The jury is still out on the need for cameras on tablets, as generally they are just too big and clunky to be used as traditional snappers. Unfortunately that doesn't seem to have stopped the army of iPad photographers in the world.

And it's probably that popularity which is partly encouraging other manufacturers to equip their slates with rear cameras and well as the front facing options for video chats.

The LG G Pad 8.3 is no exception here with a 5MP lens slapped on its rear, while round the front you get a 1.3MP offering which suffices for video calls and the odd selfie but is otherwise best avoided.

There's no flash to accompany the 5MP sensor on the back of the G Pad 8.3, so you'll want to make sure you're in reasonably well lit surroundings before firing up the camera application.

Considering this is a tablet, the camera app on the G Pad 8.3 is surprisingly well stocked with various modes and features - keeping any budding paparazzi out there happy.

Fire up the app and hit mode and you'll be greeted with a range of options including HDR, panorama, beauty shot, night and sports.

There's also continuous shot which takes six photos consecutively, while time machine is a clever feature which lets you track the progress of a moving object in an image to produce a cool effect.

Tap the settings cog and you'll be offered up even more options including ISO, brightness and white balance controls as well as a timer and voice shutter - the latter of which requires you to say "cheese", "smile", or "whiskey" to trigger the shutter.

The color effect section is one for the Instagram generation, but with just three options (mono, sepia and negative) the G Pad 8.3 is unlikely to impress here.

Shutter speed is blazingly fast thanks to the 1.7GHz quad-core chip inside the G Pad, and it means you're able to snap photos in quick succession without having to wait around between each one.

LG has made it easier to take photos with the G Pad 8.3 as you can use the volume switch on the right of the tablet as a physical shutter key, saving you from stretching you hand to the on-screen button.

You can change the volume rocker to a zoom control, but we found it to be far more useful as a shutter and pinching the display to zoom in and out.

Images on whole leave a lot to be desired, especially ones taken indoors, with the G Pad 8.3 struggling to produce defined pictures and decent color reproduction.

Most of our images were serviceable, but noticeably granular and the auto-focus did struggle from time to time. We found macro to be incredibly hit and miss, so if you want to get close up you're going to need a lot of patience.

LG G Pad 8.3 review
Photos tend to lack bright color

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LG G Pad 8.3 review
Things get blurry in the distance

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LG G Pad 8.3 review
Moving targets can be a little tricky

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LG G Pad 8.3 review
In the right light you can get a decent photo

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LG G Pad 8.3 review
Macro does work from time to time

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LG G Pad 8.3 review
Sometimes the focus will refuse to settle close up

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LG G Pad 8.3 review
Clear, yet grainy indoor photo with some natural light

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LG G Pad 8.3 review
The G Pad 8.3 does tend to struggle with variable light

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LG G Pad 8.3 review
Turn HDR on though and images are improved

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Video recording is pegged at full HD quality (30fps) on the LG Pad 8.3, but it doesn't produce the same results as we've seen on the likes of the Samsung Galaxy S4 or LG G2.

The 5MP sensor on the rear of the tablet can only do so much, and while the footage is fine for the odd clip here and there you won't be shooting movies of the LG G Pad anytime soon.

You can access the video recorder by loading up the camera app and then sliding the switch next to the shutter from camera to video.

The volume key comes into play once again here, with the ability for it to be either the record button or the zoom key - and you can zoom in and out while filming.