The best OLED TV 2022: top OLED panels from LG, Sony and more

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REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
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REASONS TO BUY
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best OLED TV against a techradar background
(Image credit: Future)
Editor's Note: November 2022

Thanks to its wide range of sizes, excellent future-proof features, and recent price drops the LG C2 has held its place as our number one OLED TV pick, despite some hot competition from the first QD-OLED TV: the Samsung S95B.

The S95B image quality is extraordinary, but it lacks some of the features and size flexibility of the LG C2, and you need to tinker with the settings to get its best results, so for most people, the C2 will still be the smarter buy.

At the more affordable end, 2021's LG C1 is our pick, because you get cutting-edge features for such a great price now. For US buyers, the Vizio H1 is also worth consideration.

Matt Bolton, Senior Editor - TV & Audio

The best OLED TVs on the market today deliver beautiful image quality because of the self-lighting pixels that define this kind of technology. What these pixels allow for is rich, precise contrast for HDR in a way that even the best LCD TVs can’t match. That means they deliver an incredible cinematic picture that brings you more detail in darker areas of the screen than you’ll ever get from an LCD TV. 

With one of the best OLED TVs, many of which are among the best TVs on the market, you'll also find a starker contrast between light and dark, which is similar to the laser projection in movie theaters – especially if you buy a larger TV, like one of the best 65-inch TVs or best 75-inch TVs. Big TV brands, like LG and Sony, use OLED tech in their premium TVs. Even Samsung, a TV company that’s been holding out on OLED, entered the OLED TV space earlier this year.

We’ve tested a huge amount of TVs over the years, and have tried many of the best OLED TVs as well. And, we’re in a great position to select the best OLED TVs that'll suit a range of preferences and budgets. So, we gathered the top ones available right now.

Most of these are premium models through and though, but because the tech has been around for a few years now, you can find some fairly affordable OLED TVs these days. It's also a good time to buy a new OLED TV, because there are still Cyber Monday deals running.

For more on how this TV tech works and why it might upgrade your home cinema game, read our 'What is OLED?' guide. But the short version is that OLED TVs offer more control over how bright or dark an individual pixel can be, so you get stunning HDR and incredibly precise colors.

The best OLED TV 2022

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The lg c2 oled tv on TV bench in smart living room

(Image credit: LG)
The best OLED TV for most people

Specifications

Screen size: 42-inch, 48-inch, 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch, 83-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Beautiful 4K/HDR picture
+
Four HDMI 2.1 ports

Reasons to avoid

-
Lack of cable management
-
No HDR10+ support

The LG C2 OLED is the best OLED TV for the majority of people. While the LG C1 OLED from last year is still a great TV, and the LG G2 and Z2 offer elevated experiences compared to the C2, we wholly believe that the C2 offers the best performance-to-dollar ratio and is the TV to beat.

Improvements in this model include the new Alpha a9 Gen 5 processor, which is designed to offer better object enhancement and dynamic tone mapping than its predecessor. As well as that, you’re getting ‘virtual surround sound’, with the TV upscaling stereo content into 7.1.2-channel sound. While we weren’t convinced by the claims of virtual surround sound, the audio performance is good for a flatscreen TV, and a number of different sound modes means you should be able to find an audio profile that suits your needs. 

In addition to those improvements, the C2 OLED carries forward the four separate HDMI 2.1 ports that it inherited from the C1 OLED, meaning it's the perfect companion for the PS5, Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S. 

The LG C2 isn’t flawless, however. In our tests we found that off-axis color saturation does diminish a bit when you move to the left or right of the screen when compared to the new QD-OLED models. It's also worth noting that LG doesn't support either the IMAX Enhanced or HDR10+ format.

There are, of course, higher resolution OLED TVs out there right now like the LG Z2 OLED, which offers 8K resolution, and the new upgraded LG G2 OLED that has a slightly higher peak brightness, but for the price, we think this is the absolute best TV.

Read our full LG C2 OLED review

Vizio H1 OLED TV displaying pink flowers onscreen

(Image credit: Vizio)
The best cheap OLED TV (US only)

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: SmartCast
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision, HDR10+

Reasons to buy

+
Stunning 4K HDR pictures
+
Cheaper than LG OLED

Reasons to avoid

-
Dimmer than some OLEDs
-
HDMI 2.1 ports don't work well

The latest Vizio OLED TV – officially called the H1 – is a cheaper alternative to the more premium screens that LG and Sony have been producing for the past few years. For folks who don’t want to spend a fortune, the Vizio OLED has most of the same key features and it offers largely similar performance as other OLEDs for hundreds of dollars less – albeit with a less bright output that most other OLEDs surpass. In our tests we found it coped perfectly well with most lighting conditions short of direct sunlight beaming in.

As we said in our review, the Vizio offers exceptional black levels and an impressively thin chassis. The benefits of OLED are naturally present, too, including exceptional contrast and wider viewing angles.

The Vizio OLED is also often on sale, bringing its $1,399 price tag (for the 55-inch size) down as low as $899. This is way lower than the likes of the LG C2 above – so if you want OLED on a budget, this display truly delivers.

Read our full Vizio OLED 4K TV review

LG C1 OLED with pink tree onscreen

(Image credit: LG)
The best cheap(ish) OLED TV balancing features, picture and price

Specifications

Screen size: 48-inch, 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Beautiful 4K HDR picture
+
Four HDMI 2.1 ports
+
Great webOS interface and app support

Reasons to avoid

-
Reflective glass surface
-
No HDR10+

It's not quite as good as the C2 OLED at the top (because it has slightly older processing, and a less bright screen), but this TV from 2021 remains a fantastic purchase while stocks last, because it's had a huge reduction in price. And when it comes to features, we don't think there are any deal-breaking differences between it and newer models.

The a9 Gen 4 chipset features AI processing to distinguish between objects and their backgrounds – something that's at the heart of a lot of advancements in today's TV market – while a full suite of HDMI 2.1 ports and a dedicated Game Optimizer menu means that gamers should find using the C1 a breeze. This means you can connect four devices that do 4K 120Hz, VRR and ALLM – perfect for next-gen. This is one of the very few TVs that can handle 4K 120fps Dolby Vision gaming from the Xbox Series X.

The LG C1 isn’t flawless. During our tests we did encounter issues with the way the Gen 4 chipset upscaled faces, and the all-glass screen is perhaps too reflective during daylight hours. But these are minor concerns. As it stands, this is a huge bargain when you look at how great the image quality is, and how future-proof it still is compared to the competition, even more than a year on.

Read our full LG C1 OLED review

The Sony XR-A95K TV pictured in a grey living room displaying a blue and green abstract shot

(Image credit: Sony)
A good option for image quality if money is no object

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch and 65-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: Google TV
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Stunning picture quality
+
Exceptional build and design
+
Good sound out of the box

Reasons to avoid

-
Some connection frustrations and foibles
-
No HDR10+ support
-
Not quite as bright as hoped

The Sony A95K is an OLED TV masterpiece. It masters Quantum Dot OLED technology, combining OLED’s black level prowess and peerless light control with brightness and pure color. Sony’s excellent Cognitive XR processing engine delivers images so good we were truly shocked during our testing. We’d even say that the Sony A95K delivers arguably the most flat-out beautiful images we’ve seen from a consumer television.

Not only is the picture a sight to behold, the Sony A95K makes a statement the second we lifted it out of its box. It has a unique design with a full-width metal plate stand that you can sit behind the TV for a minimal look or in front of it for an industrial one. The build quality here is excellent, leaving you in no doubt this is one hell of a premium TV. 

Although we’d always recommend pairing your new TV with a soundbar, we found the sound of the Sony A95K to be impressive. This is because it follows previous Sony OLED TVs with Acoustic Surface technology, where the TV’s screen essentially doubles up as its speakers.

As you might expect from such a premium experience, it has an eye-watering price tag to match. The 65-inch version will set you back $3,999 / £3,499 / AU$5,995. That’s nearly a whole $1000 / £1000 more than some of our other favorite OLED TVs on this list, like the LG C2 OLED and the Samsung 65S95B. So although it’s truly deserving of being in our best OLED TV guide for its outstanding picture quality, only those willing to spend a small fortune should consider it. 

Read our full Sony XR-A95K review

The Samsung S95B OLED TV on a TV stand.

(Image credit: Samsung)
The best OLED TV for mind-blowing colors

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: QD-OLED
Smart TV: Tizen
HDR: HDR10, HLG, HDR10+

Reasons to buy

+
Astounding color and contrast
+
Beautiful ultra-slim design

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision support
-
Image needs tweaking to perfect it

The Samsung S95B is the first QD-OLED TV we tested – a new technology that combines the per-pixel lighting control and contrast that OLED is famed for, with the rich Quantum Dot color technology that makes Samsung's QLED TVs so coveted.

The S95B is a dazzling debut for this tech, and it's not just about the next-gen screen. As we said in our review: "This TV has had the kitchen sink thrown at it, with Samsung's latest AI-inspired picture processor, a massively comprehensive and re-designed Tizen-based smart system, the latest gaming features, and even, despite the ultra-slim design, a clever object tracking sound audio system."

We loved all of that stuff, but the star remains the image quality, which we said offers a "combination of brightness, black depth, contrast and color that we just haven’t seen before on a consumer set. It's something special."

When you throw in sound that follows what's happening on screen, excellent upscaling and detail, comprehensive streaming support, and support for all the latest HDMI 2.1 gaming features (including 4K 120Hz and Variable Refresh Rates), it's absolutely one of the best TVs available today. That said, it's certainly not a cheap buy, and the lack of Dolby Vision (standard on all Samsung TVs) is a shame. But with colors this good, you'll get over it.

Read our full Samsung S95B review

The LG G2 Gallery Series TV hanging on the wall.

(Image credit: LG)
The best premium OLED TV for sheer image quality

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch, 83-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: OLED evo
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Gorgeously bright, vibrant pictures
+
Beautiful premium design

Reasons to avoid

-
No stand in the box
-
No HDR10+ support

If price isn't a concern for you and you simply want the best OLED TV you can buy at any price point, then the LG G2 OLED is the TV for you. The OLED65G2 uses its extra brightness to make pretty much every frame of any source you care to mention look even more sublime than it has on any LG OLED before.

Although the G2 OLED shares the same ‘Gallery’ design name as its GX and G1 predecessors, it actually looks completely different: gone is the dark frame and chamfered edges, in is a nifty two-layer effect where a thin black rear ‘slab’ sits proud of and slightly narrower than a chunkier front tier housing the screen that’s encased in a very fetching and opulent-looking silver metal coat. 

The quality of the G2 OLED’s connections is beyond reproach. In particular, all four of its HDMI ports are capable of handling the maximum 48Gbps of data supported by the HDMI 2.1 standard. This means that hardcore video gamers could simultaneously attach an Xbox Series XPS5 and cutting-edge PC graphics rig to enjoy full-fat 4K at 120Hz, variable refresh rates and automatic low latency mode switching from all of them. That, plus you'll still have one HDMI left for adding a 4K Blu-ray player or streaming box.

To anyone familiar with LG’s OLED TVs over the years, the impact made by the extra brightness the heat sink unlocks is instantly obvious: we found that the extra brightness gives colors more volume and punch, regardless of whether you’re talking about a very vibrant, rich tone, or a subtle, mild one. 

The end result is an OLED TV so supreme that it just barely misses the mark of our number one spot – only because its price puts it a bit far out of reach for the average TV watcher. Cinephiles, however, should certainly invest.

Read our full LG G2 OLED TV review

LG A2 OLED TV angled left showing smart interface

(Image credit: Future)
LG's best OLED TV for budget buyers

Specifications

Screen size: 48-inch (UK), 55-inch, 65-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: OLED
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Deep blacks and detailed shadows
+
Accurate out-of-box color (Filmmaker mode)
+
Affordable for an OLED TV

Reasons to avoid

-
Lacks higher-level gaming features
-
Limited brightness compared with top OLED TVs
-
Unimpressive audio performance

LG's A2 series TVs are the firm's cheapest OLED offerings, and while they're not quite as feature-rich as their more expensive stablemates they still deliver a lot of TV for the money. LG's OLED panels are wonderful things with superb color and contrast, and while the panel here isn't as bright as the ones in more expensive LG TVs it's still very good and very clear. It also has LG's webOS smart TV operating system, which we think is the best in the business.

The A2 series is outfitted with LG’s  α7 Gen 5 AI Processor, which first appeared in the company’s 2021 models and provides features such as dynamic tone mapping and 5.1.2-channel sound upmixing. The Dolby Vision, HDR10, and HLG high dynamic range formats are all supported by the A2 series, along with Dolby Vision IQ and HGiG (HDR Gaming Interest Group). Its Filmmaker mode delivers accurate color and motion settings, and also shuts off any automatic processing that would change the picture from the way a movie’s director originally intended for it to be presented.

Overall, the A2 series is relatively low on features compared to both LG’s other OLED TVs and the best 4K TVs generally. The main differences are in gaming-related specs such as HDMI 2.1 inputs, a 120Hz display, VRR (Variable Refresh Rate), and FreeSync, all of which are available on the company’s step-up B2 series TVs. If you don't need the gaming features, though, this is a very impressive and affordable TV.

Read our full LG A2 (OLED55A2) review

Sony A80K series OLED Google TV interface

(Image credit: Future)
A mid-range OLED TV with top-tier performance

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: OLED
Smart TV: Google TV
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Deep blacks and impressive brightness
+
Accurate out of box color (Cinema mode)
+
Strong suite of HDMI 2.1 gaming features

Reasons to avoid

-
Brightness a notch below the top OLED TVs
-
Overly simple remote lacks backlighting
-
No HDR10+ support

The Sony A80K is a mid-range option that delivers all the best things you expect from an OLED TV: detailed blacks and well-saturated color, 4K 120Hz support for gaming and Sony’s Acoustic Surface Audio+ tech. It's a compelling, high-performance, though not bank-breaking, OLED TV option.

A new wide color gamut panel for the A80K combines with Sony’s XR OLED Contrast Pro, XR Triluminos Pro, and Cognitive Processor XR features to deliver deep blacks and detailed shadows in images, along with rich, fully saturated colors. Overall picture brightness is satisfactory, if a bit below what you’ll get from the very best OLED TVs, such as the LG G2 and also the LG C2 series. Still, Sony’s mid-tier OLED manages to look great even in well-lit rooms, and it stuns in ones that are dimmed for best-quality movie viewing.

In our tests we were pleasantly surprised by the Acoustic Surface Audio+, which has five actuators – three directly behind the screen, and two at the sides – that vibrate it to create full-range sound, accompanied by two subwoofers for enhanced bass. This is that rare thing, a TV that doesn't have us recommending a soundbar as a must-have: it's impressively loud and does a decent job of Dolby Atmos audio.

The main competitor here will be the LG C2, and the result of the price comparison here depends on which region you're in. The 65- and 77-inch A80K sets cost slightly less than LG’s mid-range C2 OLEDs at the same sizes in the US, while the 55-inch version is priced slightly higher than LG’s same-size C2. In the UK, the Sony is higher-priced at all sizes.

Read our full Sony A80K review

Sony TV 2021 in a living room

(Image credit: Sony)
A great OLED TV option from Sony

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 83-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: OLED
Smart TV: Google TV
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Robust sound
+
New OS is great

Reasons to avoid

-
No UK catch-up TV services
-
Missing some key features

The A90J 4K OLED TV isn't exactly cheap, but we think the performance does justify the fairly hefty price tag. Picture quality from any source is about as good as it currently gets from any 4K screen. In every meaningful department – motion control, contrast, edge definition, detail levels, you name it – we found it incredibly impressive. And for those moments when you’re reduced to watching sub-4K content, it’s great at upscaling too. 

Using the entire surface of the screen as a speaker is still novel and effective, and backing it up with two conventional bass drivers means the A90J sounds fuller, more direct and just, well, better than any alternative that doesn’t feature an off-board sound system.

Add in a smart new Google TV interface, the usual Sony standard of build and finish, feet that change position to accommodate a soundbar, an exclusive movie streaming service, and an authentically well-designed remote control – ignoring the inexplicable lack of UK TV catch-up services – we think that the A90J delivers the complete package. 

Read our full Sony A90J OLED TV review

Panasonic JZ2000 OLED TV in white living room

(Image credit: Panasonic)
A cinematic OLED TV with speakers to match the screen

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: My Home Screen 6.0
HDR: HDR10+ Adaptive, HDR10, HLG, DolbyVision IQ, HLG

Reasons to buy

+
Side-firing speakers feel immersive
+
Four HDMI 2.1 inputs

Reasons to avoid

-
Bulky remote
-
Not a slim TV

The Panasonic JZ2000 OLED is a force to be reckoned with. With its Master HDR OLED Professional Edition panel, an overhauled sound system that belts Dolby Atmos sound out of every corner, and a boost to gaming specs and HDMI 2.1 connectivity, this flagship 2021 screen is easily one of the best TVs we’ve ever had the pleasure of reviewing.

In our review we highly rated this TV, especially for cinephiles with its custom panel that's able to up the average and peak brightness usually possible through an OLED screen. Just make sure you turn off Intelligent Frame Creation before you get started (as it adds some video noise in places).

But it's also a solid option for gamers, we wrote: "Input lag is better than ever before on a Panasonic OLED, while the addition of VRR, ALLM, and other HDMI 2.1 specifications means this could make a solid gaming TV." That reduced input lag is just 14.4ms, which makes this a great bet for hooking up next-gen consoles, like the PS5 or Xbox Series X console. 

The audio is incredibly powerful here too, with 125W speakers that include side-firing drivers to help spread sound all around the room. It's a solid option if you're looking for an all-in-one cinema and don't necessarily want to spend extra on a soundbar. 

Read our full Panasonic JZ2000 review

How to pick the best OLED TV for you

If you're looking for the best OLED TV for you, there are lots of things to consider. We'd recommend starting with the basics and deciding what budget you have to work with and what size TV you need. 

Sure you might be able to bump up your budget a little if you find the perfect TV – or find a good OLED TV in the Black Friday sales – but it's always wise to set yourself a limit to begin with so you don't fall in love with the unrivalled images and features of a TV that's high-end and totally out of your price range. 

In our guide above, you won't find dirt cheap TVs, but some are better value than others. Especially those that are a year or two old but don't have significant upgrades worthy of a much higher price tag.

In terms of size, you'll need to literally measure the space you have to work with. Remember a TV that fills every available scrap of space in your living room might sound like a great idea, but you'll need to consider viewing angles, brightness and whether you'll be able to get a decent distance from the TV to fully appreciate it. 

From there, we'd also advise you check out the HDR capabilities of any new TV – we've detailed these under each OLED TV in our guide – and the smart TV platform each offers. It's also worth considering sound. If you're willing to spend extra on a soundbar, don't pay too much attention to the audio on offer. If you'd like an all-in-one cinema system, consider an OLED TV that delivers great audio as well as a fantastic picture. 

The LG Rollable OLED pictured in a living room as a man watches it from a chair

(Image credit: LG)

How much do OLED TVs cost?

The cost of OLED TVs varies hugely depending on what technologies are thrown in with an OLED panel, such as the resolution, processor, build quality, built-in speakers, and more. But suffice to say that entry-level models sit around (or, more recently, just under) the $1,000 / £1,000 / AU$1,500 mark.

More mid-tier OLEDs at larger sizes (65 inches and above) can double that figure, or even triple it – while experimental 'rollable OLED" screens can go for six-figure sums. 48-inch OLED sizes tend to offer only a small discount, if any, though we could see the long-teased 42-inch OLEDs drop launch prices further, if they ever materialise.

Sales periods like Prime Day or Black Friday can help with this, though the most savings tend to come on models that are a year or two old. It's worth paying attention to these discounted screens, though, as they'll often carry better processing than newly-launched models at the same price.

Should I buy OLED or QLED?

OLED isn't the only option for savvy TV buyers. Samsung's competing QLED televisions outperform for brightness, while the introduction of Mini LED backlights has only improved light emission and overall contrast – the areas that OLED generally has the upper hand with, thanks to its per-pixel brightness control.

It's a tighter race than ever, then, though it's worth assessing secondary characteristics for OLED and QLED screens. An OLED with a cheap processor may cause more artefacts and video noise (as we saw in the LG BX), while a QLED with edge-lighting (the Q60T) won't get the true benefit of its enhanced color and contrast. Format or feature support can be crucial if you're hooking up your TV to a PC, a games console, or a 4K Blu-ray player too.

What is the lifespan of an OLED TV?

According to LG Display, the makers of the OLED panels that go into every OLED TV on the list - around 100,000 hours. For most folks that's about 10 years of TV watching and far exceeds the 40,000 to 60,000-hour lifespans of most LED-LCD TVs. That said, OLED TVs can experience something called burn-in when a static image is left on the screen for prolonged periods of time - so be sure to change the channel every few days. 

Best OLED TV competitors: what else is out there?

OLED is, for many, the premium TV tech of the moment. Though once weighed down by inaccessible price points, a flurry of cheaper mid-range OLEDs and smaller panel sizes has helped bring OLED closer to the mass market. TCL's own plans to manufacture its own inkjet OLED TV panels at a significant price reduction over traditional OLED production methods could spell trouble for the likes of LG and Panasonic too.

Samsung’s 2022 TV lineup includes QD-OLED hybrids (they combine OLED panels with quantum dot tech, utilising the self-emissive properties of the former and color enhancements of the latter) in 55- and 65-inch screen sizes, and Sony is offering similar-sized sets that use the same tech. In our hands-on test of Sony’s A95K QD-OLED, we found that its high brightness and impressive color depth gave it an edge over standard OLED models, though the picture quality boost comes at extra cost. Is QD-OLED tech worth the higher price? We’ll weigh in on that after we get a TV in-hand for a full-scale review.

For those with cash to splash, you'll be choosing between a high-end OLED TV and Micro LED – a self-emissive panel technology that Samsung has leant into in recent times, but which has proved difficult to offer either affordably or at mainstream sizing (76-inch is the smallest we've seen so far, as of 2021).

It's a more complicated picture than simply OLED, then, though for deep blacks and true-to-life color – at a size you can actually get into the average living room – OLED may still be the best choice.

How we test OLED TVs

The best OLED TVs are chosen by our writers and editors based on a few main criteria: their overall picture performance including contrast, color saturation and motion handling, as well as their feature set, design and smart TV platform. We're looking for TVs that are well-built and have the technology to last for the next few years. 

Obviously, there is a level of subjectivity that goes into the review process, however we strive to maintain fairness across brands by testing the same type of content on each screen (HD/SDR, 4K/HDR, games, movies and music) and reporting on our experience.

Like our readers, our writer's and editor's room layouts differ and may cause slight disparities in testing, however we make every attempt to question our assumptions and troubleshoot our issues with performance in every review.

Matt Bolton
Managing Editor, Entertainment

Matt is TechRadar's Managing Editor for Entertainment, meaning he's in charge of persuading our team of writers and reviews to watch the latest TVs and movies on gorgeous TVs and listen to fantastic speakers and headphones. It's a tough task, as you can imagine. Matt has over a decade of experience in tech publishing, and previously ran the TV & audio coverage for our colleagues at T3.com, and before that he edited T3 magazine. During his career, he's also contributed to places as varied as Creative Bloq, PC Gamer, PetsRadar, MacLife, and Edge. TV and movie nerdism is his speciality, and he goes to the cinema three times a week. He's always happy to explain the virtues of Dolby Vision over a drink, but he might need to use props, like he's explaining the offside rule.

With contributions from