Prime Minister David Cameron is fronting a government campaign to require providers of public Wi-Fi hotspots to block pornography and other adult content.

The PM will announce a proposed 'code of conduct' for ISPs following concerns from children's charities, that kids are inadvertently (or not) accessing porn on Wi-Fi in cafes, shops and other public areas.

Cameron told the Telegraph: "We are promoting good, clean, Wi-Fi in local cafes and elsewhere to make sure that people have confidence in public Wi-Fi systems so that they are not going to see things they shouldn't."

BT, the nation's biggest public Wi-Fi provider does offer content filtering options to its partners, meaning individual stores or restaurants can choose whether they want to allow adult content, but Cameron wants a blanket ban.

Taking the lead

On the other hand Sky, which owns public Wi-Fi provider The Cloud, said it has led the way on censoring inappropriate content.

Users must go out of their way to override the default network settings in order access smut through the service. Too much hassle, man.

A Sky spokesperson told The Register: "The Cloud already automatically filters adult content in public places. This is something we are proud to have led the way on.

"We believe that parents want peace of mind that their children cannot inadvertently access adult material when out of home. That's why we were the first Wi-Fi provider to apply content filters as default across our entire network."

It's not the first time this government has launched a crusade against pornography. Up until very recently, it was in favour of a blanket pornography ban across all ISPs with customers having to opt-in to view adult websites.

Via The Register