The best beginner mirrorless camera for 2024: budget stars for new photographers

The best beginner mirrorless cameras make it easy for new photographers to shoot quality stills and video. We’ve tested all of the top entry-level options and ranked our favorites in this exhaustive list. Our expert guide spans everything from starter cameras to premium models with features you can grow into, covering a range of price brackets. Each has been reviewed extensively in the real world.

Based on our test results, we think the best mirrorless camera for most beginners is currently the Canon EOS R10. Styled like a compact DSLR, it’s an impressively versatile option that we think is also the best camera for beginners overall. We like its accessible controls and handling, as well as its decent burst speeds and subject-detecting autofocus.

If your budget is tighter, we also highly recommend the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV. A Micro Four Thirds model with a tidy design and capable stills sensor, its computational shooting modes help novices to get creative, while in-body image stabilization is superb for handheld photography.

From affordable stills cameras to all-rounders perfect for learning the ropes, there’s something in the list below for every newbie. Our guide is designed to help you find the best beginner mirrorless camera for you, whatever your expectations. Our in-depth tests and objective criteria ensure every model here is a good fit for beginners. We’ve also shared some useful explanations and buying tips at the bottom of the page.

Written by
Tim Coleman
Written by
Timothy Coleman

Tim is TechRadar's Cameras editor. With more than 15 years in the photo video industry and most of those in the world of tech journalism, Tim has developed a deeply technical knowledge and practical experience with all things camera related. Tim notes, "Many beginners will have a limited budget, which is why we've included a number of more affordable mirrorless cameras here. But we think that overall value is important, too. That's why our guide also features well-equipped models with the right features for novices to learn and grow with."

The quick list

If you want an instant summary of the best beginner mirrorless cameras, you can use the round-up below for an overview of our top picks. When you find one that fits your needs and budget, you can jump to our full write-up via the link beneath each entry.

The best beginner mirrorless cameras for 2024

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Below you'll find full write-ups for each of the best beginner mirrorless cameras in our list. We've tested each one extensively, so you can be sure that our recommendations can be trusted.

The best beginner mirrorless camera overall

The Canon EOS R10 camers sitting on a wooden bannister

(Image credit: Future)
The best beginner mirrorless camera overall

Specifications

Sensor size: APS-C CMOS**
Resolution: 24.2MP
Viewfinder: EVF OLED, 2,360,000 dots
Monitor: 2.95-inch articulating touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 15fps
Movies: 4K
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
Compact and lightweight
+
Modern autofocus abilities

Reasons to avoid

-
No in-body image stabilization
-
Crop on 4K/60p footage
Buy it if:

✅ You're a beginner looking for your first camera: The power and usability of the EOS R10's autofocus, plus its superior burst-shooting, put it top of the pile for those starting out.

✅ You need an affordable sports or family camera: While the EOS R10 has more a mid-range price tag, its burst shooting speeds and autofocus are worth the premium if you're looking to shoot moving subjects.

Don't buy it if:

You need a wide choice of native lenses: Right now, the EOS R10's main weakness is a lack of native lenses.

❌ You'll be mostly shooting video: No headphone jack for monitoring audio, nor any in-body image stabilization to keep things steady. This isn'y a vlogging camera.

Striking a great balance between accessibility and performance, we think the Canon EOS R10 is a fantastic entry-level camera to grow with. Compact yet comfy in the hand, its dual control dials and dedicated AF joystick made it easy to try different techniques in testing. The articulating touchscreen also feels like a natural switch from smartphone shooting. While its 24.2MP sensor isn’t cutting-edge, modern autofocus and Canon’s punchy Digic X processor make it an adaptable camera for learners. 

During our review, AF tracking proved impressively reliable for a beginner camera. Burst shooting rates of 15fps also make it a good choice if you want to try action photography. Handheld options are limited after dark by the absence of in-body image stabilization, but the EOS R10 otherwise holds up well against APS-C rivals, producing clean, detailed stills with pleasant colors. Its video skills give it some hybrid versatility, too. While there’s no flat color profile, it can record uncropped 4K/30p footage by oversampling from the sensor’s 6K resolution. All that’s really missing is a wide choice of native lenses, something that will hopefully improve soon.

Read our in-depth Canon EOS R10 review


The best budget beginner mirrorless camera

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV, one of the best camera for beginners, on a tripod

(Image credit: Future)
The best budget mirrorless camera for beginners

Specifications

Sensor size: Micro Four Thirds
Resolution: 20.3MP
Viewfinder: 2,360K dots
Monitor: 3-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,037K dots
Autofocus: 121-point Contrast Detection AF
Max continuous shooting rate: 15fps
Video: 4K at 30p
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
Capable sensor
+
Compact body
+
Impressive image stabilization

Reasons to avoid

-
No microphone input
-
No USB-C port
Buy it if:

✅ You want a small, powerful stills camera: Compact proportions belie the class-leading stills capabilities of the E-M10 Mark IV.

✅ You often shoot handheld: In-body image stabilization gives the Mark IV an edge over rivals, keeping handheld shots sharp.

Don't buy it if:

You record a lot of video: The E-M10 Mark IV can shoot decent footage, but no mic input and a 4K/30p cap limit its blogging potential.

❌ You own the E-M10 Mark III: Upgrades include a new sensor and flip-down screen, but these don’t justify swapping from the Mark III.

It isn't radically cheaper than its Canon EOS R10 and Fujifilm X-T30 II rivals, but the OM-D E-M10 Mark IV is a little more affordable for beginners. And because it has a smaller Four Thirds sensor than those APS-C cameras, it's an even more compact package to shoot with. Videographers should look elsewhere, because it lacks both a microphone port and a USB-C connection. But for budding photographers, it offers a lot: we found its ergonomic grip comfortable in testing, paired with an approachable button layout and handy flip-down touchscreen. We also found it to be the most photo-centric camera at its price point, delivering great stills during our review.

Olympus cameras have long gone big on beginner-friendly software modes, pioneering some of the computational techniques that would later be built on by smartphones. It's the same here, with an 'Advanced Photo' mode that steers novices through techniques like long exposures. The in-body image stabilization system – borrowed from the flagship E-M1 – also proved superb. It might not grab headlines, but the Mark IV is still a great first camera for beginners. That said, if your budget stretches a little further, we also highly recommend the travel-friendly OM System OM-5 as a powerhouse alternative.

Read our in-depth Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV review


The best premium beginner mirrorless camera

Nikon Z5, one of the best beginner mirrorless camera, on a wood surface

(Image credit: Future)
The best premium beginner mirrorless camera

Specifications

Sensor size: Full-frame CMOS
Resolution: 24.5MP
Viewfinder: EVF, 3,600,000 dots
Monitor: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 4.5fps
Movies: 4K
User level: Beginner/Intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Great viewfinder
+
Very capable AF system

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavy crop on 4K video
-
Expensive for this class
Buy it if:

✅ You want to jump straight into full-frame: Whether you’re upgrading from a smartphone or an existing camera, the full-frame sensor Nikon Z5 will elevate your photos.

✅ You’re looking for a lightweight travel camera: With its full-frame sensor and pretty compact proportions, the Nikon Z5 is an excellent travel companion.

Don't buy it if:

You want to shoot action: While the burst rate is comparable to rivals, the Nikon Z5 is hampered by its modest burst shooting speed. 

❌ You want to shoot video regularly: If video is going to be a big part of what you’re looking to capture, then the Nikon Z5 isn’t the right camera for you; its 4K video is pretty limited.

This compact full-frame camera is arguably the best entry-level mirrorless camera Nikon has produced to date. It's a full-featured option for beginners or hobbyists, capable of handling a range of subjects without difficulty. In testing we, were impressed by its handling and image quality, as well as its autofocus system, which comes with a fast and intuitive Eye AF for shooting beautiful portraits. 

There are high-end features here as well, including a super high-res viewfinder and tough, weather-sealed body. And, while it looks similar to the Z6 and Z7 bodies, it comes with a 24-50mm kit lens that's designed to retract when not in use, making it a great walkaround or travel camera. 

Its burst rate of 4.5fps doesn't stack up against some of the competition and its 4K video suffers from a significant crop. Nevertheless, we still highly recommend the Z5 for anyone looking to start their photography journey – or for a really capable all-rounder. In fact, the only reason we've got this Nikon lower down our list is the price tag: it's expensive when compared to some of the other entry-level cameras out there, full frame or otherwise.

Read our in-depth Nikon Z5 review


The best everyday beginner mirrorless camera

The Fujifilm X-T30 II resting on a rock

(Image credit: Future)
The best everyday option for most beginners

Specifications

Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 26.1MP
Viewfinder: EVF OLED, 2,360,000 dots
Monitor: 3.0inch tilting touchscreen, 1,620,000 dots
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8fps
Movies: 4K
User level: Beginner/Intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Great styling and handling
+
Uncropped 4K footage

Reasons to avoid

-
Screen only tilts
-
No in-body image stabilization
Buy it if:

✅ You want a good all-round mid-range camera: Fujifilm makes some of the best mid-range cameras on the market, including the versatile and attractive Fujifilm X-T30 II.

✅ You want a Fujifilm, but your budget is limited: The X-T30 II is not exactly be cheap, but is good value given the specs you’re getting versus the X-S20 and X-T5.

Don't buy it if:

You already have the X-T30: The Mark II is a relatively modest upgrade over the original X-T30, so there’s little point in investing in the newer version. 

❌ You’re looking for a vlogging camera: The X-T30 II is designed more for photographers who might shoot the occasional video, rather than serious videographers.

Fujifilm’s original X-T30 was already an excellent everyday camera. Its successor doesn’t dramatically change the recipe. However, we think it does just enough to sweeten the deal. Using an identical chassis to its predecessor, the X-T30 II likewise balances performance with relatively compact proportions. Adopting the same classic retro styling, we felt it was lovely to look at and fantastic to handle. The rear LCD is now sharper, although we still found ourselves wishing for a fully articulating screen, rather than a panel that only tilts.

With the same sensor and 425-point AF system as the original X-T30, we found that the second edition similarly captures bags of detail and beautifully rich tones. A new algorithm more accurately tracks moving targets. It’s not perfect, but it performed pretty well in testing when subjects moved predictably. Focus point sensitivity has also been improved, and we found that the X-T30 II did a solid job picking out fine details in low lighting. If you’re shopping for the best beginner mirrorless camera and you don't already own the X-T30, the Fujifilm X-T30 II is a mid-range all-rounder that’s well worth considering.

Read our in-depth Fujifilm X-T30 II review


The best beginner mirrorless camera for video

The front of the Sony ZV-E10 showing its image sensor

(Image credit: Future)
The best beginner mirrorless camera for video

Specifications

Sensor size: Exmor CMOS sensor
Resolution: 24.2MP
Viewfinder: N/A
Monitor: 2.95-inch TFT, 921,600 dots
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 11 fps
Movies: 4K 30 fps
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
Articulating screen
+
Great autofocus
+
Solid audio credentials

Reasons to avoid

-
Rolling shutter while panning
-
No viewfinder
Buy it if:

You want a compact interchangeable lenses vlogging cam: The Sony ZV-E10 is a tiny 4K vlogging camera with a fully articulating screen and a host of compact lenses to help you really get the most out of it.

You want a high-quality streaming camera: With plug-and-play ease, the Sony ZV-E10 is a fine webcam or live-streaming camera.

Don't buy it if:

You need a viewfinder: The Sony A6100 is an alternative for anyone who wants the guts of the Sony ZV-E10 with a built-in electronic viewfinder for framing shots.

❌ You want 4K video capture at 60fps: The Sony ZV-E10’s 4K capture caps out at 25/30 fps, so if you want to slow down your footage without compromising on resolution, you’ll need to look elsewhere.

The Sony ZV-E10 is more than just a gap-filler in Sony's lineup. While it is a logical addition, servicing a need that was previously underserved, it's also a powerful video camera in its own right. Vlogging-focused, it boasts an articulating screen, boosted mics, and a compact body that's portable and easy to handle when you're shooting while moving.

Of course, it takes impressive photos as well. We tested it with a variety of lenses in a varying scenes, and it delivered a rich shot with impressive depth, detail, and contrast without fail. So, it's just as capable as a stills camera, if you're looking to just use one body for all your shooting needs.

It isn’t perfect, mind you. It does sadly produce significant rolling shutter when you're panning and has no 4K capture at 60p (though, to be fair, this isn’t common at the price either). However, its image noise is well-controlled, it delivers three degrees of SteadyShot electronic stabilization, and its autofocus impresses, especially in terms of object-tracking and face recognition.

Read our in-depth Sony ZV-E10 review


The best beginner mirrorless all-rounder

Fujifilm X-S20 camera in hand

(Image credit: Future)
The best mirrorless all-rounder for learners

Specifications

Sensor size: APS-C CMOS
Resolution: 26.1MP
Viewfinder: EVF OLED, 2,360,000 dots
Monitor: 3.0inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1,840,000 dots
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8fps
Movies: 6K
User level: Intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
'Open gate' 6K video
+
Excellent handling
+
Incredible battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
No weather-proofing
-
Pricier than X-S10
Buy it if:

You want a camera you can grow into: There's plenty of beginner-friendly controls and features, plus image quality will continue to satisfy as your photo skills improve.

You mix up between photo and video: Excellent photos and an almost over the top 6K video spec.

Don't buy it if:

You want class-leading autofocus: Fujifilm’s subject-tracking autofocus is edged out by the likes of the Sony A6600 and Nikon Z50.

❌ You don't shoot a lot of video: Arguably if video isn't your thing, you could save a bunch by opting for the older X-S10 instead. 

The X-S20 builds on the already impressive Fujifilm X-S10 – which has the X-T4's 26MP APS-C sensor in a smaller and simpler body – by offering a significantly improved battery life and 6K video chops that is almost overboard for a beginner-level camera. In fact, the X-S20 evolves the range to a more enthusiast-level and feels like a different proposition, and it's pricier for it.

That's not to say beginners are left out – the X-S20 user experience is well suited for newbies, with plenty of auto photography control, a vlogging mode, plus improved subject tracking autofocus. You don't get the retro shooting mode dials like in the XT30 II (see above), but you do get a lovely vari-angle touch screen and chunky grip that makes the X-S20 a lovely everyday camera. 

We still get Fujifilm's Film Simulation modes for a variety of looks, and image and video quality is stellar, especially when using one of Fujifilm's excellent X-series lenses. The X-S10 remains on sale despite being updated by the X-S20, and the former remains a compelling choice especially because it's so much cheaper. If you don't need the improved video quality, battery life and refined autofocus, you can save a fair bit by opting for the X-S10.

Read our in-depth Fujifilm X-S20 review


The best beginner mirrorless camera for wildlife

The Canon EOS R7 camera sitting on a stone step

(Image credit: Future)
The best beginner mirrorless camera for wildlife shooting

Specifications

Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 32.5MP
Viewfinder: 2,360K dots
Monitor: 2.95-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1,620K dots
Autofocus: 651-area Dual Pixel II AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 15fps
Movies: 4K at 60p
User level: Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Rapid burst-shooting speeds
+
Excellent autofocus and stabilization

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited range of native lenses
-
Average electronic viewfinder
Buy it if:

✅ You're on a budget and like action photography: With excellent subject-tracking and eye-recognition AF, the EOS R7 is a game-changer for Canon enthusiasts shooting action.

✅ You want a small, travel-friendly all-rounder: The EOS R7 with 18-150mm kit lens is a compact package ideal for travelling.

Don't buy it if:

You’re frustrated by the lack of native RF-S lenses: Sports and wildlife shooters are better served by Sony and Fujifilm APS-C systems with superior selection of lenses.

❌ You crave full-frame or low-light excellence: There are lots of advantages to APS-C sensors, but some beginners will simply want to jump in with full-frame camera.

The EOS R7 is a little pricier than its beginner-friendly stablemate, the EOS R10 (see no.1 above). But it also brings a lengthy list of improvements that'll give you more room to grow into, including in-body image stabilization, a better viewfinder, a larger buffer for burst shooting, weather-sealing and uncropped 4K/60p video. If you like to shoot moving subjects or video, it's likely the better choice – as long as you can justify its slightly more mid-range price tag.

While you can't expect full-frame performance from the EOS R7, we found that its smaller APS-C was capable of producing excellent images in a range of conditions. Importantly for beginners and solo filmmakers, its Dual Pixel CMOS AF II autofocus was particularly impressive during our time with the camera: besides intelligent subject tracking, face and eye-detection were capable of locking onto animals rapidly, reliably and with impressive accuracy.

Action shooters will also appreciate its speedy continuous frame rates for capturing action – up to 15fps with the mechanical shutter, or 30fps if you switch to electronic. The only real downside? A lack of native RF-S lenses. Only two are currently available, and safari photographers may find the 18-150mm telephoto doesn’t quite get them close enough.

Read our in-depth Canon EOS R7 review


The best retro beginner mirrorless camera

The Nikon Z fc, one of the best beginner mirrorless cameras, camera on a park bench

(Image credit: Future)
A retro mirrorless hybrid with beginner-friendly controls

Specifications

Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 20.9MP
Viewfinder: EVF, 2,360K dots
Monitor: 3.0-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1,040K dots
Autofocus: 209-point AF
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 11fps
Movies: 4K at 30p
User level: Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Stunning retro design
+
Vari-angle touchscreen

Reasons to avoid

-
Lack of native lenses
-
No UHS-II card support
Buy it if:

✅ You like looking at your camera: The Nikon Zfc is a retro-chice beauty, whether you are a Nikon fan or not.

✅ You want a mix of old and new: The vari-angle touch screen transforms the Z fc from old to new; tucked away you can pretend there's no screen at all.

Don't buy it if:

You want bullet proof build quality: It may look like the Nikon FM2 analog camera, but the casual Z fc is a different prospect in regards to build quality.

❌ You need a wide choice of lenses: Nikon is yet to fill out the lens range for it's APS-C mirrorless cameras, although there is at least the 24mm f/1.7 prime lens now.

It's a close call between the Nikon Z fc and the Nikon Z50 for a place in this list, but think this gloriously retro model just edges it. Both cameras are based on the same photographic engine and fans of DSLR-style deep grips will likely prefer the Z50, but we found the Z fc's style and useful dials to be better for beginners who have just picked up the hobby or are just starting to expand their photography skills.

The Z fc is a fine all-rounder thanks to its 20.9MP APS-C sensor and hybrid autofocus system. It can also shoot 4K/30p video and has a vari-angle touchscreen to help you shoot from different angles, including front-on to the camera. 

The only real downsides we've found here are a lack of weather-sealing and relatively limited collection of native lenses. That said, there are now an increasing number of third-party lenses from the likes of Viltrox, and those physical controls are ideal for anyone who wants to get up to speed with the exposure triangle.

Read our in-depth Nikon Z fc review


The best cheap beginner mirrorless camera

Panasonic Lumix GX9, one of the best beginner mirrorless cameras, next to a camera bag

(Image credit: Future)
The best cheap beginner mirrorless camera

Specifications

Sensor size: Micro Four Thirds
Resolution: 20.3MP
Viewfinder: EVF, 2,764,800 dots
Monitor: 3-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,240,000 dots
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 9fps/30fps
Movies: 4K
User level: Beginner/intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Built-in viewfinder
+
5-axis dual IS

Reasons to avoid

-
Functional not stylish
-
Still only 16 megapixels
Buy it if:

✅ You want a discreet street snapper: The GX9 is a positively tiny MFT camera with large touchscreen, responsive autofocus and excellent in-body stablization.

✅ You want a bargain: The low price of the GX9 together with an excellent range of high-quality low cost lenses make this an perfect system to start with.

Don't buy it if:

You want the best image quality: There are other cameras in this guide with better outright image quality, although the GX9 does have superb lenses.

❌ You want to make big photos: Of all the cameras in this guide, 16MP makes for the smallest photo size. 

The Lumix GX9 from Panasonic represents excellent value for money. Its small size and weight not only make it ideal for those new to an interchangeable lens camera, but it's also well-suited for travel photography, too. The great feature set includes a built-in viewfinder, plus 5-axis dual image stabilization. It proved to be a very capable entry-level mirrorless camera during our tests as well. It was able to shoot up to 9fps on burst mode and achieve pleasingly sharp shots at 1/8 sec thanks to its image stabilization.

One of our favorite features of all Panasonic cameras is the 4K Video and 4K Photo Modes. You can use the latter to extract stills from a movie to in order to freeze the perfect moment. As standard, the GX9 comes with a 12-32mm lens, which is a good optic to get you started with. Further good news is that there are dozens of different lenses available in the Micro Four Thirds mount, so this is a camera you can truly grow with.

Read our in-depth Panasonic Lumix GX9 review


The best beginner mirrorless camera with fast AF

Sony A6100, one of the best beginner mirrorless cameras, on a wooden table

(Image credit: Future)
Still a great beginner option for shooting moving subjects

Specifications

Sensor size: APS-C
Resolution: 24.2MP
Viewfinder: EVF, 1,440,000 dots
Monitor: 3-inch tilting, 921,600 dots
Maximum continuous shooting rate: 11fps
Movies: 4K
User level: Beginner/Intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Great range of specs
+
Value for money

Reasons to avoid

-
Fiddly buttons 
-
Small viewfinder 
-
Fairly pricey 
Buy it if:

✅ You want to shoot all day: Sony's excellent battery gives class-leading, long-lasting performance.

✅ You want a decent lens choice: Sony has a much wider range of high-quality APS-C mirrorless lenses than rivals Canon and Nikon.

Don't buy it if:

You shoot action: The A6100's processing power limits is ability to keep going for continuous high-speed photos.

❌ You default to the touchscreen: The functions of the A6100 touch screen are extremely limited compared to rivals and recent Sony models. 

Sony's A6000 was one of the most popular mirrorless models of the past few years, and while you can still buy it, the brand has refreshed it in the shape of the A6100. That brings a whole set of new features to Sony's entry-level offering, including improved video features which now include 4K. You also get a touch-sensitive screen and advanced autofocus options which include the very well-performing Eye AF (for both humans and animals). 

Settling on continuous AF with the 'Tracking: Expand Flexible Spot' focus area during our tests, we actually forgot that it's an entry-level mirrorless camera because of how fast, intuitive, and spot-on its autofocusing is. An extensive range of different lenses are available for Sony's mount, so it's also a system you can be confident when investing in. As it stands, the A6100 is one of the most expensive models on this list – but the good news is that if you're happy with older tech, the A6000 is still very much available, and right now is a veritable bargain.

Read our in-depth Sony Alpha A6100 review


How to choose the best beginner mirrorless camera

Just because something is 'cheap', that doesn't necessarily mean it represents value for money. If you find you quickly outgrow it and need to upgrade very soon, then you'll end up spending even more money. Some of the cameras here might seem expensive to somebody buying their first camera, but we will have recommended them as something that should last you for many years to come.

If you view your photography hobby as an investment, it will pay huge dividends if you can invest as much as you possibly can when you first get started. Inexpensive cameras can still do a good job, but when cutting back on price inevitably means that features and controls are missing – so ask yourself if the saving is worth missing out on something you think you'll need.

The Canon EOS R10 camera sitting on a wooden bench

(Image credit: Future)

For example, the cheapest mirrorless cameras don’t usually have viewfinders, but these can be invaluable for shooting in bright light, when the screen on the back can easily suffer from glare and reflections, so we’d always recommend stretching to a camera with a viewfinder if you can.

Mirrorless cameras usually ship with either an APS-C or a slightly smaller Micro Four Thirds Sensor. Both represent a significant step up in resolution and image quality when compared to the small sensors found in a smartphone or compact camera, and the larger size means they also serve up superior low-light performance.

The importance of other features will depend on your shooting style. Those looking to try out vlogging will welcome the excellent video specs of several cameras above, while in-body image stabilization will be a useful addition for those looking to shoot hand-held.

Swipe to scroll horizontally
Which beginner mirrorless camera is for you?
If you need...Pick this cameraLaunch price
The best range of lensesFujifilm X-T30 II$899 / £749 / AU$1,585
The best autofocus systemCanon EOS R10$979 / £899 / AU$1,499
The best video featuresSony ZV-E10$700 / £680 / AU$1,249
A full-frame cameraNikon Z5$1,699 / £1,719 / AU$3,099 (with kit lens)
Classic, retro looksNikon Z fc$959 / £899 / AU$1,499
A small, affordable cameraPanasonic Lumix GX9$999 (with kit lens) / £699 / AU$1,399 (with kit lens)

You might want a camera that can shoot 4K, and not all of them can. Although it's becoming more common, it's still a somewhat new area for entry-level mirrorless cameras, and they don’t all do it (though they do all offer regular 1920 x 1080 Full HD).

Check out the specs of the rear screens, too. The size and resolution are not so important since they’re all quite similar these days, but a touchscreen display will make the camera feel more like a phone, making the transition to using a "proper" camera a little easier since you'll already be used to tapping, swiping and so on.

All the mirrorless cameras we’ve chosen for this list are well suited to beginners because of their price, size, ease of use, features or all of those things. You can also take a look at our other buying guides below if you're still undecided. Otherwise, read on to see the 10 best entry-level mirrorless cameras you can buy right now. 

What camera should a beginner start with?

That really depends on what you'd like to do. An entry-level mirrorless camera is best if you want to up your photography game for social media or if you want to expand your photography skills. 

The beauty of most beginner mirrorless cameras is that they come bundled with a ‘kit’ lens to cover the most common shooting scenarios to get you started and give you enough flexibility to experiment with depth of field. 

As you progress, you should be able to expand your shooting setup since these camera bodies are compatible with at least one of that manufacturer's family of lenses.