Microsoft and Sony's next generation console reveals certainly drummed up a lot of interest in what both companies are doing in regards to the future of gaming.

While the response to Sony's PS4 reveal was largely enthusiastic, the same could not be said for the Xbox One unveiling Microsoft put together in May.

Partial reasoning for the lack of support for the Xbox One stems from the way Microsoft presented the console as an all-in-one device for the living room, rather than the gaming console devoted fans had been eagerly anticipating.

Sony didn't make that mistake, as a series of high-profile games were trotted out during its February event, and this week further clarified its stance the PS4 was meant to play games first, and everything else was secondary.

O RLY?

Speaking at the D11 conference on Thursday, Sony CEO Kaz Hirai talked a bit about cementing the PlayStation brand as a gaming device.

"The most important thing we need to do is agree and understand that the PS4 is a great video game console that appeals to video gamers," Hirai said.

"If we miss that part, I don't think we get the initial establishment of the console. That formula has worked for us with all our consoles, including the PS3."

Even though the company is planning on showing off more features of the PlayStation 4 beyond its gaming capabilities down the road (and possibly at E3 2013), Hirai didn't want there to be any misconception about the PS4's purpose.

"Providing other non-game content is an area we will reveal and talk about in the coming months, but it's first and foremost a video game console," he added.

It might not come as much of a shock to the Sony faithful to hear such sentiments from Hirai, but in the wake of Microsoft's lack of details for the "hardcore" gamer crowd in regards to the Xbox One, the comments serve as a nice little dig at the competition without sounding too presumptuous.

Role reversal

Microsoft has already committed to bringing more games for the Xbox One to E3 this year, and should have a nice slate of titles for its June 10 event.

On the other hand, Sony has a lot of questions to answer beyond what games are coming, including announcements on its own used game/DRM policies, the aforementioned other features, and of course, what the PlayStation 4 will actually look like.

The next few weeks should certainly prove to be interesting as Sony has a big opportunity to capitalize on Microsoft's stumbling out of the gate, and could well distance itself in the eyes of gamers with a strong showing at E3.

Then again, the Xbox One is already smashing pre-order records, and if Microsoft manages to impress audiences with any of its exclusive games, the gap between the two rivals may not be as large as it appears today.

Via The Verge