Nikon P7700 review

Premium compact camera explored

TODO alt text

Using the Nikon P7700, it's easy to see that this a marked improvement over previous P series cameras, especially in terms of aesthetics and design.

Now a camera that is much more pocketable, it still retains all the mode dials and manual controls that appeal to the more advanced photographer.

Image quality is generally pretty good, though it's not any better than rival cameras in the market, and is a worse performer than cameras such as the Sony RX100, which features a larger sensor in what is a smaller body.

That said, it does have other benefits, such as the articulating screen and a hotshoe for adding accessories. If you don't shoot in low light conditions very often, and want the benefit of a longer zoom range than some of the other competitors on the market, this is a very tempting proposition.

We liked

Nikon has worked hard to produce a camera that is visually appealing, with dials and function buttons beckoning to serious photographers who want quick access to their most commonly used settings.

We disliked

Unfortunately, shot-to-shot time is seriously slow, leading to missed shots and a lot of frustration waiting for the camera to catch up with you. Perhaps this is something that could be addressed by Nikon with a firmware upgrade.

Final verdict

With a raft of premium compact cameras now flooding the market in a bid to appeal to those looking for something a little more sophisticated from a compact, Nikon has produced a camera that is very likeable in many respects, with the P7700 having just a few let downs.


News Reporter

Amy (Twitter, Google+, blog) is a freelance journalist and photographer. She worked full-time as the News Reporter / Technical Writer (cameras) across Future Publishing's photography brands and TechRadar between 2009 and 2014 having become obsessed with photography at an early age. Since graduating from Cardiff Journalism School, she's also won awards for her blogging skills and photographic prowess, and once snatched exhibition space from a Magnum photographer.