The theory, at least, is sound.

The 'rotate' in the i-Station's name refers to the fact that while you dock your iPod or iPhone in the traditional way – vertically down, with the Dock connector at the bottom – the whole cradle mechanism can slide over to the right and rotate 90° anti-clockwise so that the player sits in a landscape format.

While this isn't useful for classic iPods or third-gen nanos, it's potentially a big deal for owners of the touch and iPhone.

And that's because when either plays video, naturally they want to do so landscape – 'sideways' if you will – rather than the 'straight up and down' portrait orientation that they usually sit in. We like the i-Station Rotate's approach and it looks neater too, with the landscape iPhone following the top line of the speaker system rather than taking the usual approach and having it sticking up out of the top.

Underwhelming sound quality

Its unique design means it doesn't use the regular and easy replaceable Universal Dock adaptors, but mounts are included for iPhone 3G, iPhone, iPod touch (first and second gen), nano (third and fourth gen) and iPod classic, so you're likely to be okay.

Unfortunately, the quality of the audio is distinctly average. The entire audio spectrum is cold and unwelcoming, and moderately high frequency sounds – particularly the ever-present sound of a snare drum marking out a beat –have a piercing and strident quality that's quite unpleasant.

Straight acoustic tracks – with just a singer plus a guitar or a piano –are tolerable, but even then there's no soul to the music. Other speakers that exhibit these characteristics frequency usually have big, flabby bass to compensate, but the i-Station 3 Rotate doesn't even have that.

For this reason we recommend you stick with Logitech's Pure-Fi Anywhere unless you must have the landscape orientation option.