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Best cameras for vlogging 2022: the top choices for every budget

The Sony ZV-1 camera showing a man filming on the screen
(Image credit: Sony)

There are a lot of things to consider when choosing the best vlogging camera. With more choice than ever when it comes to creating video content, it can be tricky to zoom in on the right model. Need a helping hand? Our  in-depth guide, based on hundreds of hours of testing, will help you find the top vlogging option for your needs and budget. (Looking for the best YouTube camera instead? Check out our separate guide on those).

We’ve tested a wide range of vlogging cameras and ranked our favorites in the list below. Want the best vlogging camera overall? We reckon the Sony ZV-1 is the ideal choice for most people. Combining a compact body with a capable 1-in sensor and class-leading autofocus, it’s remarkably powerful for something so portable.

If you’re working with a bigger budget, the Panasonic Lumix GH6 is our pick of the premium options and one of the best video cameras you can buy. A mirrorless model with a sharp Micro Four Thirds sensor, it supports a huge range of formats for maximum vlogging versatility.

Equally, if your funds are a little limited, we highly recommend the more affordable DJI Pocket 2. Pocket-friendly in more ways than one, its gimbal head captures super stable footage, while subject-tracking smarts make it a cinch to shoot footage of yourself.

From our comprehensive testing, only the finest vlogging cameras make it into our selection. Our list includes the best beginner cameras for those new to the vlogging game, alongside the very best mirrorless cameras for those who straddle vlogging and more serious filmmaking. 

Together with our handy price comparison tool, you can be sure you’re looking at the best vlogging cameras at the most competitive prices.

A pink line

(Image credit: Future)

Best vlogging cameras in 2022:

Two hands holding the Sony ZV-1 with its microphone windshield

(Image credit: Future)
Best overall vlogging camera

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor size: 1-inch
Resolution: 20.1MP
Effective focal length: 24-70mm
Viewfinder: None
Monitor: 3.0-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 0.921-million dots
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
Max movie resolution: 4K 30p
Size, weight: 105.5 x 60.0 x 43.5 mm, 294g

Reasons to buy

+
Class-leading autofocus
+
Bright 24-70mm lens 
+
Pocketable

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited touch controls
-
MicroUSB rather than USB-C

For a long time, the Canon G7 X Mark III was our favorite compact vlogging camera, but it's been knocked off its perch by the excellent Sony ZV-1. By combining all of the best bits of Sony's RX100 series (for example, the RX100 VII's microphone port and autofocus, plus the RX100 V's bright 24-70mm f/1.8-2.8 lens) the ZV-1 really nails what most people want from a small vlogging camera. 

Sony's latest Real-time tracking and Eye AF are the best around and the ZV-1 also has a huge amount of depth for a compact camera, including a built-in ND filter and profiles like S-Log2 for those who want to embrace color grading. We still think the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III's stabilization and image quality are better still, but you won't find a finer pocket vlogging camera than the Sony ZV-1. 

The Panasonic GH6 camera sitting on a tripod

(Image credit: Future)

2. Panasonic Lumix GH6

Best premium vlogging camera

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: Micro Four Thirds
Resolution: 25.2MP
Effective focal length: N/A
Viewfinder: EVF, 5.68 million dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch articulating touchscreen, 1.84 million dots
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
Max movie resolution: 5.7K 60p
Size, weight: 138.4x100.3x99.6mm, 823g

Reasons to buy

+
Huge range of video options
+
Versatile screen and great handling

Reasons to avoid

-
Larger and heavier than the GH5 II
-
Autofocus still lags behind the best

Panasonic’s second-gen GH5 was one of our favorite cameras for vloggers, offering plenty of creative potential in compact packaging. The GH6 tops it on almost every metric: equipped with a sharper 25.2MP Micro Four Thirds sensor, it can shoot 5.7K footage at 60fps. It also offers a massive arsenal of formats, frame rates and resolutions – including a larger catalogue of 10-bit modes – while forced-fan cooling means limitless recording times.

While it’s marginally larger than the GH5 Mark II, it still retains a relatively portable form factor. Its robust build is complemented by familiar controls and new tally lights front and back. The 3-inch rear touchscreen flips, twists and tilts, while a second video record button on the front now makes it easier for vloggers to start rolling.

Connectivity options are comprehensive, although the GH6 does lack the live-streaming capabilities of the GH5 Mark II. There’s still no phase detection AF either, although contrast-based autofocus performance does seem improved from the GH5 Mark II. Stabilization is superior too, courtesy of an algorithmic upgrade that makes the GH6 one of the best cameras for smoothing out walking motion in a natural way.

A hand holding the DJI Pocket 2 vlogging camera

(Image credit: Future)
Best budget vlogging camera

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor size: 1/1.7-in
Resolution: 64MP
Effective focal length: 20mm
Viewfinder: None
Connectivity: Wi-Fi
Max movie resolution: 4K 60p
Size, weight: 124.7 x 38.1 x 30.0 mm, 117g

Reasons to buy

+
Super-stable footage
+
Impressive subject-tracking
+
Creator Combo for vloggers

Reasons to avoid

-
Struggles in low light
-
Gets hot when filming 4K

We were big fans of the original DJI Osmo Pocket, but this sequel fixes a lot of its limitations and makes it the best compact option around for solo filmmakers. The Sony ZV-1 (above) trumps it for outright video quality, but if you tend to shoot a lot of walk-and-talk style clips to camera, then the Pocket 2's combination of a three-axis gimbal and solid face-tracking could make it more appealing.

Compared to the Osmo Pocket (which remains on sale as a more affordable alternative), the DJI Pocket 2 brings a new larger sensor, a brighter lens, improved microphones and wider field of view, which means you don't have to hold it out at arm's length when talking to camera.

Plonk it down on a tripod base or surface, and it'll turn to keep you in shot as you walk around in front of it. Despite that larger sensor, the Pocket 2 still isn't the ideal camera for low light situations or high contrast scenes, but it's a very nice upgrade on using your phone in a gimbal and the improved four-mic audio setup means you get some very decent sound quality to match.

The Fujifilm X-S10, the best vlogging camera you can buy right now, on a bench

(Image credit: Future)
This all-rounder that makes perfect sense for vloggers

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 26.1MP
Effective focal length: N/A
Viewfinder: EVF, 2.36 million dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1.04 million dots
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
Max movie resolution: 4K 30p
Size, weight: 126 x 85 x 65 mm, 465g

Reasons to buy

+
Great sensor 
+
IBIS in a small body
+
Great handling

Reasons to avoid

-
No weatherproofing 
-
Limited touchscreen controls

Arguably the best all-round mirrorless camera at this price point, the Fujifilm X-S10 is adept at lots of different types of shooting – including vlogging. It's not the cheapest or smallest option in this guide (the Sony ZV-1 is a better compact option), but in terms of quality and bang-for-your-buck, it's our current top pick for video creators. Pair it with an XC15-45mm kit lens, and you have a superb vlogging setup. 

Inside the X-S10 is the tried-and-tested combination of a 26.1MP X-Trans CMOS 4 sensor and X-Processor 4, which we’ve already seen in the Fujifilm X-T4. It shoots uncropped 4K/30p video, has in-body image stabilization (IBIS) to smooth out handheld jitters, and a vari-angle screen that flips round to face you. The X-S10 is also packed with other useful features, such as Full HD recording at 240p for a 10x slow motion effect, F-Log recording, and the option to output 4:2:2 10-bit video, too. 

On top of all of that you’ve also got some fine retro styling and a great, comfortable grip, which makes it a great hybrid option for shooting stills, too. Considering all of the features you get, it's also available at a pretty wallet-friendly price. But be warned: its wide range of great X-series lenses may prove hard to resist.

The front of the Sony ZV-E10 showing its image sensor

(Image credit: Future)
An affordable, versatile option for vloggers

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 24.2MP
Effective focal length: N/A
Viewfinder: None
Monitor: 3.0-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 921k dots
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
Max movie resolution: 4K 30p
Size, weight: 115.2 x 64.2 x 44.8mm, 343g

Reasons to buy

+
Great autofocus
+
Compact form factor
+
Relatively affordable

Reasons to avoid

-
Rolling shutter while panning
-
No 4K/60p mode
-
No viewfinder or IBIS

Looking for a compact vlogging camera, but one with more flexibility than the Sony ZV-1 or DJI Pocket 2? The ZV-E10 could well be your best option. It's based on the relatively old hardware of the Sony A6100, hence the relatively affordable price tag, but brings lots of video-focused features that make it a good alternative to the ZV-1 if you fancy changing lenses and focal lengths for different effects.

The ZV-E10 is based on the same 24.2MP APS-C CMOS sensor as many of its A6000-series stablemates, which is both good and bad news. It's a large sensor that produces impressive video and photo quality for the price, particularly in low light when compared to its smaller sensor rivals. But it does have rolling shutter issues (that 'jello' effect) when you pan quickly, and the camera does also lack a viewfinder, a 4K/60p mode and in-body image stabilization. 

Still, there is an electronic SteadyShot to smooth handheld jitters, along with great software features like 'Product Showcase' that we saw on the ZV-1. The ZV-E10's autofocus is also best-in-class at this price, so if you don't mind those aforementioned limitations and want to flexibility of interchangeable lenses, it's a great new option for vloggers. 

The GoPro Hero 10 Black action camera sitting on a wooden bench

(Image credit: Future)
The ultimate rugged camera for adventurous vloggers

Specifications

Type: Action
Sensor size: 1/2.3-inch
Resolution: 23.6MP
Viewfinder: None
Monitor: 2.27-inch touchscreen
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
Max movie resolution: 5.3K/60p
Weight: 153g

Reasons to buy

+
Powerful GP2 processor
+
New 4K /120p mode is fun
+
Front-facing display

Reasons to avoid

-
Same small sensor
-
Not a low-light king

With the same small sensor, screens and shell as the GoPro Hero 9 Black before it, the Hero 10 Black doesn’t reinvent the action camera. But it does offer a more refined experience than its predecessor, making it the most versatile action cam available to adventurous vloggers. A snappier touchscreen interface and menu system make it much easier to use, while the new GP2 processor ensures polished performance. The chip boots 5K frame rates to 60p for slicker vlogs, while 4K at up to 120fps unlocks sharper slow-mo footage for captivating cut scenes. 

Stabilization gets an upgrade too, with HyperSmooth 4.0 and horizon leveling on-board for supremely steady footage (even if you’re swaying at angles of 45 degrees). Live-streaming is still subject to some limitations (YouTubers need at least 1,000 subs) but you can now stream with HyperSmooth 4.0 enabled. Add a hydrophobic lens cover to its established endurance skills and the GoPro Hero 10 Black becomes the clear winner if you need top-notch video in tricky conditions – even if budget rivals offer better value.

The Panasonic GH5 Mark II vlogging camera mounted on a tripod with its touchscreen pulled out

(Image credit: Future)
A great option for live-streamers

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: Four Thirds
Resolution: 20.3MP
Effective focal length: N/A
Viewfinder: EVF, 3.68 million dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1.84 million dots
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
Max movie resolution: 4K 60p
Size, weight: 139 x 98 x 87 mm, 727g

Reasons to buy

+
Built-in wireless streaming
+
Strong image quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Not a big leap over the GH5

The original Panasonic GH5 was a legendary camera thanks to its combination of class-leading 4K video specs and relatively small, affordable body with IBIS. The GH5 Mark II doesn't make big improvements to this existing formula, but it does add one particularly useful trick: wireless live streaming.

With the Panasonic GH6 being the true upgrade to the GH5 from a video quality standpoint, live streaming is really the focus of the GH5 Mark II – and it works well. Streaming to YouTube and Facebook is pretty simple thanks to the built-in options inside the Lumix Sync app, but you can also stream to others like Twitch thanks to its support for the standard RTMP/RTMPS protocol. 

Streaming quality is limited to 1080/60p and the GH5 Mark II's autofocus still lags behind the best, but it's perfectly serviceable in most situations and the camera's other specs (in-body image stabilization, an articulating screen, plus a huge array of video shooting options) make it one of the best vlogging cameras around, particularly if you fancy dabbling with the live element.

The Fujifilm X-T200 sat on a wooden table with its 15-45mm kit lens

(Image credit: Future)
One of the best budget vlogging cameras around

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: APS-C CMOS
Resolution: 24.2MP
Effective focal length: N/A
Viewfinder: EVF, 2.36 million dots
Monitor: 3.5-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 2.76 million dots
Connectivity: Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
Max movie resolution: 4K
Size, weight: 121 x 84 x 55mm, 370g

Reasons to buy

+
Lightweight retro design
+
Sharp 3.5-inch touchscreen

Reasons to avoid

-
No video subject tracking
-
No digital gimbal at 4K

Fujifilm’s X-T200 is an attractive entry-level camera with plenty to offer for vloggers. Featuring the familiar retro styling of the X-series, the X-T200 is equipped with a 24.2MP APS-C sensor that captures uncropped 4K video at 30p by ‘downsampling’ from 6K footage. The results are impressively detailed and notably more dynamic than the camera’s 1080p efforts. It's a slight shame that digital image stabilization only works in Full HD, but use a lens with built-in IS and you won't miss it too much.

While the X-T200 can capture 1080p footage at up to 120fps, the new HDR video mode (which combines multiple frames to enhance dynamic range) is only offered up to 60fps. Despite these small quibbles, the X-T200 is brilliant to shoot with. The 3.5-inch vari-angle touchscreen is fantastically sharp and makes framing a joy, while a 3.5mm mini stereo input and USB-C port add welcome versatility. It’s a shame that subject tracking can’t be used for video, but the X-T200 is a versatile and capable vlogging option all the same and one of the best at its price.

The DJI Action 2 action camera on a table with its display module

(Image credit: Future)
A unique, modular action cam with great vlogging potential

Specifications

Type: Action
Sensor size: 1/1.7-inch
Resolution: 12MP
Viewfinder: None
Monitor: 1.76-inch touchscreen
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
Max movie resolution: 4K/60p
Weight: 64g

Reasons to buy

+
Tiny, modular design
+
Punchy display
+
Wider FOV than GoPro

Reasons to avoid

-
Overheating limits clip lengths
-
Not great in low light

The DJI Action 2 is unlike any other action camera – and if you don't mind recording relatively short clips (think five minutes at a time), then its tiny, modular form factor makes a lot of sense for on-the-go vloggers. If you want to see yourself in the frame while recording, you'll need to go for its Dual-Screen Combo bundle, which includes an extra magnetic module that snaps onto the base block and gives you a front-facing screen. The benefit of the Action 2's modular design is that you can always remove this and turn it back into a wearable, 64g camera.

Despite its tiny size, the Action 2's camera actually contains a larger 1/1.7in sensor than the one on the GoPro Hero 10 Black, and we were impressed by the quality of its 4K video in daylight conditions. On its own, this camera module is also waterproof down to ten meters, though it's worth bearing in mind that additional modules (like the Touchscreen module) aren't waterproof without a case. Still, despite a few practical drawbacks, like those overheating limitations on clip lengths, the Action 2 is a great option if you need a vlogging camera that's small, discreet and versatile. 

The Canon EOS M50 Mark II on a wooden floor next to a 11-22mm lens.

(Image credit: TechRadar)
A stellar 1080p option for those on a budget

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: APS-C CMOS
Resolution: 24.1MP
Effective focal length: N/A
Viewfinder: EVF, 2.36 million dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1.04 million dots
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, NFC and Bluetooth
Max movie resolution: 4K
Size, weight: 116 x 88 x 59mm, 390g

Reasons to buy

+
Vari-angle touchscreen
+
Excellent Dual Pixel Autofocus

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavily cropped 4K video
-
Limited native lenses

It's a shame Canon didn't make the EOS M50 Mark II a bigger update to its EOS M50 predecessor, but it remains a good 1080p video option for anyone who's starting out on their vlogging journey. The main updates it brings are Eye AF for stills and video, which works well for an entry-level model, and the option of shooting vertical video for the likes of Instagram.

The main drawback of the EOS M50 Mark II is its heavy 1.56x crop on 4K video, which it inherits from its predecessor. This crop increases to a massive 1.75x if you turn on digital image stabilization – so if shooting 4K video is your main priority, we'd recommend going for the Canon EOS M6 Mark II instead (see further down). But if you're happy with shooting 1080p video, then the M50 Mark II remains a fine option, thanks to its combination of a large 24.1MP APS-C CMOS sensor, vari-angle touchscreen, microphone input and that compact form factor.

The Fujifilm X-T4 placed on a wooden bench with the new 16-80mm kit lens.

(Image credit: Future)
A premium vlogging camera for hybrid shooters

Specifications

Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 26.1MP
Viewfinder: 3,690K dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch tilt-angle touchscreen, 1,620K dots
Autofocus: 425-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 15fps (mechanical shutter), 30fps (electronic)
Movies: 4K at 60p
User level: Intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Superb image quality
+
IBIS a big bonus for video

Reasons to avoid

-
No headphone jack
-
Video recording limit

If video quality is your priority, then it's hard to beat the Fujifilm X-T4 as a vlogging all-rounder. Sure, some full-frame cameras can still edge it for dynamic range and high ISO performance, but it's not a huge gap and the X-T4 offers a smaller overall setup that's ideal for travel. One of the best hybrid shooters around, the X-T4 brings significant upgrades on the X-T3 that include in-body image stabilization (IBIS), a bigger battery and improved autofocus. 

The latter is quick and reliable for both stills and video, though you'll preferably want to use it with some of Fujifilm's more recent glass, like the XF16-80mm f4 R OIS, for the best results. With a microphone input, front-facing screen, weather-sealing and the ability to shoot Cinema 4K videos up to 60fps, the X-T4 is a great all-round vlogging option for those who want a camera that can take care of both their stills and video needs. 

(Image credit: Future)

The Insta360 Go 2 housed in its tripod accessory sat on a wooden bench

(Image credit: Future)
A tiny but versatile vlogging camera with a very clever case

Specifications

Type: Action
Sensor size: 1/2.3in
Resolution: 9.2MP
Effective focal length: 11.24mm
Viewfinder: None
Monitor: None
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
Max movie resolution: 1440p at 50fps
Size, weight: 68.1 x 48.5 x 26.5mm, 63.5g (Charge Case)

Reasons to buy

+
Improved image quality
+
Charging case works as a remote/tripod

Reasons to avoid

-
No display for framing
-
Stabilization not as good as GoPro

Few cameras offer the vlogging portability of the Insta360 Go 2. Hitting the scales at a mere 26.5g, the camera itself is a tiny, pared-back pebble that’s capable of capturing detailed and dynamic 1440p footage at up to 50fps. Stabilization isn’t up to GoPro standards, but the FlowState software does a reasonable job of mitigating walking motion, especially if you process video with your laptop rather than the Insta360 app. There’s no display on the camera itself, which will be a dealbreaker for some, but the app can be used for a wireless video preview. 

More useful, though, is the protective charging case: home to two buttons and an OLED readout, the controls and camera face the user when the Insta360 Go 2 is docked, making it an ideal handheld vlogging setup. The case also features fold-out legs for tripod duties and works as a remote for wireless camera control. At 30 minutes, battery life isn’t the best, but with a single microphone that renders vocals with decent punch and clarity, the Insta360 Go 2 is an easy, properly pocketable option for recording quick clips and vlogs on the go.

(Image credit: Future)

Angled shot of the Panasonic Lumix S5 on a wooden bench with its 20-60mm lens

(Image credit: Future)
A portable full-frame camera with excellent video specs

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: Full-frame
Resolution: 24.2MP
Effective focal length: N/A
Viewfinder: EVF, 2.36 million dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch articulating touchscreen, 1.84 million dots
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
Max movie resolution: 4K/30p
Size, weight: 132.6 x 97.1 x 81.9mm, 714g

Reasons to buy

+
Compact and lightweight
+
Outstanding video specs

Reasons to avoid

-
No full-sized HDMI port
-
Autofocus isn’t best-in-class

Offering full-frame performance in a Micro Four Thirds body, the Panasonic Lumix S5 is a fantastic hybrid that should appeal to a wide variety of creators. 

Smaller and lighter than the GH5 yet equipped with a full-frame mirrorless sensor, the Lumix S5 sits extremely comfortably in the hand and features a comprehensive array of buttons and dials. And vloggers will welcome the arrival of a fully articulating touchscreen which can flip out to face forwards.

In fact, the S5 offers plenty to lure in video creators. It can capture 10-bit 4K internally, cropped 4K at 60p and uncropped 4K at 30p. It also supports V-Log, time-lapses, dual native ISO and anamorphic 4K. In-body image stabilization keeps things nice and smooth and, although the autofocus is still contrast-based, the AF-C setting is more than capable of following subjects while walking and talking.

The only real compromise – besides a 30-minute limit on 10-bit clips – is the inclusion of a Micro HDMI port, rather than a full-size one. And it might be worth considering a second battery if you’ll be recording all day. But with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on-board, as well as a 20-60mm kit lens that’s ideal for video, the S5 should tick almost every box for vloggers.

(Image credit: Future)

A powered-on Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark III perched on a leather sofa

(Image credit: Future)
Still a fine pocket vlogging camera, despite the arrival of the Sony ZV-1

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor size: 1.0-type
Resolution: 20.1MP
Effective focal length: 24-100mm
Viewfinder: None
Monitor: 3.0-inch tilt-angle touchscreen
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, NFC
Max movie resolution: 4K
Size, weight: 105.5 x 60.9 x 41.4mm, 304g

Reasons to buy

+
Tilting touchscreen
+
Effective stabilization
+
Mic input

Reasons to avoid

-
No viewfinder

Long popular with vloggers, Canon’s G7X range has kicked it up a notch with the Mark III. There’s a very capable 20.1 megapixel one-inch sensor, but now it’s also equipped with uncropped 4K video recording, along with something that's been requested many times – a microphone socket. 

This means you can elevate the sound above and beyond the internal mic’s offering, if you want to. Even better, the G7X III can stream directly to YouTube – which is, right now, an advantage over the Sony ZV-1 – so you can live vlog whatever’s happening around you, without having to downgrade to using your smartphone. USB charging is another great feature which means you can give it power bursts on the go – particularly prudent if you’ve been shooting a lot of 4K video.

The G7X Mark III's contrast detection-only AF and more limited tilting screen mean it's been nudged down this list by the Sony ZV-1, but it's also more affordable and is still well worth considering if you need a pocket vlogging rocket.

Alternatively...

A hand holding the DJI OM 5 phone gimbal

(Image credit: Future)
A supercharged selfie stick for smartphone vloggers

Specifications

Type: Gimbal
Sensor size: N/A
Resolution: N/A
Effective focal length: N/A
Viewfinder: N/A
Monitor: No
Connectivity: Bluetooth 5.0
Max movie resolution: N/A
Size, weight: 138x32mm, 72g

Reasons to buy

+
Neat, compact design
+
Improved tracking features

Reasons to avoid

-
Fiddly selfie stick extension
-
Tricky to angle on a tripod

Today’s smartphones are already excellent vlogging tools, but DJI’s stabilized handles are a great way to add to your mobile’s video skills. With a smaller battery than previous editions, the latest model also sacrifices power bank functionality in favor of a more refined, compact design. 

In testing, we thought the OM 5 felt more elegant and premium than previous editions. We also felt that the option to extend it into a selfie stick added useful creative scope, even if it proved a little fiddly – and offered a less versatile roll range than the OM 4 before it. We found that the 3-axis gimbal still did a great job of keeping footage smooth and steady. Improved active tracking and ShotGuides in the Memo app were also a hit in testing. If you’re happy to have a grip attached to your phone, this tool will transform it into a clever videography combo.


The DJI Mini 3 Pro drone in flight in a forest

(Image credit: DJI)
A powerful palm-sized drone for vlogging from above

Specifications

Type: Drone
Sensor size: 1/1.3-inch CMOS
Resolution: 12.1MP
Effective focal length: 24mm
Viewfinder: N/A
Monitor: No
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 5.2
Max movie resolution: 4K
Size, weight: 171x245x62mm, 249g

Reasons to buy

+
Useful obstacle avoidance
+
Handy automated flight modes

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricier than previous versions

Think only the most successful vloggers can afford flying film crews? DJI’s latest miniature machine puts proper aerial videography skills in the palm of your hand. A serious upgrade for the Mini series, it squeezes the skills of high-spec drones into conveniently compact packaging. More curvaceous than before, its aerodynamic design and larger propellors result in longer 34-minute maximum flight times which bore out in testing. We found that the larger 1/1.3-inch sensor delivered vast quality improvements across both stills and video, especially in low light. 

Usefully, the stabilized camera on the nose can now be tilted to capture portrait video, making it perfect for TikTok and Instagram Stories. If you’re flying solo, built-in obstacle avoidance sensors mean trees shouldn’t be an issue, while automated QuickShots make it easy to shoot cinematic content single-handedly. It’s pricier than previous versions, but we still think the Mini 3 Pro’s small size, low weight and pro capabilities make it a compelling package for vloggers looking to get airborne.


How to pick the best vlogging camera for you

From premium webcams to mirrorless models, the best vlogging cameras come in a range of shapes and sizes. The features you need will vary depending on what and how you like to shoot.

If you’re a solo filmmaker, for example, you’ll probably want a camera with an articulating touchscreen which makes it much easier to frame shots when working by yourself. Equally, if a lot of your content involves speaking to the camera, you’ll need an external microphone input to ensure you capture top-notch audio for your audience. Reliable face-tracking autofocus will also mean that your subject stays sharp, even if they move within the frame.

Sony ZV-1

(Image credit: Future)

A lot of vloggers like to walk and talk at the same time. If this is your style, you should consider a camera with in-body image stabilization. This will help to smooth out any shaky motion caused by your footsteps and make footage much more watchable. Some cameras go a step further with an integrated gimbal which counteracts motion on several axes to stay level, like the DJI Pocket 2.

Almost all of the best vlogging cameras can now shoot in 4K resolution as standard. But it’s important to look beyond resolution alone. High frame rates of 120fps and above will allow you to shoot stunning slow-motion footage, for example. And if post-processing is part of your workflow, 10-bit color depth will give you greater flexibility in the editing room.

Insta360 Go 2

(Image credit: Future)

What kind of camera do vloggers use?

As you can tell from the buying advice above, vloggers use a wide range of different cameras depending on their specific needs. 

Many vloggers favor mirrorless models for their combination of image quality, performance and flexibility. The best mirrorless vlogging cameras feature high-resolution sensors, in-body image stabilization for smoother footage, plus the option to swap lenses to suit different shooting scenarios – all in packages that are relatively portable. Mirrorless cameras are also more likely to feature ports for connecting external accessories, such as microphones, headphones and hot-shoe lights.

That said, some vloggers prefer to prioritize portability. Truly tiny cameras like the Insta360 Go 2 sacrifice total creative control in favor of quick, simple accessibility for capturing off-the-cuff footage. Compact cameras like the Sony ZV-1 can represent a good middle ground for a lot of vloggers, offering solid image quality and manual control options, yet still in a form factor that can comfortably slip into a pocket.

Other vloggers choose cameras which are specifically suited to their shooting needs. Rugged models like the GoPro Hero 10 Black, for example, offer advanced connectivity and live-streaming options, plus plenty of creative modes, in a sturdy package that makes it easy to shoot vlogs even in extreme weather conditions.

Vloggers who stream from a seated position will often favor a premium webcam like the Razer Kiyo Pro, which deftly fills a unique niche. Equally, those who want a dedicated tool to record while they walk-and-talk might use something like DJI’s Pocket 2.

What video quality should you be looking for?

Whatever type of camera you go for, considering video quality will likely be top of your list. At the absolute minimum you’ll be looking to shoot in Full HD (1080p), while 4K is becoming increasingly common. Although the higher resolution format will take up more space on your hard drive, it should future-proof your captures a little more than Full HD. 

Other specifications to pay attention to include built-in Wi-Fi for sharing your vlogs on the move, a fully articulating or tilting monitor for helping to frame your face, a built-in microphone socket for enhancing sound quality. 

We’ve picked out 16 top cameras of various shapes, sizes and attributes to suit different styles of vlogging – as well as highlighting some that will fit into your all-round stills and video shooting requirements.

Panasonic GH5 Mark II vlogging camera

(Image credit: Future)

How we test vlogging cameras

The most important features for a vlogging camera are its video quality, autofocus, in-body image stabilization and audio options, so those are the main areas our tests focus on. 

To review the video quality, we shoot at the camera's highest resolution and frame-rate in a variety of handheld scenes, including the popular walk-and-talk style, to see how it handles colors, skin tones, detail and rolling shutter. We also include high-contrast scenes to test how well the auto-exposure and white balance adapt to changes in lighting.

These tests are also a good opportunity to the test the vlogging camera's Face and Eye tracking autofocus, along with the quality of its stabilization (both electronic and mechanical, if available). Another thing we test in these scenes is an oft-overlooked part of the vlogging equation, the built-in microphones. If the camera has a microphone input, we'll also use it with an external lav mic to see how the quality compares to its internal audio.

Many of the latest vlogging cameras include additional features like flat color profiles, articulating touchscreens, built-in ND filters and, in Sony's case, a 'product showcase' feature that's ideal for those who run a YouTube channel from home. If available, we test all of these functions to see how they fare compared to their closest rivals, then wrap up our conclusions based on our various impressions of the camera's build quality, design, video quality, audio quality and features. 

Mark Wilson
Mark Wilson

Mark is the Cameras Editor at TechRadar. Having worked in tech journalism for a ludicrous 17 years, Mark is now attempting to break the world record for the number of camera bags hoarded by one person. He was previously Cameras Editor at Trusted Reviews, Acting editor on Stuff.tv, as well as Features editor and Reviews editor on Stuff magazine. As a freelancer, he's contributed to titles including The Sunday Times, FourFourTwo and Arena. And in a former life, he also won The Daily Telegraph's Young Sportswriter of the Year. But that was before he discovered the strange joys of getting up at 4am for a photo shoot in London's Square Mile. 

With contributions from