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The best 40, 42 and 43-inch TVs 2022, for all budgets

the best 40-inch TV resting on white media unit
(Image credit: Toshiba)
Editor's note: August 2022

We're still waiting for a lot of 2022's new smaller and more budget TVs to arrive, but we've refreshed this list to include the hottest 42-inch TV of the year at the top: the LG C2. 

It's the first OLED 4K TV to arrive at this size, and it brings all the features of its bigger siblings that earned the TV a five-star rating – unlike the also-high-end Samsung QN90A.

With costs continuing to squeeze people, we've also emphasized the cheaper options more in the latest version of list, so that you can find a great buy whatever your budget.

Matt Bolton, Senior Editor, TV & Audio

Are you looking for the best 40-inch TVs? We've got them all neatly rounded up right here. If you have a tight budget or simply don't have the space for an enormous 65-inch TV then you may want to consider a 40-inch screen instead. They might not sound as impressive as something bigger but you should not underestimate them. 

You’ll still be dazzled by features such as 4K resolution and HDR compatibility to give you impressive picture quality, along with smart TV integration will ensure you can access a wide range of content options to enjoy. You’ll also be able to hook up all your game consoles, Blu-ray players, and streaming boxes to get even more out of the 40-inch TV.

All of that will not only come at a more budget-friendly price compared with larger screens, but you also won’t have to worry about the display dominating your living room space. 40-inch TVs are the perfect size for secondary TVs in bedrooms or the kitchen where getting the best home cinema experience might not be your primary concern.

The downside? You can't enjoy some of the more stand-out features right now. For instance, there are no 40-inch TVs that use OLED and most brands' flagship models with the latest technology don't come in a size this small. 

We’ve rounded up the best 40-inch TVs that we’ve reviewed on our site – including 42-inch and 43-inch models. You’ll also find some additional tips about what to look for and how important picking the right TV size really is.

Best 40, 42 and 43-inch TVs: the list

Our top picks

The all-new 42-inch LG C2 OLED

(Image credit: LG)
The best 42-inch TV thanks to OLED tech

Specifications

Screen Size: 42-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
 Stunning OLED contrast and colors
+
Totally future-proofed features

Reasons to avoid

-
Not as bright as some
-
Sound isn't as good as pictures 

The LG C2 is the first OLED 4K TV to come in a 42-inch size, finally bringing this premium screen technology to compact TVs. If you're a hardcore movie lover looking for the most cinematic images possible from this size of TV, this is it. The search is over, stop now.

Because each individual pixel generates its own light, you get perfect precision in scenes that contrast light and dark, with true black right next to bright lights. You also get very impressive nuance in dark scenes, bringing out more detail in these moment than LED TVs can manage.

And it's also packed with all of LG's latest and greatest image tech. You get its highest-end image processing, so everything looks totally sharp and natural on the 4K screen, and it also supports HDMI 2.1 on all of its HDMI ports, so there's 4K 120Hz and VRR support for next-gen gaming – this is 100% future-proofed. It's the best small TV for gaming right now, no question.

The sound system isn't as rich as the visuals, so we'd suggest adding a small soundbar, and it's not as bright as the Samsung 43-inch QN90A mini-LED TV… but it's still brighter than the vast majority of the competition. It's expensive, but if you want truly the most advanced 42-inch TV going, this is it. In addition to our overall LG C2 review (below), we've also specifically tested the LG C2 42-inch model for comparison.

Read the full review: LG C2

40-inch Vizio TV placed opposite Eames chair

(Image credit: Vizio)
The best cheap 43-inch TV for the US

Specifications

Screen size: 43-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: LCD
Smart TV: SmartCast
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Decent upscaling
+
Affordable
+
Dolby Vision HDR support

Reasons to avoid

-
Poor contrast
-
Desaturated images
-
Weak off-axis viewing

The V- in the Vizio V-Series TVs has always stood for ‘value’, but you could easily argue that it should stand for ‘versatile’ instead, as this is one of the most feature-rich TVs in the budget category. With support for HDR (HDR10, HDR10+, Dolby Vision and HLG) plus Chromecast and AirPlay built-in, the V-Series is a veritable swiss army knife of budget TVs.

Unfortunately, despite all these technologies the V-Series is still a pretty budget-oriented set. We'd describe the picture quality as "fair" because its contrast isn’t off-the-charts and its color saturation could use some work too. Its biggest issue is that of awful off-axis viewing (more than 45 degrees) that quickly turns what is a fine and acceptable picture to a really desaturated mess. 

If you can stay perfectly in front of it, don’t mind less-than-stellar image quality and can deal with a few issues in speed and performance, however, it’s an affordable TV series that packs in a lot of the technology that makes the top TVs from LG and Samsung the best in the world.

Read the full review: Vizio V-Series (2020)

Samsung BU8500

(Image credit: Samsung)
The best cheap 43-inch TV for UK buyers

Specifications

Screen Size: 43", 50", 55", 65", 75"(Europe only)
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: LCD
Smart TV: Tizen
Dimensions: 966 x 560 x 25.7mm

Reasons to buy

+
Accomplished 4K picture performance
+
Very acceptable specification at the price
+
Slim and (relatively speaking) quite elegant

Reasons to avoid

-
Has its limits when upscaling
-
Sound is quite hard and thin
-
No Dolby Vision HDR 

With the BU8500 Samsung has set out to deliver a superb all-rounder for a very affordable price, and we think it's achieved exactly that. For a relatively small price you're getting 4K HDR (albeit without Dolby Vision), three HDMIs, voice control, two remote controls and all the apps you might want. It's not up there with the very best TVs that cost many times more, but it delivers much better picture quality than you'd expect at this price. The only real downside is that its speakers are very weedy, but at this price you can afford to add a decent soundbar.

The main corners that have been cut are in processing: the upscaling here isn't as good on lower-resolution sources as Samsung's higher-spec models, and while we didn't find input lag to be a problem the fact that Samsung hadn't published the figures suggests it's going to be a bit more laggy than the best gaming TVs. You’ll also lose out on some multi-HDR support, so while you will get HLG, HDR10, and HDR10+ dynamic metadata you’ll miss out on Dolby Vision (though this is true of all Samsung TVs). None of the issues are significant enough to be a deal-breaker at this price (and the TV still performs incredibly well) but you might notice a steep picture improvement on larger and more expensive models.

All things considered, though, we think this is a fantastic set for the price. It's superb value for money and one of the best Samsung TVs in terms of bang for buck.

Read our full Samsung BU8500 review 

Samsung QN90A Neo QLED TV in living room while man plays video games

(Image credit: Samsung)
The best 43-inch TV for astoundingly bright HDR

Specifications

Screen size: 43-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: Neo QLED
Smart TV: Tizen
HDR: HDR10, HLG, HDR10+

Reasons to buy

+
The brightest TV this size
+
Excellent sharpness and colors

Reasons to avoid

-
No 4K 120Hz or VRR
-
No Dolby Vision

This is the smallest TV with Samsung's high-end Neo QLED TV tech, which combines the colors and brightness that QLED is famous for with a next-gen mini-LED backlight, which means even more lights are squeezed into a thinner panel.

In our testing, its peak HDR brightness blasted well over 1,000 nits, and in some modes it can reach nearly 2,000 nits. Compared to the 700 nits of brightness from the LG C2, you can see this TV is the exception when it comes to punchy, dazzling HDR. And with the localized dimming of its tiny LED lights, its contrast between light and dark is better than the other LCD TVs here, by a huge margin – though the OLED TV still has the edge.

Samsung's excellent image processing means that you'll get super-sharp 4K images, and excellent upscaling. And like other Samsung TVs, it's great for gaming, with very low latency in its gaming mode… but there's a catch here. Most QN90A sizes feature 4K 120Hz and VRR support from next-gen consoles, but not at this size. For gamers, the LG C2 remains the champ. But if you want bright HDR that can be viewed even in a bright sunlit room, this is the pick.

Read the full review: Samsung QN90A

40-inch TCL TV hangs on wall above fireplace

(Image credit: TCL)

5. TCL 4-Series (US only)

A solid budget TV, propped up by Roku's smart platform

Specifications

Screen size: 43-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: LCD
Smart TV: Android TV
Dimensions: 72.1 x 124.5 x 7.87mm

Reasons to buy

+
Decent pictures
+
Roku TV built-in

Reasons to avoid

-
Can't match the 6-Series
-
Few cutting-edge features

The TCL 4-Series isn't as exciting as the company's 6-Series QLED with Mini LED, but it's surprisingly good value at around $200, and a solid choice in our best TCL TV guide.

The 4-Series is available in two different variations based on its smart platform – either Roku TV or Android TV – but we strongly recommend opting for the Roku model for its smoother performance, usability and security. 

Disappointingly, the 4-Series doesn't have all the latest specs (no HDMI 2.1, VRR, ALLM, etc...) but it does support HDR10 and HLG forms of HDR, has a built in 802.11ac wireless antenna and has one HDMI port with ARC, which is great for folks who want to cut down on the number of remotes in their house. 

It's not the best TCL TV on the planet, but if you're limited to a 40-inch TV and want to have hundreds of streaming channels at your fingertips, the TCL 4-Series Roku TV is a smart bet and a very good value.

Read more: TCL TV guide

40-inch Hisense TV on built-in cabinet

(Image credit: Hisense)

6. Hisense A7200 Roku TV (UK only)

A cheap 4K HDR TV, with some compromises

Specifications

Screen size: 43-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: LCD
Smart TV: Roku TV
Dimensions: 969 x 564 x 85 mm

Reasons to buy

+
Splendid Roku TV interface
+
Clean, discreet design

Reasons to avoid

-
Motion issues
-
Sounds flat-out poor

This low-price Hisense TV may be the best way to save some pennies on a new 43-inch TV, although you will have to settle for some compromises.

This is a great value television, and the Roku TV platform is always a joy to use thanks to its sleek interface, well-organised tile icons and broad app support. But as a 4K HDR TV it struggles a little bit with SD or HD; it's best connected to high-resolution sources. We weren't impressed by the audio, either: it's pretty clear where some corners have been cut to keep the price so low. 

If you want a cheap TV, though, and aren't put off by some scratchy audio or bungled upscaling, this could be a smart way to watch 4K content on a budget.

Read our full review: Hisense A7200G Roku TV

Best 40- to 43-inch TV FAQ

Is a 40-inch TV big enough?

It's worth remembering that 40-inch screens, while once the pinnacle of high-end TV tech, is now a pretty small size compared to what's out there.

These days, 55-inch 4K TVs are standard, with 65-inch 4K TVs quickly growing in popularity. Manufacturers can make bigger screens than ever before, and shoppers are cottoning on to how big TVs can actually get.

A 40-inch TV should come with 4K resolution, but you'll be able to see the benefits more clearly on a larger size. A 40-inch TV is a pretty decent size for a single viewer not sitting too far away, too, but for a family or group of flatmates it's less than ideal.

So don't sell yourself short: definitely do the work of measuring how big a TV you can fit into your intended space, and think over how big a TV you're willing to bring into your home. (To get the best of both worlds, with a small product that offers a massive picture, you might want to consider one of the best projectors too.)

What about 42-inch TVs?

For ease, we've included 40-inch TVs as well as the best 42-inch TVs in this guide. You'll occasionally even get screens listed as 43-inch TVs, but they all sit around roughly the same measurements.

Of course, many things affect the size and scale of a TV screen beyond simply the diagonal length of the panel, including the width of the bezel (the black strip around the screen's edges), built-in speakers, HDMI inputs and connections, as well as the depth of the casing (which often varies in different places).

We could well be seeing in a resurgence in 42-inch TVs, though, with panel-maker LG Display confirming that 42-inch OLEDs are in development. We're yet to hear about any specific timelines, models, or price points, but this compact panel size could result in the lowest OLED TV launch price we've ever seen – and the smart money says we could see these screens start to emerge as soon as 2022.

How to choose

40-inch TV hangs on wall as family watches on sofa

(Image credit: Vizio)

How do I pick out a 40-inch TV?

Not sure how to choose what 40-inch TV is for you? While the options might feel overwhelming, it's worth considering what we think about when recommending TVs here on TechRadar.

Ultra HD vs Full HD: It's a common misconception that you can't see the difference between full HD and Ultra HD/4K on a screen smaller than 55 inches. You can. We recommend picking a TV with 4K Ultra-HD and HDR if you can find one. It makes a big difference. 

Operating system: 40-inch TVs didn't always come with a smart TV operating system in the past but they often do now. What you're looking for, ideally, is a well-maintained operating system like Roku TV, LG's webOS or Samsung's Tizen operating system. If you go with a TV that uses a proprietary operating system (basically an operating system exclusive to that one TV) you might have some serious issues down the road.

Inputs and outputs: Multiple HDMI ports are important if you have many devices to hook up to your TV. Don't pick a TV with just one HDMI port. You'll find yourself swapping cables far too often. 

Matt Bolton
Matt Bolton

Matt is TechRadar's Senior Editor for TV and Audio, meaning he's in charge of persuading our team of reviewers to watch gorgeous TVs and listen to fantastic speakers and headphones. It's a tough task, as you can imagine. Matt has over a decade of experience in tech publishing, and previously ran the TV & audio coverage for our colleagues at T3.com, and before that he edited T3 magazine. During his career, he's also contributed to places as varied as Creative Bloq, PC Gamer, PetsRadar, MacLife, and Edge. TV and movie nerdism is his speciality, and he goes to the cinema three times a week. He's always happy to explain the virtues of Dolby Vision over a drink, but he might need to use props, like he's explaining the offside rule.

With contributions from