Apple has all but officially confirmed the launch of its iPhone 5 Sept. 12, thanks largely to a "5" hiding in plain sight on its invites to an event that day.

While we can expect the next-gen iPhone to hold the quintuplet moniker, Apple has reportedly been referring to the iOS handset as "N42."

No one will call the iPhone 5 by its company codename, but it's important to note the reference when talking about how much the device is going to cost you at the register.

According to a published report, the iPhone N42's (aka the iPhone 5's) price points mirror those of the iPhone 4S.

Dollars, colors and GBs

Taken from a "well-known U.S. retail chain," the iPhone 5 should be priced in the U.S. as follows:

  • N42A-USA: $199
  • N42B-USA: $199
  • N42A-USA: $299
  • N42B-USA: $299
  • N42A-USA: $399
  • N42B-USA: $399

"A" and "B" indicate black and white. The price jumps are presumably related to 16GB, 32GB and 64GB variations, as is the case with the iPhone 4S on a two-year deal.

TechRadar predicted this 4S-based pricing scheme, citing the likelihood the phone will probably be an evolutionary step in the iPhone line, a la the Siri-packing smartphone.

If we see some revolutionary technology next Wednesday, then perhaps these prices will be rendered completely bogus.

But from the leaks we've seen, it's likely the phone is a retooled though not necessarily groundbreaking device.

Apple might offer a 128GB version, though you can expect to pay a load more for that capacity.

Order up

Sources speaking with 9to5Mac say pre-ordering should start soon after the iPhone 5's unveiling, though many international customers will have to wait to get them as shipping won't begin immediately.

New, iPhone 5-specific accessories like cables, cases and adapters (pluggable into an eight- or nine-pin dock, of course) are also reportedly set to ship with what will surely be a hot commodity.

Until next week, check out the latest on the iPhone 5 rumors, release date and more, and tune in Wednesday to see how close we were in our predictions.

Via 9to5Mac