Skip to main content

Best 55-inch 4K TVs to buy in 2022

PRICE
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
Best 55-inch 4K TVs against orange background
(Image credit: Future)

The best 55-inch 4K TVs should be the first screens you consider in your quest to buy the perfect television for your home. 

As the closest thing we have to a standard-size television, the 55-inch TVs are the size at which premium TV technologies start making an appearance. Sure, you can get a 40-inch TV with 4K and features like full array local dimming, but they're much more common (and effective) in a 55-inch TV. 

There's a reason most OLED and Mini LED TVs tend to start at a 55-inch TV size too – why put all that expense and effort into a screen so compact that you don't get the benefit of a high-end panel or complex and hefty backlight?

It's possible to go for larger 65-inch TVs or 75-inch TVs for more screen real estate, or  you can always consider the best small TV guide for something more compact. For most people though, the best 55-inch 4K TVs will do the job, combining good prices and great screen space too.

Here are our top picks – each of which has been thoroughly tested to ensure you only get one of the best 55-inch TVs. Be sure to check page regularly, though, as new TVs are releasing all the time to dethrone the previous screen champions.

The best 55-inch 4K TVs of 2022

The Samsung QN95A 55-inch 4K TV shows birds flying against yellow sky

(Image credit: Samsung)
The arrival of Mini LED elevates Samsung to new heights

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel technology: Neo QLED
Smart TV: Tizen
Dimensions: 1227.4 x 706.2 x 25.9 mm

Reasons to buy

+
Stellar picture quality
+
Impressive sound system

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision or Atmos
-
Freeview Play would be nice

The Samsung QN95A is the company’s new flagship Neo QLED 4K TV for 2022, and the first to embrace a Mini LED backlight, resulting in a significant increase in dimmable zones and thinner panels.

The results speak for themselves, with superb SDR and HDR images that benefit from deep blacks and brighter highlights, all of which are delivered without blooming or loss of shadow detail. The inclusion of quantum dot technology delivers saturated and nuanced colours, and thanks to the Filmmaker Mode these images are also extremely accurate.

Unlike last year, Samsung is not short-changing its 4K line-up in an effort to push sales of the 8K ranges. So the QN95A boasts an impressive set of features, which is headlined by a well-designed and comprehensive smart platform that includes every major streaming app. 

There’s also a host of cutting-edge gaming features that’ll please next-gen console owners, and a powerful 4.2.2-channel sound system packed into the TV’s ultra-slim chassis. Just keep in mind that you'll be making do with HDR10+ support rather than the more prevalent Dolby Vision HDR standard.

Read the full review: Samsung QN95A Neo QLED TV

The 55-inch LG C1 OLED with pink tree onscreen

(Image credit: LG)
A spectacular (if iterative) OLED TV

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: webOS
Dimensions: 1228 x 706 x 46.9 mm

Reasons to buy

+
Beautiful 4K/HDR picture
+
WebOS is fantastic

Reasons to avoid

-
Reflective glass surface
-
No HDR10+

For those tempted by the deep blacks and infinite contrast of an OLED TV, the LG C1 Series is your best bet.

The new a9 Gen 4 chipset adds in AI processing to between distinguish between objects and their backgrounds – something that's at the heart of a lot of advancements in today's TV market. This stellar OLED TV packs in four dedicated HDMI 2.1 ports (ideal for next-gen gaming) and even comes with a new Game Optimiser menu that gives you the option to quickly adjust brightness, contrast and VRR on the fly.

The LG C1 isn’t flawless, as we did encounter issues around how the new a9 Gen 4 processor upscales faces, and how reflective the all-glass screen is during daylight hours, but the issues are few and far between. (The step-up LG G1 OLED offers even more brightness too, for those able to double their budget for a 55-inch 4K TV.)

Read the full review: LG C1 OLED

TCL's 55-inch 4K TV hanging above shelving and storage

(Image credit: TCL)
TCL’s affordable 6-Series is a beacon of hope for budget buyers

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Panel technology: LED
Smart TV: Roku TV
Dimensions: 1,239 x 717 x 36 mm

Reasons to buy

+
Bright, colorful HDR
+
Roku TV is amazing

Reasons to avoid

-
Upscaling isn’t world-class
-
Poor black level performance

While we could easily fill this list with TVs that cost thousands, we try to measure screens by how well they perform for their price – and, by that metric, there are few TVs better than the TCL 6-Series QLED (55R625), one of the best TCL TVs out there.

Thanks to the addition of Quantum Dots, the 6-Series is more colorful than ever before and the new AIPQ engine makes upscaled content look even better than last year, too. It may not be able to output the same peak brightness as QLED TVs from Samsung and Vizio, but it costs less than half of the competition. We can't recommend it highly enough.

Read the full review: TCL 6-Series (R625)

The 55-inch Sony A90J with adjustable feet

(Image credit: Sony)
Sony advances the art of OLED with the A90J

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 83-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: OLED
Smart TV: Google TV
Dimensions: 1223 x 709 x 41 mm

Reasons to buy

+
Robust sound
+
Nice new OS

Reasons to avoid

-
No UK catch-up TV services
-
Missing some key features

The Sony A90J is more than a few steps ahead when it comes to sound quality. Using the entire surface of the screen as a speaker is still novel and effective, and backing it up with two conventional bass drivers means the A90J sounds fuller, more direct and just, well, better than any alternative that doesn’t feature an off-board sound system.

Picture quality, from any source, is about as good as it currently gets from any 4K screen. In every meaningful department – motion control, contrast, edge definition, detail levels, you name it. For those moments when you’re reduced to watching sub-4K content, it’s great at upscaling, too. 

Add in a smart new Google TV interface, the usual Sony standard of build and finish, feet that change position to accommodate a soundbar, an exclusive movie streaming service, and an authentically well-designed remote control – ignoring the inexplicable lack of UK TV catch-up services – and the A90J looks like the complete package. Although complete packages seldom come cheap.

Read the full review: Sony A90J OLED TV review

Panasonic JZ2000 OLED TV in white living room

(Image credit: Panasonic)
A cinematic OLED TV with speakers to match the screen

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel technology: OLED
Smart TV: My Home Screen 6.0
Dimensions: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Side-firing speakers
+
Four HDMI 2.1 inputs

Reasons to avoid

-
Bulky remote
-
Not a slim TV

The Panasonic JZ2000 OLED is a force to be reckoned with. With its Master HDR OLED Professional Edition panel, an overhauled sound system that belts Dolby Atmos sound out of every corner, and a boost to gaming specs and HDMI 2.1 connectivity, this flagship 2021 screen is easily one of the best TVs we’ve ever had the pleasure of reviewing.

It’s the small changes that mark out the JZ2000 over its predecessor, the (also five-star) HZ2000. You’ll now find HDMI 2.1 inputs, along with VRR (variable refresh rate), ALLM (auto low latency mode) and a reduced input lag of just 14.4ms – making this a much better bet for hooking up to a PS5 or Xbox Series X console.

While the small drop in overall audio output may sound like a loss to some, the 125W on show here is certainly enough to blast your eardrums into next week (if that’s what you’re after). 

We could barely get above the halfway point on this screen’s volume, while the redistribution of drivers to emit sound out of the sides only improves the spread of sound around your living room or home cinema cave. If you don't need that much sound, though, we can also recommend the step-down JZ1000 for a lot less cash.

Read our full review: Panasonic JZ2000 review

LG Gallery G1 OLED

(Image credit: LG)
LG's picture-on-wall design is gorgeous... but expensive

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Panel technology: OLED
Smart TV: WebOS
Dimensions: 1225 x 706 x 23.1 mm (W x H x D)

Reasons to buy

+
Outstanding contrast
+
Impressively thin design

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive compared to C1
-
Sound system struggles with bass

After a flatscreen TV that's a bit more stylish? The LG G1 OLED is a knockout television that builds on the sleek design of last year's Gallery Series OLED and somehow makes it better.

The real hero here is LG's new OLED evo technology, which updates the panel structure to eke out even more brightness – without increasing blooming effects or, we're told, the chance of burn-in. The LG G1 looks to be a real revolution for the OLED TV maker, then, and certainly offers an upgrade over the cheaper LG C1 OLED – unlike last year, when the CX and GX models were worlds apart in price but effectively offered the same picture performance.

It's an expensive set, and the Dolby Atmos sound system isn't the best for bass – something that will effect all the other LG OLEDs in this guide. But the breathtakingly slim design makes it a real centerpiece television, with the contrast and color benefits of OLED pushed to new, lighting-enhanced heights. The new a9 Gen 4 AI processor is even more capable of smartly upscaling and processing onscreen objects, too, with motion processing in particular getting an upgrade.

Watch out though: the G1 is really designed to be wall-mounted, and it won't come with a TV stand or feet out of the box. You can buy a floorstanding Gallery Stand alongside, or find a third-party solution for placing on a counter, though.

Read more: LG G1 OLED TV review

55-inch Philips OLED 805 glows blue with Ambilight projection

(Image credit: Philips)
Gorgeous Ambilight colors with an OLED panel? Count us in

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Panel technology: OLED
Smart TV: Android
Dimensions: 1228 x 706 x 58mm (HxWxD)

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent picture quality
+
Extensive specification

Reasons to avoid

-
Difficult setup process
-
Not the slimmest OLED

With the OLED806, Philips has delivered a good-looking, well-made OLED TV with an absolute stack of functionality, a unique selling point and periodically splendid picture quality. And it’s done all this for a real-world price.

Including every HDR standard isn’t unique - Panasonic does it too - but it certainly makes every other rival look a bit petty. A couple of HDMI inputs with full 2.1 specification is no more than next-gen gamers deserve. And the excellent picture quality - balanced and naturalistic, yet vibrant and exciting at the same time - is augmented by four-sided Ambilight for extra immersion and reduced eye-strain. 

What with this being an OLED panel, we’re entitled to expect clean, deep and lustrous black tones - and, sure enough, that’s what we’re given. But they’re revealing and consistent too, with a deeply impressive amount of detail and variation with them. And they’re complemeted at the other end of the spectrum by clear and equally detailed white tones - the Philips doesn’t use one of the most recent super-bright OLED panels enjoyed by pricier 2021 models from LG and Sony, but it’s capable of punchy and convincing contrasts nevertheless.

Read more: Philips OLED806 review

55-inch Hisense TV shows swirling paint-like colors

(Image credit: Hisense)
A quality budget TV

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: ULED (LED-LCD)
Smart TV: Android TV
Dimensions: 53.6 x 33 x 6.4 inches

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent image quality
+
Android TV is solid

Reasons to avoid

-
Remote is a bit much
-
Buy a soundbar

The Hisense U6G may not offer all the fancy bells and whistles that you would expect from more expensive options, but it still offers an excellent image quality for a TV in this price range. 

To wit, those features include support for Dolby Vision, HDR10+, and more. The TV offers up to 600 nits of brightness, which is fine for most situations, and while panels on this TV may not be overly consistent, under normal viewing you won’t really notice any blotchiness or blooming.

The TV comes with Google’s Android TV, which is getting more and more responsive as TVs get more powerful. It’s not bad here at all, and while you may still have to wait a second or two every now and then, for the most part, you’ll be able to get where you need to in a timely matter.

You can’t do much better in this price range, especially if you either like Android TV or plan on using an external streaming device. Most competitors either don’t offer local dimming, don’t get as bright, or offer an inferior software experience. 

Read our full Hisense U6G ULED TV review

Best 55-inch TV FAQ

What is the best 55-inch smart TV?

Right now, that's the Samsung QN95A, which tops our best 55-inch TV guide. But its pricing and Mini LED system mean it won't be the best choice for everyone – those of you who prefer OLED pictures, or just something a bit cheaper, have plenty of options that will sit right at home in your, well, home.

How much should you pay for a 55-inch TV?

55-inch TVs can be very cheap, with some budget LCD models costing just $400 / £400 – though that number will double for mod mid-tier options, if not triple and quadruple for high-end screens with OLED panels or Mini LED backlighting. A brand new 55-inch OLED will usually cost around $1,799 / £1,799, for example.

Is a 55-inch smart TV big enough?

55-inch TVs are the flagship size for today's televisions. That makes it pretty much the most common sizing option. It's a kind of happy medium between 32-inch small TVs and massive 75-inch TVs.

It's worth thinking hard about how important screen size is to you, though. You'll likely pay less for smaller screens, as with the 48-inch OLED TVs that generally offer premium TV tech for less, or the lower-spec models found at 40-inch sizes.

However, larger screens are increasingly becoming the norm for those that can fit them into their home, and mass production means a big-screen display isn't quite the bank-breaking cost that it used to be.

A bigger screen means more detail that's more easily visible at a larger distance – ideal for family movie nights or those after a truly impactful home cinema. Keep in mind though that picture defects are also more visible at larger sizes, so you should make sure that you're getting a TV good enough to warrant a step-up screen size.

What should I look for in a 55-inch TV?

At this ample size, you should absolutely be looking for some good features – lest you get stuck with a large screen that simply blows up artefacts and visual defects.

OLED or Mini LED screens are well worth getting at this size, without the truly extravagant price points of larger models – 55 inch TVs offer a smart, well-judged entry point to premium TV tech. For LCD models, you want to make sure you're getting Direct Full Array Lighting, rather than the edge-lighting still found on some budget sets – and which limits the consistency of brightness across the screen.

Otherwise, 4K HDR is a given, and you may want to check that HDMI 2.1 is included if you're partial to gaming, with the VRR (variable refresh rate) and ALLM (auto low latency mode) support usually thrown in.

Nick Pino
Nick Pino

Nick Pino is the Senior Editor of Home Entertainment at TechRadar and covers TVs, headphones, speakers, video games, VR and streaming devices. He's written for TechRadar, GamesRadar, Official Xbox Magazine, PC Gamer and other outlets over the last decade, and he has a degree in computer science he's not using if anyone wants it.

With contributions from