Panasonic’s smallest and lightest full-frame camera, the Lumix S5 looks more akin to a Micro Four Thirds model than the beefy Lumix S1 with which it shares a sensor. We found that the portability makes it a great option for run-and-gun filming (provided you stick with smaller, lighter L lenses), and the 5-axis IBIS comes in handy here too.

Video users have access to a vast array of options, resolutions and frame rates, including 4K 10-bit internal recording and V-Log (with its 14 stops of dynamic range). The fully articulated screen and option to shoot uncropped 4K at 30fps are welcome touches which we appreciated during our time with it.

On the downside, the HDMI output is of the micro variety and the DFD autofocus setup isn’t the quickest, but neither feels like a dealbreaker.

Panasonic Lumix S1H in someone's hands

(Image credit: TechRadar)
Netflix approves of this 6K beast – as do we

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full Frame
Resolution: 24.2MP
Lens: L-Mount
Viewfinder: 5.76m dots
Monitor: 2.33m-dot articulating screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 9fps
Movies: 6K at 24fps
User level: Intermediate / expert

Reasons to buy

+
Superb 6K 10-bit video capture
+
Strong low-light performance
+
Good IBIS

Reasons to avoid

-
No raw video capture
-
Bulky build
-
AF performance not the best

The smallest, cheapest camera to be approved by Netflix for its original productions, the S1H is a hugely powerful full-frame model designed for demanding creators. While it can’t match the Sony A7S III for frame rate, it can record at 6K resolution at 24fps (as well as 4K at up to 60fps), giving it the edge when it comes to sheer detail.

In Panasonic’s V-Log or V-Gamut picture profiles, the S1H delivers 14 stops of dynamic range, while its All-I mode results in a staggering 400Mbps bitrate. Our tests showed that the Dual Native ISO and large sensor size makes low-light shooting a breeze – although the Sony A7S III maintains an edge here. There’s superb in-body image stabilization to help out when shooting handheld, but do be aware that the S1H is larger and heavier than many of its contemporaries, so long handheld sessions aren’t advised.

Autofocus is a mixed bag: in good lighting the Depth From Defocus (DFD) system works well, but in dimmer conditions it feels a little slow. Still, if you can live with its minor quirks, the S1H is capable of producing stunningly sharp and detail-rich footage.

The Nikon Z9 camera on a wooden table

(Image credit: Future)
An 8K powerhouse with video upgrades on the way

Specifications

Sensor size: CMOS
Resolution: 45.7MP
Viewfinder: 3,690K dots
Monitor: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,040K dots
Autofocus: 493-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 20fps (RAW), 30fps (JPEG)
Movies: 8K at 60p
User level: Expert

Reasons to buy

+
Class-leading video skills
+
Rock solid build quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Some features need firmware update
-
Bulkier and heavier than rivals

Nikon’s new full-frame flagship is a landmark model: it’s the first pro camera to ship with no mechanical shutter. And while its bulky, rugged DSLR styling felt comfortably familiar, our testing confirmed that the Z9 is a truly modern machine. 

One of a select few cameras that can record 8K/30p footage, the Z9 also offers filmmakers a candy store of capabilities. Besides 4K slow-mo at 120fps, it serves up sharp oversampled 4K video, together with lengthy 125-minute recording times and reliable Eye AF tracking. We found that image quality from the 45.7MP stacked CMOS sensor was superlative, with huge cropping potential, aided by superb image stabilization. 

And it’s only going to get better: a firmware upgrade is set to unlock a host of recording skills later this year, including the option to shoot raw 8K/60p video internally – a first for any mirrorless camera. Its abilities might be overkill for many, but with rapid performance, a two-way tilting touchscreen and video enhancements already inbound, the Z9 is a seriously impressive, competitively priced tool for professional videographers.

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K Pro in a garden

(Image credit: Future)
A professional workhorse at a great price

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: APS-C
Resolution: 21.2MP
Lens: Canon EF
Viewfinder: 3.68m dots
Monitor: Full HD tilt screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: n/a
Movies: 6K at 60fps
User level: Expert

Reasons to buy

+
Cheap for a professional cinema camera
+
Built-in ND filters
+
Lightweight build

Reasons to avoid

-
Not for novices
-
No IBIS

It may not actually fit in your pocket, but Blackmagic Design’s Pocket Cinema Camera 6K Pro does put real filmmaking power in a small, lightweight and relatively affordable package. 

We found in our review that you shouldn't expect the luxurious quality-of-life features you’d get with a mirrorless model from one of the big names: there’s no IBIS here, the autofocus moves like treacle (forget about tracking AF) and stills capabilities are essentially non-existent. The viewfinder is an optional add-on. That’s because everything’s been stripped back in favor of pro-quality performance, and because the camera is aimed at people who make films and have the necessary gear or knowhow to capture steady shots and pull focus properly.

Image quality is stupendous, we discovered, (12-bit raw or ProRes footage can be recorded), the popular Canon EF lens mount is supported and there are three built-in ND filters to aid filming in tricky lighting conditions, while the mini-XLR inputs mean high-quality audio recording is simple.

Canon EOS R5 sitting on a wall

(Image credit: Future)
Canon’s best ever stills camera can also impress with video

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full Frame
Resolution: 45MP
Lens: RF mount
Viewfinder: 5.76m dots
Monitor: 2.1m-dot articulating screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 20fps
Movies: 8K at 30fps
User level: Intermediate / Expert

Reasons to buy

+
Fantastic AF
+
Effective IBIS
+
Stellar stills performance

Reasons to avoid

-
Recording limits due to overheating
-
Expensive

Canon’s prosumer mirrorless camera is hugely powerful. With a 45MP full-frame sensor, supremely sticky autofocus, solid IBIS, great battery life and the ability to shoot continuously at 20fps, we think the EOS R5 is the best camera stills Canon has ever made.

For video shooters, an out-and-out recommendation is a little trickier. For starters, while the R5 offers a lot of higher-end video modes (8K ALL-I or RAW, 4K at 120fps, 10-bit 4K HEVC), they require an expensive CFexpress card. We also found that the more intensive video modes also cause the camera to overheat, not only limiting recording time but requiring a long cool-down before you can record again.

If you can work within these limits, you’ll find the R5’s video quality to be excellent: pin-sharp with bags of flexibility when it comes to colour grading. If the price puts you off, consider sister camera the Canon EOS R6, which has a 20.6MP sensor and is limited to 4K video, but costs considerably less.

Nikon Z6 II on a wooden surface

(Image credit: Future)
The all-rounder offers great handling and build quality

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full Frame
Resolution: 24.5MP
Lens: Z mount
Viewfinder: 3.69m dots
Monitor: 2.1m-dot tilting screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 14fps
Movies: 4K at 60fps
User level: Intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Best-in-class build quality
+
Excellent image quality
+
5-axis IBIS

Reasons to avoid

-
Screen is tilt only
-
No internal 10-bit recording

This is the second edition of Nikon’s full-frame mirrorless model, and the company has both worked out some of the original’s kinks and made modest improvements in key areas. We found that the result is a versatile camera that does well with both stills and video, although users should note that video performance here is pretty much identical to the original Z6 (which you should be able to pick up for a lot less).

The Z6 II’s handling and build quality are superb, making it a joy to use, although videographers may well bemoan the fact that the screen just tilts rather than being fully articulated. The camera body is quite lightweight for its specs, but rugged and weatherproofed, making it a good choice for anyone planning long shoots out and about.

Following a firmware update, 4K video can be recorded at up to 60fps, while Full HD can be recorded at up to 120fps for slow-motion playback. 10-bit HLG footage can be recorded too, but only externally – so bear that in mind if you want to record in the best quality.

Sony A1 on a wooden surface

(Image credit: Future)
A powerhouse that pushes the boundaries – at a price

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full Frame
Resolution: 50.1MP
Lens: E mount
Viewfinder: 9.44m dots
Monitor: 1.44m-dot tilting screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 30fps
Movies: 8K at 30fps
User level: Expert

Reasons to buy

+
Wealth of video options
+
Excellent image quality
+
Superb AF system

Reasons to avoid

-
Extremely pricey
-
Non-articulated screen

A rare pairing of speed and resolution, Sony’s flagship camera comes with a price to match its ambition. It wants to be the best consumer camera in the world, quite frankly – and it might well be, but you’ll need to part with what might be several months’ salary to own one.

Able to record 8K video at 30fps, 4K at 120fps and Full HD at 240fps, with a huge host of other options like 10-bit color depth, S-Log and S-Cinetone available, this is a videographer’s dream. It can even output 16-bit raw footage to an external recorder, should 10-bit be insufficient for your requirements. Annoyingly, the screen merely tilts rather than faces all directions, while the menu system feels confusingly labyrinthine.

With an imperious autofocus system, effective IBIS and the sharpest OLED viewfinder on the market, the A1 is also a world-class stills camera able to shoot continuously at 30fps. If you’re just shooting video, we think the Sony A7S III is a much cheaper and almost-as-effective alternative.

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K on a tripod

(Image credit: Future)
A great cinema camera for under a grand

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Four-Thirds
Resolution: 8MP
Lens: Micro Four-Thirds
Viewfinder: n/a
Monitor: Full HD fixed screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: n/a
Movies: 4K at 60fps
User level: Expert

Reasons to buy

+
Professional-level video standards
+
Great price
+
Small and light

Reasons to avoid

-
Light on features
-
No articulating screen

Don’t let the plasticky utilitarian design or lack of 'mod cons' like in-body image stabilization, a viewfinder or tracking autofocus fool you: the Pocket Cinema Camera 4K is a pro-level piece of filmmaking gear with an affordable price tag.

With a wide range of connectivity (including full-size HDMI, mini-XLR and a DC power connector), a huge (and sadly non-articulated or tilting) 16:9 touchscreen and the ability to shoot ProRes or raw footage in a variety of resolutions and frame rates, this has almost everything a serious videographer needs. Just add a lens (it uses the same MFT mount as Panasonic and Olympus cameras) and some fast storage and you’re good to go.

It’s not perfect – we found the stills performance to be quite rudimentary and the battery life is nothing to get excited about – but the image quality alone makes Blackmagic’s entry-level option a better video performer than most high-end mirrorless models.

The front of the Sony ZV-E10 showing its image sensor

(Image credit: Future)
A compact 4K vlogging cam with interchangeable lenses

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: APS-C
Resolution: 24.2MP
Lens: Sony E
Viewfinder: N/A
Monitor: 3-inch fully articulating touchscreen, 921K dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 11fps
Movies: 4K at 30fps
User level: Beginner / enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Compact and lightweight
+
Fully articulating screen

Reasons to avoid

-
Rolling shutter when panning
-
No 4K/60p video mode

Want a capable video tool that fits in your pocket? Sony’s ZV-E10 isn’t perfect, but it’s an impressive portable package for videographers. Despite its compact, lightweight build, the ZV-E10 packs a 24MP APS-C sensor that can shoot sharp 4K footage (albeit limited to 30fps) and Full HD slow-mo at up to 120fps. Mic-in and headphone ports give welcome audio flexibility, while the Multi-Interface hot shoe mount means you can readily accessorize your setup. 

We felt that the fully articulating touchscreen also makes framing a cinch, and UVC/UAC computer connectivity unlocks easy live-streaming. Besides the lack of a 4K/60p setting, its major limitation is rolling shutter when panning. This jelly effect puts paid to quick pans, which will discourage run-and-gun recorders. If you can live with this, Sony’s ZV-E10 remains an affordable video-focused hybrid.

The GoPro Hero 11 Black action camera sitting on a wooden platform

(Image credit: Future)

14. GoPro Hero 11 Black

The best action camera for video quality

Specifications

Sensor: 1/1.9in CMOS, 27MP
Lens: N/A
Monitor: 2.27-inch rear touchscreen, 1.4-inch front screen
Viewfinder: N/A
Continuous shooting: 30fps
Movies: 4.3K/60fps
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
Versatile aspect ratio for cropping
+
10-bit mode useful for color grading

Reasons to avoid

-
Still not great in low lighting
-
Budget rivals offer better value

The Hero 11 Black's outright image quality may not be a big leap over its predecessors, but it is a lot more versatile thanks to its new 1/1.9in sensor with an 8:9 aspect ratio. The 5.3K/60p max resolution is the same as the Hero 10 Black, but the ability to reframe footage for different social channels without sacrificing quality is a big deal if you're looking to quickly share travel videos. 

In our tests, we enjoyed its updated user experience, which lets you choose between ‘Easy’ and ‘Pro’ modes to suit your skill level, along with the Hero 11 Black's improved Horizon Lock and HyperSmooth 5.0 talents, which continue to be the gold standard for stabilized video in a camera of this size. You also now get the larger Enduro battery as standard, which makes it a more practical tool for using on-the-road, and you can also easily grab 24.7MP stills from its 5.3K video for quick and easy sharing.

DJI Pocket 2 sitting on a shelf

(Image credit: Future)

15. DJI Pocket 2

A rock-steady vlogging camera

Specifications

Type: Gimbal camera
Sensor Size: 1/1.7in
Resolution: 64MP
Lens: fixed 20mm equivalent
Viewfinder: n/a
Monitor: 1in screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: n/a
Movies: 4K at 60fps
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
Truly pocket-sized
+
Excellent gimbal stabilization

Reasons to avoid

-
Poor low-light performance
-
Can get hot when filming 4K

Yes, the small smartphone-style sensor of DJI’s tiny Pocket 2 handheld camera does limit its video capabilities somewhat, especially compared to some of the premium mirrorless cameras mentioned elsewhere in this guide. It’s poor in low-light conditions and its stills performance is rudimentary at best.

But its small size means you can take it anywhere, and the mechanical 3-axis stabilization that comes from its gimbal lends its videos the air of a Steadicam shot. We think that for vloggers this is brilliant stuff, but even more demanding videographers can get good results due to its 4K capabilities and D-Cinelike color profile.

Of course, you can forget about swapping lenses and other such luxuries, but live within its limits and the Pocket 2 can be a powerful tool.

Alternatively...

DJI Air 2S vs Mavic 2 Pro on a surface

(Image credit: Future)
A fine way to (quite literally) take your videos up a level

Specifications

Weight: 595g
Controller: Yes
Camera resolution: 20MP
Flight time: 31 minutes
Range: 8km-12km

Reasons to buy

+
Large 1-Inch sensor
+
Small and lightweight

Reasons to avoid

-
No adjustable aperture
-
Controller isn’t foldable

DJI’s compact, versatile drone is a fantastic flying camera, capable of capturing excellent quality video thanks to its 1in 20MP sensor and gimbal. Resolution goes up to 5.7K at 30fps, but 4K videos can be recorded at a smoother 60fps and Full HD footage at an even silkier 120fps. We found that videos look striking straight out of the camera, but can be recorded in 10-bit and/or the D-Cinelike color profile if you want maximum editing scope in post-production.

The fixed f/2.8 aperture might cause some issues in bright conditions, but these can be mitigated with ND filters, while the copious safety features, long battery life and powerful wind resistance make the drone a pleasure to fly. 


What’s the best video camera for those on a budget?

While the very best, cutting-edge video cameras will inevitably cost a lot of money, you don’t need to blow thousands on something to shoot excellent footage. There are plenty of affordable camera models available which allow you to record sharp, stable video in a range of scenarios.

If you’re looking for an accessible camera that can capture steady shots on the go, something like the DJI Pocket 2 could be just what you need. Small enough to slip in your pocket, its three-axis gimbal can capture shake-free 4K shots while you walk. Its sensor size isn’t the biggest, but you get a lot for your money – including subject tracking with the motorized head. For solo vloggers on a budget, it’s well worth considering.

Alternatively, a rugged action cam like the GoPro Hero 10 Black puts a lot of video performance in a small, sturdy and relatively affordable package. While it can’t capture the same cinematic depth of field effects you’d get from a more expensive model, it can record rock-steady results in sharp, bright 5.3K. It can also go anywhere, connect readily to your smartphone for live streaming and produce creative results thanks to its range of preset shooting modes.

Looking for a little more manual control? Sony’s ZV-E10 combines a compact form factor with plenty of video versatility, at a very fair price. 4K frame rates are limited to 30fps and there is an issue with rolling shutter when panning. But it also features a fully-articulating touchscreen, ports for external audio gear and the option to swap lenses to suit the scenario.

If your budget can stretch a little further, the Panasonic GH5 Mark II offers outstanding value. It builds on what was already one of the best mirrorless cameras for shooting 4K content, offering a wide variety of 4K frame rates, resolutions and color profiles in a compact, lightweight body. What really gives it an edge is the inclusion of built-in wireless live streaming skills. It can send footage in real-time to the likes of YouTube, without any additional kit, which makes it a brilliantly accessible option for streamers.