AMD has officially announced three new processors, including a top-of-the range 90nm-based Athlon 64 X2 and the first AMD 65nm single core chips.

Top of the pile is the new AMD Athlon 64 X2 dual-core 6000. Similar to the 5600, the 90 nm 6000 has 2MB of L2 cache. Trouble is, it operates at 3.0GHz, so we're not exactly expecting it to run coolly.

Indeed, the new chip is eerily reminiscence of Intel's last 90nm Pentium 4-driven attempt to catch up with AMD, Prescott. That generation of Pentium 4 was the hottest and most power hungry of the Pentium 4 chips. And since the advent of Core 2 Duo, it's AMD running to catch up with Intel.

The new chips aren't yet on AMD's website, but the X2 is clearly available on the pages of some leading e-tailers.

And, as if by coincidence, AMD also announced two single core chips in the same release - inferring that all the new chips are for 'energy-conscious' users.

The Athlon 64 3500 and 3800 run at 45W, so they are indeed much more efficient. This is largely because these single core chips use the 65nm process only previously used by AMD for it's X2 range.