Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, Sir Bob Geldof and Chrissie Hynde have recorded a reworked version of folk classic 'Chicago', as part of the campaign to convince US President Barack Obama to allow McKinnon to be tried in the UK.

The question over who is funding McKinnon's protracted and spirited legal battle has become increasingly prevalent in recent weeks.

While considerable financial and moral support has come from various sources in recent months - donations via McKinnon's own supporters (organised via the website freegary.org.uk) and, no doubt, considerable legal aid support from the state, the addition of a PR company stage managing a veritable welter of high-profile campaigning celebrities has taken the 'justice for McKinnon' campaign to a totally different level.

How did the story of this outsider computer hacker become front-page news on the likes of the Daily Mail? Not to mention, how has McKinnon and his supporters managed to inspire some of the world's most high-profile pop and rock stars to record a campaign song for him?

Interestingly, a new BBC report reveals that McKinnon has a PR company London-based Bell Yard - working 'pro bono' ("for the public good") on his behalf.

And it looks like they've been working pretty hard, if the recent spike in the number of national newspaper column inches (not to mention McKinnon's celebrity supporters and friends) is anything to go by.

Bob Geldof, Pink Floyd

Aside from the pop 'anthem', London Mayor Boris Johnson affectionately refers to McKinnon as a "classic British nut job" that believes in "little green men".

Nick Hornby, Keith Duffy, Terry Waite, Marillion's Mark Kelly, Jilly Cooper and others are all quoted or mentioned in the recent BBC feature on McKinnon's transformation from outsider geek to international 'cause celebre'.

TechRadar will be certainly watching the developments in the McKinnon case closely over the coming weeks.

And you can see the campaign song via YouTube right here:

Via BBC