PlayStation Network ban incoming for all PS3 hack users

Access to Qriocity will also be barred

Sony has released a statement with regards to news that the PlayStation 3 has been hacked, explaining what the repercussions will be for those who decide to play hacked games on their console.

In short: Sony will take away all your PSN privileges, a bit like when your parents take away your console when you have been a very naughty boy.

Obviously the implications of widespread PS3 hacking are pretty severe for Sony. The PlayStation 3 has been a massive success to the company in recent years, but the majority of the time it has been on sale, it has been something of a loss-maker – the hardware behind those next-gen graphics costs a packet.

The real money has come from selling the games.

Terminated permanently

In the statement, Sony explained: "Unauthorised circumvention devices for the PlayStation 3 system have been recently released by hackers.

"Use of such devices or software violates the terms of the 'System Software License Agreement for the PlayStation 3 System' and the 'Terms of Services and User Agreement' for the PlayStation Network/Qriocity and its Community Code of Conduct provisions.

"Copying or playing pirated software is a violation of International Copyright Laws. Consumers using circumvention devices or running unauthorised or pirated software will have access to the PlayStation Network and access to Qriocity services through PlayStation 3 system terminated permanently."

Sony also notes that using this homebrew kit will void any warranty you have on your system.

"To avoid this, consumers must immediately cease use and remove all circumvention devices and delete all unauthorised or pirated software from their PlayStation 3 systems," the statement continues.

Sony seems intent in nipping piracy in the bud before it starts – but is stopping access to the PSN really going to deter users?



Content Team Lead

Marc (Twitter, Google+) is the content team lead for Future Technology, where he is in charge of a 14-strong team of journalists who write many of the wonderful stories that end up on TechRadar, and T3 magazine. Prior to this he was deputy editor of TechRadar, had a 10-month stint editing a weekly iPad magazine, written film reviews for a whole host of publications and has been an integral part of many magazines that are no longer with us.