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Best Super Mario games: from Bros. to Odyssey, NES to Switch

Best Super Mario games
(Image credit: Nintendo)

With the Super Mario franchise's 35th Anniversary celebrations still in full swing, what better time would there be to rank the best Mario games from across the length and breadth of the Italian plumber’s legacy?

This is a hard thing to do on a few levels, because 2D and 3D Mario games are so fundamentally different that they're hard to compare – not to mention the number of genre games the portly plumber has popped up in.

Still, we ranked them anyway, based on a quick poll of the TechRadar team's favorites. While we stuck to just mainline Super Mario entries for the main ranked list, we've thrown in a decent amount of spin-offs and other great Mario games into the honorable mentions section toward the bottom of the article.

While you might have to jump down a few warp pipes to nab yourself a copy of some of these Super Mario games, most are available on the Nintendo Switch in both physical and digital formats, as well as Nintendo Switch Online’s NES & Super NES emulation platform. 

Best Super Mario games: ranked

Super Mario 64

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario 64
Nintendo 64 / Nintendo DS / Virtual Console (various)

The most important game on this list? Probably. With 3D games still in their infancy, and full analogue control something of a pipe-dream and then-brand-new Nintendo 64 needing a flagship title, Super Mario 64 was a revelation. Bringing Mario into the 3D realm, Mario 64 had pinpoint-accurate control with the 64 pad’s mandatory analogue stick, and a wonderfully reimagined universe taking advantage of polygons over pixels.

That it is so playable today still speaks volumes on how near-perfect the game is, with its bold color palette and chunky level design holding up incredibly well today still. It’s exploration-tinged platforming proved the model for practically every 3D platformer that followed (not to mention influencing every game developer making their first steps into 3D game design), with Mario 64 acting as the blueprint for Super Mario Odyssey and its ‘open world’ design.

A nifty Nintendo DS remake not only brought the game into a handheld form, but also added a suite of great minigames and multiplayer support. We can’t wait to see what the Nintendo Switch remaster has in store for this classic title.

Super Mario Odyssey

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario Odyssey
Nintendo Switch

Every good Nintendo console needs a good Mario game, and Super Mario Odyssey is up there with the very best the Switch has to offer – not to mention being one of Mario’s finest adventures.

Taking the open level design of Super Mario 64, and blasting open the scale thanks to the power of a more modern console, Odyssey simply oozes with ideas. Each themed world is a giant playground teeming with secrets and nods back to earlier titles. But it’s where Odyssey introduces Cappy, the sentient headwear that acts as the game’s central unique mechanic, where it comes into its own. Toss the blinky cap at an enemy and Mario will warp into its body, taking over its abilities, whether that’s a waddling Goomba or a ferocious Tyrannosaurus Rex. With the new skills each provides, once-mastered levels open up in all new ways.

Being able to take a Mario title of this scale on the go with you in handheld form was just the icing on the cake.

Super Mario World

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario World
SNES / GameBoy Advance / Nintendo Switch Online / Virtual Console (Various)

Released in 1990, Super Mario World was the first Mario title for the SNES, and it's had a special place in the hearts of gamers everywhere ever since. Signalling Nintendo’s move away from the constraints of the 8-bit era, Super Mario World introduced gamers to a whole new world of color, with bright, captivating graphics and no less than 96 levels of addictive gameplay – it’s the kind of game you can revisit time and time again without ever getting bored. Not only did the SNES allow for better graphics, it also meant that music could be composed using eight (!) sounds at once – and we think it has one of the best soundtracks of all time.

Super Mario World was also the first time we were introduced to Yoshi, Mario’s dinosaur sidekick, who you can ride like a horse throughout the side-scrolling platformer. This cute new companion combined with Super Mario World’s laid-back, kid-friendly gameplay made it a huge success, leading to multiple re-releases on a number of different consoles, as well as its own spin-off TV series.

Super Mario Galaxy 2

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario Galaxy 2
Wii

We picked Mario Galaxy 2 here to represent both entries in the series. In terms of imagination in level design, this is arguably Nintendo at its peak, taking Mario to an exciting variety of cosmic environments. With the second game, Nintendo added Yoshi to the mix. 

The Wii didn't have HD graphics, but it didn't matter with the Galaxy games. They're gorgeous, strange and incredibly exciting, with an amazing soundscape as well. Nintendo followed them up with the more conventional (but still fantastic) 3D Land and 3D World games, but there's something about these that capture the full potential of what a Mario game in 3D can look like.

Both sold massive numbers on Wii, though neither got close to the four-player New Super Mario Bros in popularity. Such was the enormity of the Wii's casual appeal as a multiplayer console. 

Super Mario Bros. 3

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario Bros. 3
NES / GameBoy Advance / Nintendo Switch Online / Virtual Console (Various)

There was something magical about Super Mario Bros. 3. For anyone that graduated from the original Mario Bros (and glossed over the insane fever dream of Mario Bros. 2) it was almost impossible to believe this new game could be played on the same console.

Multiple enemies with differing skills, new ‘states’ of Mario (the raccoon suit was amazing, being able to fly, stun and hide from enemies… although we never fully embraced the Frog Suit like we wanted to) and extra power-ups made this amazing.

We’d like to pretend we played it fully without needing to cheat and use the Warp Whistles to get to the end boss, but ultimately the lack of a ‘save’ function made it impossible to stay focused for as long as you needed - and our parents would never let us leave the Nintendo on pause overnight.

The level of detail, playability and variety in the levels, items and sub-games made Super Mario Bros. 3 a classic that pervades to this day… even writing this has made us wistfully nostalgic enough to look up how to play on modern day machines.

Super Mario Bros.

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario Bros.
NES / GameBoy Color / Nintendo Switch Online / Virtual Console (Various)

The one that started it all. From fire plants to Question Blocks, castles to princesses to warp pipes, everything that makes a Mario game a ‘Mario Game™’ made its first appearance here. 

Super Mario Bros. is in no small part responsible for the console market that we enjoy today. After the first big gaming industry crash, the market looked uncertain of recovery, with gamers instead shifting their interests to the then-sedate computer gaming market. But Nintendo, the toy-company-turned-arcade powerhouse rewrote the rule book with its family-friendly Nintendo Entertainment System. Coming with Super Mario Bros. as a pack in title secured the popularity of the plumber for decades to come. The rest is gaming history.

Super Mario 3D World

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario 3D World
Wii U

One of the least-played 3D Mario games happens to be the best, and the reports of it likely receiving a deluxe edition on Switch are most welcome. Up to four players can run around beautiful, busy and inventive levels together. You can bounce on each other's heads, and more often than not, you'll accidentally throw someone off the edge of a level. 

This is the magic of the game. It's full of physical comedy, and it's a riot to play with a friend or family member. All these interactions add a surprising amount of player expression, as you dash through a level leaving a friend behind because it's funny, or watch them slide to their deaths after a mistimed jump.

The game is an extension of the also-great Mario 3D Land on 3DS, but it's a more complete and expansive game. The game Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker is a spin-off of this Mario entry, so it only makes sense we'll have both on Switch.

Super Mario Land 2: The Six Golden Coins

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario Land 2: The Six Golden Coins
GameBoy / Virtual Console (3DS)

1989’s Super Mario Land was a great proof of concept that you could squeeze a Mario title down onto Nintendo’s handheld GameBoy, but something felt a bit...off. Mario was a strange tiny little mix of sprites, enemies weren’t what we’d gotten used to, and everything felt a bit knock-off like.

Super Mario Land 2: The Six Golden Coins, however, was the real deal. A full-fat Mario experience complete with world map, non-linear paths and mad powerups, it deserves a place on this list for its introduction of the devilish Wario, making his first ever appearance here as the game’s antagonist. It’s relatively easy as far as Mario games go – possibly a by-product of letting you take on the six creatively themed zones in any order you choose. But the final castle, Wario’s domain, offers a true challenge. Well worth revisiting.

Super Mario Sunshine

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario Sunshine
GameCube

Super Mario Sunshine was a joyful, if undervalued game – whose biggest drawback was that it launched on a GameCube console with a limited audience compared to the huge unit sales of its successor, the Nintendo Wii.

Still, for those who played it, Super Mario Sunshine was astonishingly fun. The story takes place on a tropical island getaway for Mario, Princess Peach, and Toad to Isle Delfino. Finally, a holiday! Things go awry, however, when a Mario-lookalike with a magic paintbrush starts painting graffiti all over the island town.

With a case of mistaken identity, and even some family drama between Bowser and his offspring, the dramatic stakes were high. Even if cleaning graffiti isn’t the most exciting gameplay mechanic on paper, the variety of functions in Sunshine’s F.L.U.D.D. water blaster made for excellent platforming, especially with the game’s later upgrades.

Super Mario Maker

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario Maker
Nintendo 3DS

You can’t talk about the best Mario games without mentioning Super Mario Maker – a game that lets you make Super Mario levels for yourself. Turning one of the most famous gaming franchises into a DIY playkit was a stroke of genius, with life-long fans now able to ape the gorgeous simplicity of Mario’s jumps and fireballs, or create hellish nightmare-scapes that were near impossible to complete.

The original game was released on Nintendo 3DS, finding a perfect home on the dual-screen hardware, which enabled gamers to view their levels on one screen and the game’s multiple menus of items and monsters on the other.

The follow-up Nintendo Switch version was certainly more accessible, with the majority of items and designs available from the get-go – with an assist mode for the campaign too – though the single screen did feel a bit crowded for everything the level editor was able to do.

Best Super Mario games: honorable mentions

Bowser's Fury

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Bowser’s Fury
Nintendo Switch

Bowser’s Fury is a game that asks: what if Bowser was evil? Like, really evil? Well, he’d be 50 feet tall, shrouded in chaotic black goo and looming over your each and every step. That’s the Bowser’s Fury interpretation of the usually goofy king of the Koopas, anyway, and the game is wonderfully unique because of it.

In what might be a prototype open-world format for future Mario titles, Bowser’s Fury presents a seamless, explorable world without the need to hop between loading screens. Mario and Bowser Jr. form an unlikely alliance to stop Bowser from wreaking havoc in his new, powerful form.

It’s a fantastic expansion to Super Mario 3D World, and comes bundled with that game’s Nintendo Switch port. If you’re hungry for more 3D Mario after finishing Super Mario Odyssey, then Bowser’s Fury should absolutely be your next port of call.

Super Mario Maker 2

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario Maker 2
Nintendo Switch

It’s Super Mario Maker, but just even more of it. What’s not to love? Well, the Switch doesn’t quite benefit from the ingenious way in which Super Mario Maker used the Wii U’s GamePad screen, but once you’re over the editing hurdles, making your own Super Mario levels has never felt this grandiose.

Super Mario Maker 2 packs all the content of the original game (minus the fun amiibo character transformations) and then proceeds to cram it full of even more stuff. The new additions include a sizable story mode, Super Mario 3D World power-ups and assets and an overworld maker that lets you string levels together.

We hope the Super Mario Maker subseries sees even more releases going forward, either on the Switch or on future Nintendo consoles. Surely, the next logical step would be Super Mario Maker 3D? Only time will tell.

  • Super Mario Maker 2 is available on the US Nintendo eShop at a discounted Mar10 Day price. You can get the game for $38.99 if you buy it before March 13. 

Luigi's Mansion 3

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Luigi’s Mansion 3
Nintendo Switch

While it may lack the surprisingly tense atmosphere of the original Gamecube title, Luigi’s Mansion 3 more than makes up for it in pretty much every other way. It’s a visually striking adventure game that puts Luigi back on the vac, sucking up ghosts and traipsing through a haunted hotel in order to save his Mushroom Kingdom comrades.

  • If you want to show Luigi your love and support in this trying time, you can pick up Luigi’s Mansion 3 as part of the Mar10 Day discounts on the US Nintendo eShop for $38.99 until March 13. 

Mario Tennis Aces

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Mario Tennis Aces
Nintendo Switch

Mario Tennis Aces is a remarkable return to form after the Wii U’s disastrous Mario Tennis Ultra Smash. A story mode, tons of match options and variants and a solid online experience make Mario Tennis Aces one of the better Mario sports outings in recent years.

The game received a healthy amount of post-launch support from Nintendo, adding new characters, modes and online optimizations via a multitude of free updates.

  • Want to hit the courts yourself? Mario Tennis Aces is part of the Mar10 Day discounts on the US Nintendo eShop, available for $38.99 until March 13. 

Super Mario Bros. 2

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario Bros. 2
NES / GameBoy Advance / Nintendo Switch Online / Virtual Console (Various)

The second game in the Super Mario Bros. trilogy is definitely the odd one out, but it remains a quirky and unique platformer all these years later. Super Mario Bros. 2 is actually a reskin of a Japanese game called Doki Doki Panic - it was given a Mario coat of paint and sold as Super Mario Bros. 2 in the west.

It’s arguably better than the actual Super Mario Bros. 2 from Japan, which was more in line with the original game, albeit with a crushingly high level of difficulty. That version eventually released in the west under the title of Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels.

If you’re curious, you can try out both Super Mario Bros. 2 and Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels for yourself quite easily. If you subscribe to the Nintendo Switch Online service, both games can be played via the NES library included with the subscription.

Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door
Nintendo Gamecube

Arguably the pinnacle of the Paper Mario series of RPGs, Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door was one of the Gamecube’s finest, and to this day has fans clamoring for a re-release. 

The game features a cute papercraft aesthetic that presents a massive world to explore loaded with secrets, characters and plenty of turn-based battling. Oh, the story’s pretty good, too.

It’s unfortunately not the easiest game to get a hold of, with boxed copies typically exceeding $100. You’ll also need a Gamecube, which certainly isn’t as hard to find, but is an additional cost nonetheless. Still, if you’re lucky enough to find a copy, Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door might just become your next favorite Mario game.

Super Mario Party

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario Party
Nintendo Switch

Much like Mario Tennis Aces, Super Mario Party went back to the series’ roots after a string of questionably designed entries in the series. Traditional board game play returns, along with a swathe of new minigames to enjoy with your friends.

Sadly, the online mode leaves a lot to be desired, only featuring a random assortment of minigames for players to compete in. That’s right, the full Party Mode experience is limited to offline play. Thanks, Nintendo.

  • Still, Super Mario Party is absolutely a step in the right direction for the series, and worth picking up on the US Nintendo eShop at the Mar10 Day discounted price of $38.99 until March 13.

Mario Strikers Charged

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Mario Strikers Charged
Wii

Mario Strikers Charged comes courtesy of Next Level Games, who also developed Luigi’s Mansion 3, so already we can attest to the game’s insane level of quality. But wait, a Mario soccer game? How good could that possibly be? Pretty damn good, it turns out.

Mario Strikers Charged is definitely the edgiest game in the entire series. The game has a very aggressive art style, and it’s relatively violent, with characters ramming into each other at full pelt - sometimes into electric fences.

Thankfully, the game plays superbly as well. Shooting is an absolute joy, with players able to score up to six goals at once depending on the quality of their shots. It’s absolutely mad, but that’s what makes Mario Strikers Charged so good and so desperately in need of a Nintendo Switch follow-up.

If you want to see what all the fuss is about, copies of the game are available online at mostly affordable prices. Just make sure you own a Wii or Wii U console to play it on.

Super Mario Galaxy

(Image credit: Nintendo / Forbes)

Super Mario Galaxy
Wii

While the sequel is arguably the better of the two, the first Super Mario Galaxy is still one of the best games in the entire series. It was a fantastic return to form for 3D Mario when it released back in 2007, and introduced unique aspects to the series’ platforming with the ability to blast through space to explore spherical planetoids.

Super Mario Galaxy also boasted a stunning orchestral score, and despite the limited power of the Wii, the game is still graphically impressive 14 years later.

Super Mario Galaxy is typically only available on the Wii, there is another way to play it if you act fast. Super Mario 3D All-Stars, which features Super Mario Galaxy, is available to buy on the Nintendo Switch until March 31 when Nintendo will (bafflingly) delist the compilation.

Mario Kart 8 Deluxe

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Mario Kart 8 Deluxe
Nintendo Switch

There’s a reason why Mario Kart 8 Deluxe is the Nintendo Switch’s best-selling game. Not only is it the best game in the Mario Kart series, it’s quite frankly one of the best racing games, period.

Mario Kart 8 Deluxe packs in all the DLC from the original Wii U version, and adds some extras of its own, including Splatoon characters and a completely revamped Battle Mode that’s leagues ahead of the one featured in the Wii U release.

Mario Kart 8 Deluxe simply gets everything right. The game is easily one of the most visually impressive games Nintendo has ever made, and has a catchy, jazz-infused soundtrack to match. A solid 60fps performance keeps the action fast and fluid, and the online connectivity actually functions pretty well for a Nintendo game.