The controversy around Call of Duty: Modern Warfare's 2 already infamous terrorist mission underlines the need for a strong ratings body – according to PEGI.

The Pan European Gaming Institute (PEGI) will today be named in the Queen's speech as the body chosen by the Digital Britain report to decide age ratings for games in the UK.

Communications manager Dirk Bosmans told TechRadar that the furore from some of the media over CoD: MW2 shows the continued need for education over ratings.

Terrorist

The latest Call of Duty game has shot to the top of the sales charts, despite the likes of the Daily Mail's criticism over an optional and, frankly, odd mission in which the player participates in (or passively follows) a terrorist attack on a Russian airport.

However, it has been rightly pointed out that the game is clearly marked for adults only, with an 18 certificate on the box, and that children should not be allowed to play it.

"I sure hope that this illustrates how important games ratings are," said Bosmans.

"There was a multitude of people who could easily break down arguments that gaming as a whole was inappropriate over this one incident.

"This kind of public debate is good for a system like PEGI – it shows it can work well and that education is still necessary."

Education, education, education

Education remains a key part of PEGI's plans – with Bosmans suggesting that there is a growing generation of gamers now having kids who understand the system – but still a large group that do not have this level of understanding.

"It's a step by step process that we can help to speed up but it will take a little bit more time," added Bosmans.

"There is a games generation that have known games since being able to read – we are having kids ourselves and that is a generation of parents who are aware of games and other digital behaviour and the risks that come with that.

"Next to that, there is still a large group that aren't familiar. We try to reach out to make them aware.

"PEGI will jut keep hammering out the message and trying to help educate parents."