The best 120Hz 4K TVs 2024, ideal for PS5 and Xbox Series X

The best 120Hz 4K TVs are essential for both gamers and movie lovers. The 4K resolution they deliver brings you extra pixels for better clarity and combined with a 120Hz refresh rate, your games and movies look buttery smooth.

If you're a gamer, a 120Hz refresh rate means you’ll not only see things much more clearly in motion, but you'll see faster response times – the best 120Hz TVs dominate our list of the best gaming TVs for these reasons. This guide also has 144Hz TVs in, which can be useful for PC gaming. These TVs all also support 120Hz for consoles. Meanwhile, 24fps movies can play without the frustrating judder you may have noticed on some cheaper TVs, if you have a source that can deliver this, such as an Apple TV 4K (2022).

We test the best 120Hz TVs with the latest gaming consoles to make sure they work as intended, and we use specialist equipment to measure the input lag ourselves – it's not about what manufacturers claim, but about what you get in real life. We also check their image quality, naturally – everything still needs to look great!

The quick list

Want to cut to the chase and find out which 120Hz TVs are the best? Below, you’ll find a roundup of our choices. You can also jump to a more detailed write-up of every TV for more information, based on our in-depth reviews.

Written by
James Davidson
Written by
James Davidson

I'm TechRadar's TV specialist writer, and I've tested everything from budget 32-inch TVs up to the world’s most elite OLED TVs – and I've used that experience to craft this guide, along with input TechRadar's AV editors. Before joining TechRadar, I worked for several years at a leading AV retailer, dealing with everything from Bluetooth speakers to custom home theater installations.

Recent updates

10 May 2024
Swapped the Samsung S95C for the Samsung S95D as the 'Best premium OLED'. The S95C is still available, and great value after price drops, but the S95D's new Glare Free reflection-beating screen is really valuable for gaming in sunlit rooms, so we've replaced the old model immediately.

The best 120Hz TV for most people

Samsung S90C showing the Gaming Hub feature

(Image credit: Future)
The best 120Hz TV for most people

Specifications

Available sizes: 55, 65, and 77 (83-inch available with different panel)
Panel type: QD-OLED
Input lag: < 10ms
Refresh rate: 144Hz
VRR: Freesync Premium
ALLM: Yes
HDMI 2.1: 4

Reasons to buy

+
Detailed, bright picture 
+
Plenty of gaming features

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision 
-
Samsung S95D is brighter still
Buy it if:

✅ You want a well-featured gaming TV: The Samsung S90C has plenty of gaming features including 144Hz, VRR, ALLM, AMD FreeSync Premium and Samsung's Game Hub.

✅ You want a phenomenal picture: The S90C has stunning contrast and black levels and vivid color that gets the best out of both gaming and movies.

Don't buy it if:

You want the brightest QD-OLED picture: The Samsung S95D or LG G3 offer the brightest OLED picture if you want that extra dazzle for your games. 

❌You want Dolby Vision for your games: The Samsung S90C doesn't support Dolby Vision so Xbox Series X owners may want to take this into account.

The Samsung S90C is the best option for most people, with a picture that captures the contrast-rich images and deep blacks of an OLED, coupled with the stunning brightness of a QLED. This results in a picture that gives it an edge over the LG C2 (featured further down our list) and C3. 

For gamers, there is support for HDMI 2.1 across all four ports, VRR, ALLM and a host of other gaming features including a dedicated game bar and hub to really get the best out of your games – and support for both 4K 120Hz or 4K 144Hz from PC.

Although it lacks Dolby Vision for Xbox Series X gamers and movie viewing, the picture itself is dynamic and bright enough that you get an excellent level of HDR impact without it. 

The S90C may lack the even more ridiculous brightness of the S95D (also in this list) but we found its pictures to be supremely consistent and immersive. And with the S90C being so much cheaper than the S95D, you really are getting great value for money.

Getting the best of both OLED and QLED technology in one picture at a more budget friendly price than the S95D is a no-brainer, if your budget stretches to it. Even its built-in audio is good. Paired with all the great gaming features on offer, it's no surprise that the S90C is our pick for best 120Hz TV overall. But there's a caveat about the 83-inch model – this uses a totally different OLED panel. While it's still a 120Hz TV, it's nowhere near as bright as the other sizes.

Read our full Samsung S90C review

The best value 120Hz TV

Hisense U8K onscreen game menu

(Image credit: Future)
The best value 120Hz TV

Specifications

Available sizes: 55, 65, 75 and 85 inches
Panel type: Mini-LED
Input lag: 13ms
Refresh rate: 144Hz
VRR: Freesync Premium Pro
ALLM: Yes
HDMI 2.1: 2

Reasons to buy

+
Great brightness levels 
+
Affordable for a mini-LED TV

Reasons to avoid

-
Some backlight blooming 
-
Contrast fades off center
Buy it if:

✅ You want a brilliant value gaming TV: The Hisense U8K has a lot of gaming features such as 144hz and VRR in a budget-friendly mini-LED TV.

✅ You want a bright picture while gaming: Thanks to mini-LED tech, the U8K has high brightness that suits brighter rooms well.

Don't buy it if:

You want a cloud gaming hub: The U8K doesn't come with a built-in cloud gaming hub that you'll find on other brands such as Samsung.

❌You want multiple viewing angles: When viewed off-center, the Hisense U8K's contrast does fade so you won't be getting the best picture from all angles. 

The Hisense U8K has extensive gaming features combined with great picture quality with great brightness and deep black levels all in at an affordable price. Using mini-LED technology for high brightness levels, the Hisense U8K is great for daytime viewing.

In terms of gaming, the Hisense U8K is a surprisingly well-stocked TV. With two HDMI 2.1 ports that offer a refresh rate of up to 144Hz, Dolby Vision, VRR (in the form of FreeSync Premium Pro) and ALLM support, the Hisense U8K is an ideal option for gaming, especially for those with particularly bright environments. The only downside is that there's only two HDMI 2.1 ports, as opposed to the four you'll find on some of the other best gaming TVs.  

Despite focusing on brightness, thanks to that mini-LED technology, the Hisense U8K also offers deep black levels for an excellent contrast. Unfortunately, this contrast does fade somewhat when viewed off-center. However, thanks to its anti-glare coating and a high peak brightness of 1,590 nits (which tops any OLED TV available today) it makes light work of brighter viewing environments.

The U8K also provides good audio quality, with deep bass as a highlight and a useful design, thanks to its adjustable-width support feet. The Hisense U8K may not be the best gaming TV on the market, but it gives you a whole lot of bang for your buck.

Read our full Hisense U8K review

Best mid-range 120Hz for PS5

Sony X90L game menu shown onscreen

(Image credit: Future)
The best mid-range 120Hz TV for PS5

Specifications

Available sizes: 55, 65, 75, 85 and 98-inch
Panel type: LED
Input lag: 18.2ms
Refresh rate: 120Hz
VRR: FreeSync Premium Pro
ALLM: Yes
HDMI: 4 (2x HDMI 2.1)

Reasons to buy

+
High brightness for an LED TV 
+
Wide-ranging picture adjustments 

Reasons to avoid

-
Slight backlight blooming
-
Only two HDMI 2.1 ports
Buy it if:

✅ You are a PS5 owner: The Sony X90L has Sony's Auto HDR feature, which tailors HDR tone mapping when a PS5 is detected. 

✅ You want a great picture for your games: The X90L has superb 'infinite' contrast levels and improved brightness for a better overall picture. 

Don't buy it if:

You want the best gaming performance: The X90L has a high 18.2ms input lag, even in gaming mode, which is much higher than a lot of cheaper sets. 

❌You need multiple HDMI 2.1 ports: With only two HDMI 2.1 ports, those with multiple consoles and soundbars are going to need to look at alternative solutions. 

Thanks to its 'Perfect for PS5' technology, gaming features and above average LED brightness, the Sony X90L is a no brainer if you are looking for a mid-range, 120Hz TV to go with your PS5. 

The Sony X90L is a great option for gaming, with 120Hz, VRR and ALLM support and 'Perfect for PS5' features. 'Perfect for PS5' means that when a PS5 is connected, the X90L will use its auto HDR tone mapping feature to get the best picture out of your games on the PS5. Frustratingly, it has an average input lag time of 18.2ms, which is higher than all the other TVs on this list and only two 2.1 HDMI ports, but it still has very good gaming performance overall.

In terms of picture, the Sony X90L's most striking feature is its brighter-than-average LED picture. Its peak brightness measured at 1,225 nits in our testing, which is brighter than a lot of OLED and LED TVs, including the brilliant Samsung S90C. Thanks to this brightness, images on the Sony X90L are punchy and feature crisp details, that'll not only look great with games but also movies.

Sound quality and design are also solid on the Sony X90L, with clear dialogue and an attractive, slim design to the set itself. Yes, it may be more expensive than some OLED and mini-LED TVs on the market, but considering its high brightness and gaming features, the Sony X90L is an excellent gaming option.

Read our full Sony X90L review

The best 120Hz TV for sizes

The LG C4 OLED TV showing artwork in ambient mode

(Image credit: Future)
The best 120Hz TV for sizes

Specifications

Available sizes: 42, 48, 55, 65, 77 and 83-inches
Panel type: 4K OLED
Input lag: 9.2ms (Boost)
Refresh rate: 144Hz
VRR: HDMI forum, FreeSync, G-Sync
ALLM: Yes
HDMI 2.1: 4

Reasons to buy

+
Good OLED brightness 
+
Extensive gaming features
+
Dolby Vision Filmmaker Mode

Reasons to avoid

-
Average built-in audio performance
-
No HDR10+ support
Buy it if:

✅ You want a range of sizes: Available in sizes from 42- to 83-inch, the C4 works for all situations whether it's bedroom or living room gaming. 

✅ You want a lot of gaming support: Four HDMI 2.1 ports, Dolby Vision gaming, up to 144Hz refresh rate and a Game Optimizer are just some of the C4's gaming features. 

Don't buy it if:

You want the brightest OLED: While improved over last year's C3, the LG C4 isn't as bright as flagship OLEDs such as the Samsung S95D or some mini-LED TVs. 

❌You need powerful built-in audio: The LG C4's 2.2-channel sound system comprises isn't among the most immersive on the market. 

The LG C4 covers a lot of the bases. It's available in sizes from 42 to 83 inches, has excellent picture quality, a competitive mid-range OLED price and stacks of gaming features including up to 144Hz refresh rate for the first time in the LG C series. 

Whether it's 42-inch, 83-inch or any size in between, you'll still be getting four HDMI 2.1 ports with 144Hz refresh rate, VRR (including AMD FreeSync and Nvidia G-Sync), ALLM and Dolby Vision gaming built-in. You'll also get LG's Game Optimizer that sets the C4 to its optimum gaming settings, which can be adjusted further. 

But, it's not just gaming where the C4 excels but also movies. With improved brightness levels over its predecessor, the C3 (we measured the C4 at 1,025 nits peak brightness compared to the C3's 830 nits) has even better contrast and detail than before. It also does a great job of handling reflections - ideal for daytime movie viewing and gaming.

While it doesn't quite achieve top-of-the-list status due to its average built-in audio performance and will stretch your budget compared to LED and mini-LED models, for those looking for a gaming OLED that can fit the largest living room to the smallest bedroom, the C4 won't let you down. 

Read our full LG C4 OLED TV review

The best cheap 120Hz OLED TV

LG B3 with game menu and battlefield v on display

(Image credit: Future)
The best cheap 120Hz OLED

Specifications

Available sizes: 55. 65 and 77-inches
Panel type: OLED
Input lag: 9.2ms
Refresh rate : 120Hz
VRR: Yes
ALLM: Yes
HDMI 2.1: 4 (2 x HDMI 2.1)

Reasons to buy

+
Deep blacks and detailed shadows
+
Excellent gaming performance 

Reasons to avoid

-
Lacking sound system
-
Cheap feeling stand 
Buy it if:

✅ You want OLED gaming for cheaper: The LG B3 offers a lot of brilliant gaming features and OLED picture for a cheaper price than other OLED TVs. 

✅ You want great gaming performance: It's not the top performer, but the B3's picture and gaming performance combine to make a fantastic gaming option. 

Don't buy it if:

You want the full gaming experience: The LG B3 doesn't have four HDMI 2.1 ports like you'll find on TVs such as the LG C3 and Samsung S90C. 

❌You want the physically best TV: The LG B3's supplied stand feels a little on the cheap side, which is disappointing for what is still a pricy TV for a lot of people. 

As the entry-level model in LG's 2023 OLED TV lineup, the LG B3 comes packed with plenty of gaming features, a gorgeous picture that rivals more premium TVs and a great price (that continues to fall). It's the cheapest you can get a 2023 TV with120Hz support for gaming with an OLED panel.

The LG B3 has a fantastic suite of gaming features including 120Hz refresh rate, VRR, ALLM, Nvidia GSync and AMD FreeSync and a Game Optimizer mode to adjust the settings of your games and get the maximum out of them. Games also look brilliant on it, with a sharp, detailed picture that handles graphically intense moments smoothly and effectively. 

Not just a great TV for games, the B3 is perfect with movies. With deep black levels, stunning contrast and vivid colors, the B3 is the perfect companion to any movie marathon. It doesn't have the best brightness, clocking in around 649 nits of peak brightness, but viewed in a suitably dimmed environment, the B3 is an excellent TV.

The B3 also doesn't have the best audio quality and the supplied stand feels a little cheap, especially compared to its more premium counterpart the LG C3. But for the money the B3 is a great TV and will certainly making your gaming experience all the more enjoyable. 

Read our full LG B3 review 

The best premium 144Hz OLED TV

Samsung S95D with Battlefield V on screen

(Image credit: Future)
The best super-bright 144Hz OLED, with a new anti-glare screen

Specifications

Available sizes: 55, 65 and 77-inches
Panel type: QD-OLED
Input lag: 8.9ms
Refresh rate: 144Hz
VRR: Yes
ALLM: Yes
HDMI 2.1: 4

Reasons to buy

+
The brightest OLED, with Glare Free display
+
Excellent gaming support

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision support
-
Black crush in Filmmaker Mode
Buy it if:

✅ You want a premium OLED gaming experience: With stacks of gaming features and QD-OLED picture, the S95D provides a sensational gaming experience

✅ You want to play in bright rooms: Despite being less bright than mini-LED TVs, this is still easily visible in bright rooms thanks to an awesome, unique reflection-busting screen.

Don't buy it if:

You want the best value gaming TV: Stacked with features, the S95D does carry a higher price than other well-equipped gaming TVs. 

❌ You want Dolby Vision for your games: As with all Samsung TVs, the S95D sadly doesn't support Dolby Vision. 

Bringing a bold, detailed and crisp QD-OLED picture with a plethora of gaming features, the Samsung S95D delivers the dynamic, premium experience that gamers are looking for. And with new anti-reflection finish on the screen, OLED gaming can finally be enjoyed in the brightest of rooms without you cursing that you couldn't see that enemy behind your own reflection. 

Supporting 144Hz refresh rate, VRR including AMD FreeSync Premium Pro, ALLM and even more gaming features, all across four HDMI 2.1 ports, the S95D covers all the gaming bases. It also comes with Samsung's Game Hub, keeping gaming-centric features in one place, incluidng cloud based gaming apps from Xbox, Luna, Nvidia GeForce Now and more. 

But it's not just features where the S95D impresses for gaming, but also its performance. We measured a super-low 8.9ms input lag time, and when paired with the S95D's stunning visual chops, it really is one of the most elite gaming TVs available. 

Aesthetically, it's also a beautiful TV, with a sleek design headlined by its 'floating' appearance, thanks to its cleverly designed stand. Built-in audio is also good, with excellent object tracking and plenty of bass. 

The S95D is definitely a premium gaming TV though, carrying a higher price tag than a lot of other gaming TVs on the market. But, if you can stretch your budget to the S95D's range, it's well worth it. 

Read our full Samsung S95D review

An ideal 120Hz OLED TV for PS5

Sony A80L TV on a table showing a movie selection

(Image credit: Future)
A great 120Hz TV, but with some limitations compared to others

Specifications

Available sizes: 55, 65, 77 and 83-inches
Panel Type: OLED
Input lag: 16.5ms
Refresh rate: 120Hz
VRR: HDMI forum
ALLM: Yes
HDMI 2.1: 2

Reasons to buy

+
Beautifully refined picture quality
+
Strong, immersive sound

Reasons to avoid

-
Only two full HDMI 2.1 ports
-
Limited brightness
Buy it if:

✅ You want great sound with your games: The Sony A80L has a powerful and immersive built-in sound that will add that extra layer to your games. 

✅ You want a quality image for your PS5: The Sony A80L's excellent contrast and perfect for PS5 HDR tone mapping create a brilliant image for your PS5 games. 

Don't buy it if:

You want the full suite of gaming features: Sadly, you can't have Dolby Vision and 4K 120hz running at the same time on the Sony A80L. 

❌You want the best value OLED for gaming: The Sony A80L is priced higher than a lot of its rivals including the Samsung S90C and LG C3. 

The Sony A80L is a mid-range OLED from Sony that performs extremely well, delivering incredible 4K clarity, a beautifully refined picture, deep blacks and color handling that we called “mesmerizingly precise” in our review. There are also a bunch of top gaming features here, as well as support for Sony's 'Perfect for PS5' features, which include a special HDR mode just for the console, and custom gaming settings depending on the genre.

It replaces the 2022 version – the Sony A80K – in our list and the major addition here is a new XR Clear Image feature. This promises cleaner and crisper 4K upscaling of any sub-4K imagery. But otherwise the XR OLED Contrast Pro, color-related XR Triluminos Pro and XR OLED Motion features are unchanged between the two models. This is no bad thing considering that Sony’s Cognitive XR processor achieved near-universal praise in previous iterations.

Although the picture is worth shouting about, there’s strong and immersive sound quality on offer here too. The A80L’s Acoustic Surface sound system pushes its sound directly forward into your room and places effects with more accuracy for a more impactful experience.

Although we think the Sony A80L is deserving of a place in our best 120Hz 4K TVs guide, it does come with some limitations. The main being that only two of the A80L’s HDMIs support 4K at 120Hz with VRR, and the TV can’t support Dolby Vision at 4K 120Hz at all. This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t consider it. It’s an excellent choice for buyers who want the deep contrast of OLED but don’t want to pay top dollar for the tech. But there are better gaming TVs out there if you don't want the PS5-specific features.

Read our full Sony A80L review

Other 120Hz TVs to consider

Support for 120Hz gaming has become an increasingly popular feature on TVs, so numerous models we've recently reviewed didn’t make the cut for this list but are otherwise worthy of consideration.

The LG G3 OLED is an excellent option for both movies and gaming and one that competes with the Samsung S95D OLED which currently ranks as the best premium OLED TV in this guide. However, LG’s flagship OLED doesn’t match the Samsung's full-screen brightness, which is an important consideration for gaming. Otherwise, the LG G3 is stocked with gaming features, including four HDMI 2.1 inputs with 4K 120Hz support.

Anyone wanting a step-up mini-LED alternative to our budget choice, the Hisense U8K, should also look at the Samsung QN90C. This set delivers impressive brightness and has 4K 120Hz input support on all four of its HDMI 2.1 ports along with FreeSync Premium. Like other Samsung TVs, the QN90C has the company’s built-in gaming hub for cloud-based gaming via apps such as Xbox, Nvidia GeForce Now, Utomik, and others. 

A model closer to our budget pick’s price range is the Samsung Q80C. A QLED TV with a regular LED backlight instead of the mini-LED one found on the Hisense U8K, the Q80C doesn’t manage the same high brightness levels as the Hisense, but similar to the Samsung QN90C has 4K 120Hz input support on all four of its HDMI 2.1 ports along with FreeSync Premium and Samsung’s Gaming Hub.

How to choose the best 120Hz TV

Choosing the best 120Hz TV for you isn't too different from choosing any other TV – it just means that you've settled on one crucial element already (whether you want a 60Hz screen or a 120Hz screen), which means you'll be buying more from the premium end of things.

But the other questions remain open. For example, do you want an OLED or an LED TV? We've written a an OLED vs LED vs LCD guide that covers the tech types in depth, but in summary, LED has a backlight whereas OLED pixels produce their own light.

OLED might seem like the better, cooler type of tech – and in many ways it is – offering excellent contrast and viewing angles, but you might get better brightness and/or a cheaper price with an LED or mini-LED TV. Response times do tend to be better with OLED TVs, too, which means if you're after the best TV for gaming, we'd usually suggest you pick OLED – unless you play during the day in a bright room, in which case a mini-LED would be preferable.

HDMI 2.1 ports are very important, because this is what's required to receive a 4K 120Hz signal from your console. All 120Hz TVs will include at least two, but some LG and Samsung TVs comes with four HDMI 2.1 ports, and if you're a hardcore gamer who'll own multiple consoles, we strongly recommend choosing one of these.

Admittedly, some players may not notice a drastic difference when they first use a 120Hz TV with a next-gen console, but we think that refresh rates are crucial for certain games. For example, you'll really be able to see a difference in fast-paced shooters or racing games, where quick reflexes and frame pacing counts.

It might seem like an obvious consideration, but bear size in mind when you're looking for a new 120Hz 4K TV. If you're going to be using it as your main screen, you'll need to be sure it fits into the space you have available. If it'll be in a second room specifically for gaming, you might not want to go for the biggest available size but instead choose a small display, such as the LG C3, which is available at 42 inches.

And don't forget sound. A lot of TVs don't have great built-in speakers, but some are better than others. If you'll play mostly with a headset, then that's no problem either way. If you already own one of the best soundbars, or are happy to buy one, then that solves the problem too. But if you don't want any extras, look out for TVs we've mentioned as including great audio.

What TVs are coming in 2024?

So far in 2024, we've seen a lot of new TVs announced, a lot of which carry 120Hz (and 144Hz) support. 

The most notable that we've spotted so far is the LG B4, as this new model is getting 4x HDMI 2.1 ports with 4K 120Hz support, which could make it one of the top 120Hz TVs and best gaming TVs of 2024. Also from LG, we're getting the LG C4 and LG G4, both of which will now support up to 144Hz for PC gaming as well. 

Samsung is releasing several new models including its two QD-OLEDs, the Samsung S90D and Samsung S95D. Samsung also unveiled its mini-LED TV lineup for 2024, which will include the Samsung QN900D - an 8K, 'floating' gaming TV. 

As for other brands TCL announced its new mini-LED TVs for 2024 and Hisense also continued its mini-LED loyalty with its 2024 lineup, and a lot of the TVs in the two brands' range support 120Hz.

For UK based gamers, Panasonic's new Fire TV 2024 OLEDs will support 120Hz and Philips confirmed a lot of its 2024 OLEDs will support up to 144Hz as well. 

We haven't been able to get a full, gaming testing with these models yet but once we do, we'll be sure to update this guide with our impressions. 

120Hz panel: why does it matter?

Do refresh rates really matter enough to justify buying a new television set? We'd argue that without an advanced television, the upgraded hardware in your new Sony or Microsoft console becomes superfluous. All that power won't translate into better performance unless your TV can support it.

Hertz, or refresh rate, determines the number of frames that your television can display per second. Because both the PS5 and Xbox Series X can generate 120 frames per second (fps) in 4K UHD resolution, you need a television panel that works up to 120 Hertz to make that mode work. 

An older 4K TV likely can only support 60Hz/4K. That worked perfectly well with the Xbox One X and PS4 Pro, both of which could hit 60fps in 4K for some games.

With a higher refresh rate in 4K, you'll see a smoother and sharper output on the television with less nauseating motion blurring when you turn the camera quickly in-game. This is particularly handy for fast-paced shooters where you need to turn on a dime and react quickly to threats. But the visual boost from increased frames isn't limited to any one genre of game. 

Several of our top picks feature a 144Hz refresh rate. This isn't an essential upgrade over 120Hz in our opinion – read our guide to whether 144Hz TVs are a big deal for why – but the option is there for hardcore PC gamers who might want to try it.

A man playing a video game in a large room on a Samsung TV

(Image credit: Samsung)

HDMI 2.1: What does it do?

HDMI 2.1 is a more powerful data transfer standard that improves your television's capacity to handle high refresh rates and resolutions simultaneously. That said, this new standard also adds two other important gaming features by default: Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM). 

VRR is a tool that enables your TV to automatically adjust its Hz based on the output from your gaming console. While the Xbox Series X and PS5 offer a 120Hz 4K maximum, individual games' frame rates will fluctuate and drop based on what's happening on screen. The more frames you drop, the more tearing and stuttering you'll see as the television tries to adjust.

With VRR activated, your television will adjust its refresh rate on the fly so it never deviates from the game's fps output. That way, even if the game performance is struggling, the gameplay will remain smooth and seamless.

As for ALLM, it detects when you're playing a video game and adjusts your TV settings on the fly to reduce input lag as much as possible. It's a simple but essential feature that ensures you don't need to switch manually from Game to Cinema mode over and over.

Here's the problem, though: the HDMI Forum recently changed the rules, meaning that HDMI ports can now be labelled as HDMI 2.1 even if they don't support all of these features. So you can't just look for 'HDMI 2.1' in the specs and know you're covered, you'll need to check for these features specifically.

For more on the differences between refresh rate, input lag and refresh time, read our guide: Input lag and monitor speed explained.

How we test the best 120Hz TVs

We review TVs with a range of different content. Of course, next-gen gaming takes priority in this guide, but we imagine you'll also want to know what movies and TV shows are like to watch as well.

In order to test the input lag, we use a Leo Bodnar 4K HDMI Video Signal Lag Tester, which sends a signal to the TV and measures how quickly that signal is visible using its own sensor. We use colorimeter to test the brightness levels and color accuracy of the TVs, in conjunction with a bit-perfect test pattern generator to create the images that are measured. We connect a latest-gen game console to ensure that features such as 4K 120Hz support, variable refresh rate, or Dolby Vision gaming work as expected.

As well as judging all of the key specs you need in a gaming TV, such as refresh rates and HDMI connection options, we're also looking for good picture quality, vibrant colors and viewing angles to suit all kinds of rooms.

Sound is less of a priority with most gaming TVs as you'll get the best experience from gaming headphones or a soundbar, but it's always good to know you'll get a decent built-in experience. Which is why we've also detailed what it was like to listen to these TVs without additional devices, too.

Because we've reviewed many TVs over the years – and many of the best gaming TVs – all of our testing isn't done in isolation, but takes into account what else is available, so we only recommend the options most worth your time.

The latest updates to this best 120Hz TVs guide

June 7 2024
Swapped the LG C3 for the LG C4 as the 'Best 120Hz TV for sizes'. The LG C3 is still a great TV and will be cheaper than the C4, but the C4's improved brightness and processing are perfect for 120Hz gaming, especially in brightly lit rooms, so we made the change. 

10 May 2024
Swapped the Samsung S95C for the Samsung S95D as the 'Best premium OLED'. The S95C is still available, and great value after price drops, but the S95D's new Glare Free reflection-beating screen is really valuable for gaming in sunlit rooms, so we've replaced the old model immediately.

11 April 2024
Updated with testing results graphs, to make it easy to compare our TVs recommendations.

Matt Bolton
Managing Editor, Entertainment

Matt is TechRadar's Managing Editor for Entertainment, meaning he's in charge of persuading our team of writers and reviewers to watch the latest TV shows and movies on gorgeous TVs and listen to fantastic speakers and headphones. It's a tough task, as you can imagine. Matt has over a decade of experience in tech publishing, and previously ran the TV & audio coverage for our colleagues at T3.com, and before that he edited T3 magazine. During his career, he's also contributed to places as varied as Creative Bloq, PC Gamer, PetsRadar, MacLife, and Edge. TV and movie nerdism is his speciality, and he goes to the cinema three times a week. He's always happy to explain the virtues of Dolby Vision over a drink, but he might need to use props, like he's explaining the offside rule.

With contributions from