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The Xbox Series X 1TB Storage Expansion Card costs $220 / £220 – pre-orders now live

(Image credit: Seagate)
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Microsoft has opened pre-orders for the Xbox Series X 1TB Storage Expansion Card, which is designed by Seagate. The proprietary storage solution is priced at $219.99 / £220 and slots into the rear of both the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S.

The Xbox Series X comes with 1TB of super-fast storage, while the Xbox Series S ships with 512GB. Priced at $499 / £449 and $299 / £249 respectively, if you were to buy the Storage Expansion Card alongside Microsoft’s cheaper Xbox Series S, you’d end up spending $520 / £469 in total for 1.5TB of storage

Microsoft claims that games for the Xbox Series S will be 30% smaller in size than their Xbox Series X counterparts, as they won’t require 4K textures. This means that the internal NVMe SSD should go a bit further than at first glance, but space will still be at a premium.

It’s worth noting that Xbox One, Xbox 360 and original Xbox games can be stored on an external hard drive. You can also store games that are optimized for the new Xbox Velocity Architecture on an external hard drive, though you’ll need to transfer them over to the console’s internal SSD or Expansion Card when you want to play them.

Microsoft has outlined how the new storage system works, and why the Expansion Card is so pricey in a detailed Q&A on Xbox Wire. It's an interesting read if you're new to the world of NVMe SSDs.

Looking for a new console? Find out where to buy Xbox Series X and where to buy Xbox Series S. Or, if you're thinking of siding with Sony this generation, you'll want to find out how to buy PS5.

Xbox 1TB Storage Expansion Card US

Seagate 1TB Game Drive for Xbox Series X, Series S:

Seagate 1TB Game Drive for Xbox Series X and Series S: $219.99 at Best Buy

Seagate 1TB Game Drive for Xbox Series X and Series S: $219.99 at Best Buy
You can instantly expand the storage of the Xbox Series X or Xbox Series S with Seagate's 1TB Storage Expansion Card. Experience faster load times, and improve the performance of Xbox, Xbox 360 and Xbox One games. 

Seagate 1TB Game Drive for Xbox Series X and Series S: $219.99 at Microsoft Store

Seagate 1TB Game Drive for Xbox Series X and Series S: $219.99 at Microsoft Store

The Xbox Series X or Xbox Series S 1TB Storage Expansion Card is available directly from the Microsoft Store. Just plug it into the back of either console to experience faster load times.

Xbox 1TB Storage Expansion Card UK

Seagate 1TB Game Drive for Xbox Series X and Series S: £219.99 at Microsoft Store

Seagate 1TB Game Drive for Xbox Series X and Series S: £219.99 at Microsoft Store
Expect to pay a premium for the Seagate 1TB Game Drive in the UK, as Microsoft has priced the expandable storage at £219.99. That's £30 less than an Xbox Series S.

Expansion plans

Comparatively, the PS5 comes with 825GB of storage. Sony has previously said that the console will be compatible with Sony-certified, off-the-shelf NVMe SSDs, but these drives must match the PS5’s internal SSD’s bandwidth specifications. It’s also unclear whether any new drive would replace the internal SSD solution, or expand upon the existing storage. If it’s anything like the PS3 and PS4’s storage solutions, it’s likely to serve as a replacement. 

Microsoft has stated that additional sizes will be available in the future, but as we’ve seen with current NVMe SSDs, the price tends to increase exponentially the more storage a drive includes. The Xbox Series X/S 1TB Storage Expansion Card will be available when both the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S launch on November 10, 2020. 

Adam Vjestica

Adam is a Senior Gaming Writer at TechRadar. A law graduate with an exceptional track record in content creation and online engagement, Adam has penned scintillating copy for various technology sites and also established his very own award-nominated video games website. He’s previously worked at Nintendo of Europe as a Content Marketing Editor and once played Halo 5: Guardians for over 51 hours for charity. (He’s still recovering to this day.)