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Best 75-inch 4K TVs in 2022

Best 75-inch TV buying guide
(Image credit: Hisense / TCL / LG)

When it comes to getting a cinematic experience, the best 75-inch TVs can deliver something significantly closer to what you'd see at the cinema when stacked up against smaller models.

Having a TV of this size really has its advantages. Not only are details more noticeable thanks to the super-sized image, but you'll typically see brighter images with better contrast and richer colors, too.

In the past it's been prohibitively expensive to buy a 75-inch TV, because it was mostly only the very best TVs that came in these sizes. But that's not always the case these days – in fact, it's fairly easy to spot a good 75-inch TV deal every week that sees some behemoth television screen cut down in price to around what the best 65-inch TVs or best 55-inch TVs would cost.

The list below tries to address a number of pricing points – from some incredibly affordable options to some ultra-premium home theater monsters – but keep in mind that more TVs will be added to this list as 2022 marches on and new models hit store shelves.

That said, here's our guide to the best 75-inch 4K TVs you can buy in 2022 – including the best 8K TVs, because this is a size where that extra resolution really makes a difference. You'll also find many of the best OLED TVs here, though at 77 inches instead of specifically 75 inches, because that's just how OLEDs come.

Best 75-inch TVs: the list

Our picks of the top 75-inch models

the lg c2 oled tv

(Image credit: LG)
The best 77-inch OLED TV for most people

Specifications

Screen size: 77 inches
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Beautiful 4K/HDR picture
+
Four HDMI 2.1 ports
+
WebOS is fantastic

Reasons to avoid

-
Lack of cable management
-
No HDR10+ support

Although 75-inch TVs do look better with an 8K resolution, the LG C2 OLED does a tremendous job of filling up the screen space with its 4K resolution. Because it's an OLED TV, you're getting fantastic black levels and color saturation and all for a price that won't break the bank.

Improvements for 2022 include the new Alpha a9 Gen 5 processor, which is designed to offer better object enhancement and dynamic tone mapping than its predecessor. As well as that, you’re getting ‘virtual surround sound’, with the TV upscaling stereo content into 7.1.2-channel sound. While we weren’t convinced by the claims of virtual surround sound, the audio performance is good for a flatscreen TV, and a number of different sound modes means you should be able to find an audio profile that suits your needs. 

In addition to those improvements, the C2 OLED carries forward the four separate HDMI 2.1 ports that it inherited from the C1 OLED, meaning it's the perfect companion for the PS5Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S

The LG C2 isn’t flawless, however. Off-axis color saturation does diminish a bit when you move to the left or right of the screen when compared to the new QD-OLED models and LG doesn't support either the IMAX Enhanced or HDR10+ format.

There are, of course, higher resolution flatscreen TVs out there right now like the Samsung QN900B, which offers 8K resolution, and the new upgraded LG G2 OLED that has a slightly higher peak brightness, but for the price, this is the absolute best TV you're able to buy in 2022.

Read the full review: LG C2

Sony 55-inch XR-55X90J 4K TV

(Image credit: Sony Electronics)
The best 75-inch TV for most people

Specifications

Screen size: 75 inches
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: LED-LCD
Smart TV: Google TV
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Best in class image quality
+
Superb upscaling
+
Impressive processor

Reasons to avoid

-
Mediocre off-axis viewing
-
Slightly prone to glare

In our Sony X90J review we said that it's "nearly everything we’d want from a mid-range 4K LED-LCD TV. For the money, there are few TVs that can match it in terms of picture quality and feature set, making it top of its class for mid-range models." It's a 120Hz TV with two full-spec HDMI 2.1 ports, VRR and auto low latency mode for gaming and a full array panel with excellent local dimming for better black levels. There is a slightly better model that's less prone to glare and has slightly better brightness and contrast called the X95J, but that's likely to be significantly more expensive.

Sony's Cognitive Processor XR delivers excellent images, and while it's not as bright as a QLED display it still delivers punchy visuals – although it can struggle in very bright lighting, so you're not going to want to put it where light from a window can cause glare. The viewing angles aren't hugely wide but from front-on the image quality is sublime straight out of the box and easy to adjust. The sound is surprisingly good for a mid-range TV, and there's Dolby Atmos passthrough on the HDMI 3 eARC port so it's very soundbar/AV receiver-friendly,

If you're looking for an exceptional 4K HDR TV with Dolby Vision and excellent upscaling, this Sony is a superb buy. You can get better image quality from other options, naturally, but this is an especially good-value 75-inch option.

Read our full review: Sony X90J

75-inch Hisense U6G ULED 4K TV in living room, showing Hisense interface

(Image credit: John Brandon)
The best cheap 75-inch TV for US buyers

Specifications

Screen size: 75-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel technology: LCD-LED
Smart TV: Android TV
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision, HDR10+

Reasons to buy

+
Bright and colorful
+
Budget price
+
Total HDR support

Reasons to avoid

-
Overstuffed remote
-
Bland design

The 75-inch Hisense U6G ULED TV is among the most affordable options for a big-screen 4K TV. That's cheaper than the company's previous efforts with the H8G Quantum Series.

There's even a bit less of a price gap between the U6G's 65-inch and 75-inch variants, with the latter's slightly lower price certainly being more palatable to those wanting to go big. And we'd say the larger option is well worth it, especially with the U6G's support for HDR10+, Dolby Vision and HLG formats. These options mean you're getting excellently sharp and colorful image quality for the price.

As for drawbacks, there aren't a ton, but we weren't fans of the remote that shipped with the U6G. It's a little bloated compared to the relatively simple, stripped back designs of Apple TV or Google Chromecast remotes, but it's by no means a deal breaker.

You'll also want to invest in a soundbar, as like most other Hisense TVs, the default speakers aren't the greatest.

Read the full review: Hisense U6G

Samsung AU9000 TV in modern living room

(Image credit: Samsung)
The best cheap 75-inch TV for UK buyers

Specifications

Screen size: 75-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel technology: LCD-LED
Smart TV: Tizen
HDR: HDR10, HLG, HDR10+

Reasons to buy

+
Detailed 4K images
+
Rich, accurate colors
+
Good smart TV and gaming features

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the brightest screen
-
Sound is pretty thin

The Samsung AU9000 is the highest-end TV from the company's 2021 range that doesn't include its more expensive QLED technology. You still get a dual-LED backlight that provides impressively even and deep contrast, plus excellent image quality that really made the most of 4K detail in our testing: at this size, you need everything to look sharp, and this delivers.

Samsung's Tizen smart TV platform is packed with streaming services, and is overall easy to navigate. You get good gaming features here too, including a very low input lag and FreeSync VRR support.

The sound quality is merely okay – but most 75-inch TVs really need a soundbar to provide audio as big as their images anyway. It's also not the brightest set, due to using an edge-lit LED panel. This limits its HDR performance when it comes to dazzling dynamic range, though its colors are still inviting and real.

For its price, it's hard to fault it for these issues – when it comes to bang for your buck, it's up there with the best.

Read the full review: Samsung AU9000

Samsung QN900B Neo QLED 8K TV on TV bench in modern home

(Image credit: Samsung)
A stunning 8K TV that sets a new benchmark when it comes to high-end televisions

Specifications

Screen size: 65-inch, 75-inch, 85-inch
Resolution: 8K
Panel Type: Neo QLED / Mini LED
Smart TV: Tizen
HDR: HDR10, HLG, HDR10+

Reasons to buy

+
Increased backlighting accuracy
+
Excellent colors
+
Built-in Dolby Atmos

Reasons to avoid

-
Lacks Dolby Vision support
-
New 'Smart Hub' UI a step backwards
-
Limited 8K content

8K might feel a bit like overkill to some, but there's no doubt in our mind that the Samsung QN900B Neo QLED 8K TV is on another level of performance. Samsung's Mini LED-sporting QN900B Neo QLED 8K TV offers stunning picture quality, exceptional color and brightness, terrific sound and outstanding blacks – all in a package that's unmatched in terms of design.

For the uninitiated, Samsung's 'Quantum' Mini LEDs are 1/40th the thickness of a regular LED, meaning thousands of smaller LEDs can be packed together in a much tighter fashion, allowing for far more accurate dimming zones and black levels that are practically indistinguishable from an OLED.

As the LEDs are far smaller, they're able to achieve far more precision and less blooming, so the act of seeing bright areas of the screen unnaturally bleed over into darker spots should be greatly reduced or not evident at all. And because it takes advantage of Samsung's Multi-Intelligence AI upscaling, the QN900A is consistently able to produce images that looked better than their source. 

So why did we dock it half a point? Samsung's 2022 TV range sees the introduction of its new Smart Hub UI across its top models. It's a totally revamped interface that's anchored by a Google TV-inspired home screen populated by content recommendations from your various streaming subscriptions and apps.

Unfortunately, the change to a full-screen, content-packed home menu brings about some frustration. No longer can you easily adjust settings and change viewing modes on the fly – you now have to completely leave what you're watching or playing when bringing up said home screen, navigate to a sidebar menu, and then scroll down to a separate settings menu to perform actions that were just a few button presses away before.

It's a minor issue, sure, but we just couldn't give it full marks until a fix arrives.

Read the full Samsung QN900B Neo QLED 8K TV review

Sony XR-77A80K

(Image credit: Sony)
Top-tier performance with a mid-range price tag

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: OLED
Smart TV: Google TV
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Deep blacks and impressive brightness
+
Accurate out of box color (Cinema mode)
+
Strong suite of HDMI 2.1 gaming features

Reasons to avoid

-
Brightness a notch below the top OLED TVs
-
Overly simple remote lacks backlighting
-
No HDR10+ support

The Sony A80K offers all the best things you expect from an OLED TV such as deep blacks, superb HDR and well-saturated color, plus features like 4K 120Hz support for gaming and Sony’s Acoustic Surface Audio+ tech. It's a compelling, high-performance, though not bank-breaking, OLED TV option. Unlike its main rival LG, Sony prefers to power its OLED TVs with Google TV and Google Assistant via a cleverly hidden mic in the TV remote. 

As ever there's an alphabet soup of technologies here: XR OLED Contrast Pro, XR Triluminos Pro, and Cognitive Processor XR. In plain English they deliver superb upsampling, excellent motion processing and impressive picture quality, although the panel isn't as bright as the latest and greatest LG OLEDs. However this Sony punches above its price tag and has some clever innovations such as Sony's Acoustic Surface Audio+, which turns the screen into a speaker. It delivers very impressive Dolby Atmos positional audio without requiring a subwoofer.

This is a good option for gamers too. There are twin HDMI 2.1 inputs that support 4K 120Hz video, variable refresh rate (VRR), and auto low latency mode (ALLM), and there's Auto HDR Tone Mapping for PS5 gaming. In the US there's also a built in ATSC 3.0 tuner, so it's ready for next-gen digital TV broadcasts.

Read more: our full Sony A80K review

The LG G2 Gallery Series TV hanging on the wall.

(Image credit: LG)
The best 77-inch OLED TV

Specifications

Screen size: 77 inches
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: OLED
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Gorgeously bright, vibrant pictures
+
Beautiful premium design

Reasons to avoid

-
Optional stand costs extra
-
No HDR10+ support

If price isn't a concern for you and you simply want the best TV you can buy at any price point – well, then you want the LG G2 OLED. The OLED77G2 uses its extra brightness to make pretty much every frame of any source you care to mention look even more sublime than it has on any LG OLED before.

Although the G2 OLED shares the same ‘Gallery’ design name as its GX and G1 predecessors, it actually looks completely different: gone is the dark frame and chamfered edges, in is a nifty two-layer effect where a thin black rear ‘slab’ sits proud of and slightly narrower than a chunkier front tier housing the screen that’s encased in a very fetching and opulent-looking silver metal coat. 

The quality of the G2 OLED’s connections is beyond reproach. In particular, all four of its HDMI ports are capable of handling the maximum 48Gbps of data supported by the HDMI 2.1 standard. This means that hardcore video gamers could simultaneously attach an Xbox Series XPS5 and cutting-edge PC graphics rig to enjoy full-fat 4K at 120Hz, variable refresh rates and automatic low latency mode switching from all of them. That, plus you'll still have one HDMI left for adding a 4K Blu-ray player or streaming box.

To anyone familiar with LG’s OLED TVs over the years, the impact made by the extra brightness the heat sink unlocks is instantly obvious: the extra brightness gives colors more volume and punch, regardless of whether you’re talking about a very vibrant, rich tone, or a subtle, mild one. 

The end result is an OLED TV so supreme that it just barely misses the mark of our number one spot – only because its price puts it a bit far out of reach for the average TV watcher. Cinephiles, however, should certainly invest.

Read the full LG G2 OLED TV review

The Philips OLED 806

(Image credit: Philips)
A super-sized TV that shows its true colors at 75 inches

Specifications

Screen size: 75-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Panel technology: OLED
Smart TV: Android TV
Dimensions: 1680 x 966 x 70mm (W x H x D)

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent picture quality
+
Extensive specification

Reasons to avoid

-
Difficult setup process
-
Not the slimmest OLED

With the OLED806, Philips has delivered a good-looking, well-made OLED TV with an absolute stack of functionality, a unique selling point and periodically splendid picture quality. And it’s done all this for a real-world price.

Including every HDR standard isn’t unique - Panasonic does it too - but it certainly makes every other rival look a bit petty. A couple of HDMI inputs with full 2.1 specification is no more than next-gen gamers deserve. And the excellent picture quality - balanced and naturalistic, yet vibrant and exciting at the same time - is augmented by four-sided Ambilight for extra immersion and reduced eye-strain. 

What with this being an OLED panel, we’re entitled to expect clean, deep and lustrous black tones - and, sure enough, that’s what we’re given. But they’re revealing and consistent too, with a deeply impressive amount of detail and variation with them. And they’re complemeted at the other end of the spectrum by clear and equally detailed white tones - the Philips doesn’t use one of the most recent super-bright OLED panels enjoyed by pricier 2021 models from LG and Sony, but it’s capable of punchy and convincing contrasts nevertheless.

Read more: Philips OLED806 review

75-inch TCL 6-Series 4K TV on wooden shelf, with kitchen in background

(Image credit: TCL)
The 75-inch version of the 6-Series offers great value

Specifications

Screen size: 75-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Panel technology: LCD
Smart TV: Roku TV
Dimensions: 66.1 x 40.7 x 15.9 inches (W x H x D)

Reasons to buy

+
Roku TV is great
+
Bright, colorful HDR

Reasons to avoid

-
Loss of darker details
-
Limited motion settings

While TCL's awesome (and inexpensive) 6-Series has been around for a while, it wasn't until 2019 that a 75-inch model came to stores – and even as the price stays the small, the screen definitely goes big. 

This TCL TV offers Dolby Vision support, and comes with Roku TV as its smart platform – though this size model is available exclusively to Best Buy in the US.

While TCL's 6-Series didn't impress us quite as much as the other TVs on this list, it is a competitive screen at its price point, offering bright, colorful HDR and exceptionally clear images.

If you have deep pockets and a chequebook ready to go, we’d still tell you to reach deep and shell out for something higher on this list. But if the TCL 6 Series is what's in your budget, it will provide exceptional performance for the price.

Read the full review: TCL 6-Series

LG Nano90 75-inch 4K TV in gray living room

(Image credit: LG)
A super-size LCD screen to take on OLED (almost)

Specifications

Screen size: 75-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Panel technology: LCD
Smart TV: webOS
Dimensions: 1677 x 966 x 72.9mm (W x H x D)

Reasons to buy

+
Wide viewing angles
+
Good black levels (for an LCD)

Reasons to avoid

-
No HDR10+
-
Backlight issues

The best LG TVs usually feature OLED panels, but the Nano90 is an exception as the flagship 4K LCD from LG last year – offering premium features, excellent processing, and a massive size for a significantly lower price than the 77-inch OLED TVs out there.

LCD is still the cheaper way to go, and you are having to put up with some issues you won't see on OLED: the Nano90 suffers some mild backlight flickering, for one, though the black levels are still very impressive for an LCD set.

The Nano90's wide viewing angles, strong color performance, and reliable webOS smart platform all make it a 75-inch screen that's easy to recommend – that is, if you can't stump up the cash for a (let's admit it, superior) OLED model like the CX above.

Read more: LG Nano90 TV review

Buying the best 75-inch 4K TV for you

Is a 75-inch TV too big for a living room?

While many promotional and marketing images might lead you to believe that a 75-inch TV is too big for a living room, this really isn't the case for lounges of an average size.

So long as you have a table or stand that's accommodating to the TV's large size, and create adequate space for peripherals like soundbars and speakers, a 75-inch TV won't take up as much real estate as you might think. 

Do keep in mind that you may have to rearrange the room around the TV for the best possible viewing experience, however.

How far should you sit from a 75-inch TV?

For optimal viewing with a 75-inch TV, we'd recommend sitting roughly 50-60 inches away from the screen for a fully immersive experience. Rearranging the furniture in your room to accommodate this will help, and it could be as simple as slightly adjusting your couch.

How much does a 75-inch TV cost?

The very best 75-inch TVs (opens in new tab) can vary wildly in price. The LG G1, for example, will run you an eye-watering $4,499 / £4,799 (around AU$6,000), while Hisense present a much more affordable option in the U6G at $1,199 (around £790 / AU$1,470).

The difference in price here seems drastic considering both examples offer excellent picture quality. It all depends on how much you're willing to pay for extra bells and whistles and design sensibilities, such as the G1's wonderfully thin design and best-in-class options for gaming.

Do be extra wary about TV sales that sound too good to be true, though. If you see a 75-inch 4K TV for around $600 / £600, it's probably going to let you down in terms of picture performance with bad backlighting and cheap edge-lit LED panels that produce poor black levels and contrast.

During key sales periods such as Black Friday, of course, those pricing expectations are a little different, so in any case it's worth paying attention to how much a 75-inch TV was at launch. 

Some Hisense TVs can have a high launch price and quickly undercut it for a sense of value, and often you can get a good discount at least a few months after release, but in general you should be looking for the largest discount compared to a previous price, rather than just the cheapest 75-inch TV out there. And if you're low on cash, you should probably be opting for a decent 65-inch TV, rather than a half-baked 75-inch one.

Once you get to a 75-inch size, too, 8K TVs really become a smart investment too. That's because the greater number of pixels over 4K (33 million rather than eight million) ensures far greater detail at that size. A 55-inch 8K TV doesn't really make much of a difference, but a 75-inch 8K TV certainly does.

Jamie Carter contributed original reporting to this article.

Nick Pino
Nick Pino

Nick Pino is Managing Editor, TV and AV for TechRadar's sister site, Tom's Guide. Previously, he was the Senior Editor of Home Entertainment at TechRadar, covering TVs, headphones, speakers, video games, VR and streaming devices. He's also written for GamesRadar+, Official Xbox Magazine, PC Gamer and other outlets over the last decade, and he has a degree in computer science he's not using if anyone wants it.

With contributions from