Skip to main content

The best 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray players you can buy right now

PRICE
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
Three top 4k blu-ray players on a green background
(Image credit: Future)

The best 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray players are made to deliver the best picture quality you can get from movies and TV. Blu-ray discs are still the best way of watching for hardcore movie lovers, not just because of the quality, but also because streaming doesn't give you beautiful box art or the additional extras that come on the disc such as behind-the-scenes footage, Q&As with the cast and all kinds of other treasures.

The most important thing about 4K Blu-Rays is the quality, although being able to own your own movie collection is important too. Blu-Rays deliver video at a much higher bitrate than streaming services, delivering much more detail and realism. And your Blu-Rays can't vanish from your shelves in the same way movies can be pulled from streaming services or digital download services.

Because streaming is mass market now, the number of new Blu-Ray players released every year is relatively small. But the ones that are released are extremely good and usually very future-proof too, so you can often pick up a brilliant player for less cash if you're willing to consider a slightly older model – and once you've got them playing through one of the best TVs you'll never want to go back to streaming movies again.

And Blu-Ray players don't just provide pictures worthy of your stunning 4K TV. They also deliver huge sound to make the most of the best soundbars or best home theater systems.

In this guide we’ve rounded up the best Blu-ray players available to buy right now. That includes breakdowns of their price, features and compatibility to help you find the right model for your home. We’ve also included the latest Xbox and PlayStation hardware, too, because they look set to continue supporting 4K Blu-ray technology for years to come.

Editor's note: June 2022

There world of 4K Blu-ray players hasn't seen a lot of change in recent times. For those who want unbeatable features and picture quality for a realistic price, the Panasonic DP-UB9000 remains our top pick, while the option that best balances price with high-end picture is the Panasonic DP-UB820. The Sony UBP-X700 lacks a couple of features we'd like to see, but is the best cheaper buy. If you're wondering if one of the next-gen consoles is a good player, then the answer is yes – and it's the PS5.

Best 4K Blu-ray players: the list

Panasonic DP-UB9000 Blu-ray player on white background

(Image credit: Panasonic)
The best 4K Blu-ray player overall

Specifications

Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160
Smart TV: Yes
Dimensions: 430 x 81 x 300 mm
Weight: 7.8 kg
UHD Upscaling?: Yes
Wi-Fi?: Yes
3D support?: Yes
HDR Formats supported: HDR10, HDR10+, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Fantastic image quality
+
Four types of HDR support
+
Powerful HDR display optimizer

Reasons to avoid

-
No SACD or DVD-audio support
-
Not cheap

The DP-UB9000 is Panasonic’s flagship 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray player, and it's the model to get if you've gone for an elite TV and need something that can really push it to the max. It's beautifully made, enviably specified and unashamedly premium. The heavy metal build and luxe design mean it feels high-end too.

It's not just a pretty face. The DP-UB9000 is also the first UHD deck from Panasonic to support all key HDR flavours: vanilla HDR10, its dynamic sibling HDR10+, HLG and Dolby Vision.

When we tested the DP-UB9000 we were as impressed by its audio as by its image quality. It boasts high quality DACs, two-channel and 7.1-channel analogue outputs, and Hi-Res Audio support. Toss in a host of smart features, and the UB9000 ticks nearly every box in our book. 

Naturally all these flagship features don’t come cheap – but, for those seeking the best Blu-ray playback around and don't mind about it lacking some audio disc support, look no further. 

Read the full review: Panasonic DP-UB9000 review


Panasonic DP-UB820 on TV bench

(Image credit: Panasonic)

2. Panasonic DP-UB820

The best 4K Blu-ray player for most people

Specifications

Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160
Smart TV: Yes
Dimensions: 430 x 62 x 204 mm
Weight: 2.2 kg
UHD Upscaling?: Yes
Wi-Fi?: Yes
3D support?: Yes
HDR Formats supported: Dolby Vision, HDR10, HDR10+, HLG

Reasons to buy

+
Top picture quality for the price
+
Full HDR support

Reasons to avoid

-
No advanced audio disc support

The Panasonic DMP-UB820 is an ideal mid-range 4K Blu-ray player, delivering pretty much every video feature you could want – including full HDR support – but without costing as much as the UB9000 above. 

In our tests we found that this player may be more affordable, but it doesn't skimp on quality. Panasonic’s HCX image processing works with a special chroma processor that can smartly turn the 4:2:0 color of Blu-ray into 4:4:4 before it reaches your TV. This is obviously very nerdy stuff, but the end result is the best color reproduction you can find for movies, basically.

You've also got a bunch of streaming services built-in, in case you want to use this as your main movie-viewing platform.

What you're missing compared to the UB9000 above is the tank-like build and the support for some advanced music playback types – but a lot of people won't mind about that at all. We certainly don't – this is good enough to pair with high-end TVs, and it comes at a reasonable price.


Sony UBP-X700 on white background

(Image credit: Sony)

3. Sony UBP-X700

The best cheaper 4K Blu-ray player

Specifications

Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160
Smart TV: Yes
Dimensions: 320 x 45 x 217 mm
Weight: 1.4kg
UHD Upscaling?: Yes
Wi-Fi?: Yes
3D support?: Yes
HDR Formats supported: Dolby Vision, HDR10, HLG

Reasons to buy

+
Very strong picture quality
+
Dolby Vision support

Reasons to avoid

-
No HDR10+
-
Sound not as good as Panasonics

The Reavon XBR-X100 on a white background.

(Image credit: Reavon)
The X100 is good but there are better alternatives

Specifications

Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160
Smart TV: N/A
Dimensions: 430 x 85 x 300 mm
Weight: 6.3 kg
UHD Upscaling?: Yes
Wi-Fi?: No
3D support?: Yes
HDR Formats supported: HDR10, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent disc playback
+
Impressive 4K upscaling

Reasons to avoid

-
No SACD or DVD-Audio support
-
No wireless connectivity

For 4K Blu-ray players, the Reavon UBR-X100 is the new kid on the block, offering a stylish design and solid build quality to those who prefer their UHD decks to look like they mean business. The disc support is fairly extensive – although the X100 can’t handle SACD and DVD-Audio discs – and actual playback is smooth, responsive and trouble-free.

Whether its CD, DVD, or Blu-ray (Full HD, 3D and 4K variants) the Reavon is a highly capable digital transport. In our tests we found that native UHD content looked flawless, and lower resolution material was perfectly upscaled to match today’s 4K displays. There’s support for HDR10 and Dolby Vision, but not the less-popular HDR10+ format.

Overall, the X100 is a welcome addition to the disc player market that delivers a very good performance, but ultimately we think it struggles when compared to the similarly priced and better-specified Panasonic DP-UB9000.

Read the full review: Reavon UBR-X100

The Reavon UBR-X200 on a home entertainment center.

(Image credit: Reavon)

5. Reavon UBR-X200 4K Blu-ray Player

Like the X100, but with analogue outputs to keep audiophiles happy

Specifications

Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160
Smart TV: N/A
Dimensions: 430 x 85 x 300 mm
Weight: 6.3 kg
UHD Upscaling?: Yes
Wi-Fi?: No
3D support?: Yes
HDR Formats supported: HDR10, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Superb 4K upscaling
+
Extensive file support
+
Dolby Vision decoding
+
Audiophile outputs

Reasons to avoid

-
No DVD-Audio support
-
No HDR10+ decoding
-
No wireless connectivity
-
No built-in apps

The Reavon UBR-X200 is a desirable high-end 4K Blu-ray player that brings military-grade construction and a stylish finish to the luxury end of the market. The disc support is extensive but not quite universal, and while this player can handle CD, SACD, DVD, or Blu-ray (Full HD, 3D and 4K variants), it can’t play the lossless layer on a DVD-Audio disc.

However, in all other respects it’s a highly capable deck that ensures UHD content is delivered perfectly, and lower resolution material is upscaled to 4K with artefact-free processing and pixel precision. There’s support for HDR10 and Dolby Vision, although not the less popular HDR10+ format, but that minor point aside the video performance is flawless.

The X200 includes audiophile Burr-Brown DACs, combined with balanced XLR and 7.1-channel analogue audio outputs, ensuring an impressive sonic performance. The result is a player that’s sure to please music and movie fans alike. The media file support is extensive, even if the lack of Wi-Fi forces you to use a wired connection, but there are no built-in streaming apps.

The X200 is certainly impressive, but unless you’re in love with the looks, there are cheaper and better options.

Read the full review: Reavon UBR-X200

LG UBK90 4K Blu-player on white background

(Image credit: LG)

6. LG UBK90

Another cheap 4K Blu-ray player option

Specifications

Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160
Smart TV: Yes
Dimensions: 16.9 x 1.8 x 8.1 inches
Weight: 3.6 lbs
UHD Upscaling?: Yes
Wi-Fi?: Yes
3D support?: Yes
HDR Formats supported: Dolby Vision, HDR10

Reasons to buy

+
Dual HDMI outputs (one audio-only)
+
Dolby Vision support

Reasons to avoid

-
No HDR10+
-
No analog audio outputs

This $227 budget Blu-ray player from LG lacks many of the frills found on more expensive models such as universal disc support and analog audio outputs. What it does offer is solid, basic disc playback for Ultra HD and regular Blu-rays, DVDs, and audio CDs. 

Basically, the UBK90 does all the major things you'd expect from a 4K Blu-ray player, and is affordably priced.

A bonus the UBK90 offers is built-in streaming (over Wi-Fi or Ethernet) of Netflix and YouTube. So if your streaming menu is limited to those major players, you can use the UBK90 instead of a separate Roku, Fire TV, or Apple TV streaming box or stick.

Some reviewers have noted that LG’s budget player lacks some frills like HDR-to-SDR conversion (useful when viewing with a regular HDTV) and built-in HDR tone mapping, but for its low $227 price, it’s hard to complain too much about that.

Please note, we have not yet been able to review the LG UBK90 yet, and will update with our own testing experience when possible.

Consoles

PlayStation 5 on a white background.

(Image credit: Sony)

6. Sony PS5

The best console Blu-ray player (but only slightly

Specifications

Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160
Smart TV: Yes
Dimensions: 390 x 104 x 260 mm
Weight: 4.5kg
UHD upscaling?: Yes
Wi-Fi?: Yes
HDR Formats supported: HDR10

Reasons to buy

+
Atmos and DTS:X passthrough
+
Doubles as a games console

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision or HDR10+
-
No regular CD support

The Sony PS5 is helping to keep 4K Blu-ray technology alive with its dedicated disc drive – in the mainline console, at least. While you can buy a slightly cheaper discless version, it's the standard edition console we're interested in here. The PS5's disc drive can play 4K Blu-rays – which is fitting, since Sony helped to popularize Blu-ray players with the PS3 two whole console generations ago.

As an all-round media center, the PS5 isn't quite as advanced as the Xbox Series X – it doesn't natively support Dolby Atmos audio, nor does it support Dolby Vision HDR over streaming. However, both consoles can pass Dolby Atmos and DTS:X soundtracks through to your TV (with some minor tinkering in the Settings), and neither console supports Dolby Vision HDR or HDR10+ from Blu-rays, so actually the PS5 isn't at any disadvantage for discs compared to the Xbox.

Where it does have an advantage, though, is picture quality. In our tests we found that the PS5's image is cleaner and shaper for native 4K than the Xbox, and it upscales HD Blu-rays with more natural results. So we think of the two consoles the Sony is the better Blu-Ray player. Just make sure you buy the version that actually plays discs!

Read the full review: PS5 review

Find one now: Where to buy PS5

Xbox Series X on a white background.

(Image credit: Xbox)

7. Xbox Series X

Should be great for Blu-rays, but with some issues

Specifications

Supported resolution: 3840 x 2160
Smart TV apps: Yes
Dimensions: 301 x 151 x 151 mm
Weight: 4.45kg
Native 4K?: Yes
3D support?: No
HDR Formats supported: HDR10 for Blu-ray
Dolby Atmos: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Atmos and DTS:X passthrough
+
Doubles as a game console

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision from Blu-rays
-
No HDR10+

If you're sussing out a gaming console to play your 4K Blu-rays and DVDs, it's worth keeping in mind the Xbox Series X.

The Xbox Series X also supports Dolby Atmos audio and Dolby Vision HDR – neither of which you'll find on the PS5 – though the Dolby Vision support is limited to streaming services and doesn't extend to the disc drive, hence why the console is so low in this list. (You'll only get regular HDR10 over disc.)

It supports Dolby Atmos audio (including out to headphones, for a fee), but probably more usefully it passes Atmos or DTS:X soundtracks through to your TV to handle, when set up properly. We did find that it could be picky about passing DTS:X through a TV that doesn't support it to a sound system that does, though.

In our tests we also found that the 4K image quality and HD upscaling were both a little weaker from the Xbox Series X than the PS5. Microsoft has added Dolby Vision since we tested the console but it doesn't support Blu-Ray: it's purely for streaming and gaming. So we'd pick the PS5 if you're serious about playing UHD discs.

Read the full review: Xbox Series X

Find one now: Where to buy Xbox Series X

The best 4K Blu-ray players: FAQ

Are Blu-Rays still worth buying?

For our money, yes, but the question of just how long Blu-ray players and discs will stay relevant amid widespread industry changes is a difficult one to answer. 

For instance, tech giants like Oppo and Samsung have exited from the Blu-ray market altogether in recent times, leaving the likes of Sony, Pioneer and Panasonic as the only remaining major manufacturers of the hardware.

But on the flip side, the pedestrian arrival (and adoption) of 8K TVs means we don’t anticipate 8K Blu-ray players will ride in to replace their 4K equivalents any time soon. 

What’s more, some of the best movies ever made are only just getting 4K Blu-rays, and with the best 4K movies continuing to take advantage of Ultra HD Blu-ray technology – despite those high-profile departures from the industry – 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray players and discs are still worth considering if you’re after the very best home entertainment experience. 

What TV do I need to use a 4K UHD Blu-ray player?

It may seem obvious, but it’s worth clarifying that you’ll need to own a 4K TV to warrant buying a 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray player. A 4K player will still work if you’re using a HD display, mind, but picture quality will be limited to 1080p. 

That said, HD Blu-ray discs will be upscaled to 3840 × 2160 (4K) resolution by way of filling in the extra pixels, but the quality will appear noticeably lower-grade than Ultra HD Blu-ray discs (which provides a native 4K image).

Today's best 4K Blu-ray player deals

Matt Bolton
Matt Bolton

Matt is TechRadar's Senior Editor for TV and Audio, meaning he's in charge of persuading our team of reviewers to watch gorgeous TVs and listen to fantastic speakers and headphones. It's a tough task, as you can imagine. Matt has over a decade of experience in tech publishing, and previously ran the TV & audio coverage for our colleagues at T3.com, and before that he edited T3 magazine. During his career, he's also contributed to places as varied as Creative Bloq, PC Gamer, PetsRadar, MacLife, and Edge. TV and movie nerdism is his speciality, and he goes to the cinema three times a week. He's always happy to explain the virtues of Dolby Vision over a drink, but he might need to use props, like he's explaining the offside rule.

With contributions from