Skype is introducing seamless sharing of OneDrive files

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Skype has introduced the ability for users to share OneDrive files seamlessly in a chat, and while the feature is only live for testers right now, hopefully it will roll out to the general computing population soon enough.

The latest Skype Insider Build (version 8.35.76.30) has brought in file sharing via Microsoft’s cloud storage locker.

To share a OneDrive file, when you’re in a chat with the contact you wish to share with, all you have to do is click the ‘+’ icon at the bottom of the chat window, open Content & Tools, then select OneDrive – you can then pick the relevant file (or an entire folder).

This will give your chat participant a link to the file so they can access it directly, rather than you having to manually download and transfer the file across.

Assuming your partner in chat has the relevant app installed on their device, when the link is clicked, the file will open directly in that application – otherwise, it can be opened under the OneDrive site itself, which supports preview viewing of most common file formats.

Microsoft notes that the new feature is live for testers using the Windows 10 store and desktop apps, as well as on Android and iOS, Mac and Linux Web. However, it may not have fully rolled out to all those platforms just yet.

Testing, testing…

As ever, this feature is in testing, so it might not work as expected, and there will doubtless be bugs and wrinkles to iron out. By the time it reaches the full release version of Skype, any issue should be sorted (naturally), and hopefully that won’t be too far away in the future.

All in all, it’s another useful capability for Skype, at least for those who are invested in Microsoft’s ecosystem and use OneDrive. Another notable incoming Skype feature is the ability for Windows 10 users to send money via Skype (using their PayPal account).

And as we saw earlier today, Skype calling is also now available on audio-only Alexa devices like the Amazon Echo or Echo Dot, as well as on screen-toting hardware such as the Echo Show.

Via Neowin