Desk Doctor diagnoses and offers treatment for posture problems and repetitive strain. We're not doctors, but there's sensible physiotherapy advice on offer here, rather than just motherly advice.

There are three stages to Desk Doctor, starting with an assessment of your current condition. You're asked to point out where you commonly feel pain using your mouse and an onscreen model as a guide. You then add detail about your pain from a list of options, including things like whether the pain is 'sharp' or 'gently pulling', and answer further questions about how long you have had this symptom.

Desk Doctor then runs you through a sequence of gentle exercises to do in your chair. You bend and swivel following the text and video instructions. After each exercise you give feedback on how the pain changed, and whether the pain was specific to one side of your body or not.

At the end of this second stage, which takes about 30 minutes to complete, the software lists your responses in a tidy little report. If it thinks you have something serious then it flags that part of the report in red type and recommends that you visit a doctor, a caution that echoes throughout the software.

The final stage is the suggested exercise regime to relieve the symptoms. These are mostly stretches to do at your desk and are all provided with video explainers, written text and optional audio.

Desk Doctor comes with a built-in scheduler to remind you when to take a break and to do your exercises, and there's a points system to show you how well you are doing.

We really like Desk Doctor. Everything works, it didn't crash once, and the quality of the videos, navigation and reports are first class. The price is high, but cheaper than the damage it's trying to prevent.