The remote control doesn't match the design standard of the set itself. It's very angular and has thin L-shaped buttons that look cool, but aren't as easy to use as they should be. At least there's a dedicated 3D button on the handset. The 3D specs are fairly comfortable, too.

One annoyance is that when watching Sky in 3D the Sky+ remote doesn't work while the TV is in 3D mode, so you can't pause or wind forward unless you switch back to 2D mode (with the screen split in two side-by-side images). This is not a problem exclusive to Toshiba: it also seems to affect Panasonic screens.

Toshiba's Freeview EPG is unusual too with black text on white. It certainly packs in the info, with a grid of 13 channels shown over 1.5 or 2.5 hours. Aural but not visual continuity is maintained with the live broadcast.

The set's operating system has a dated feel to it, lacking the panache of models from the likes of Sony, LG and Samsung. It's by no means unpleasant to look at or work with but, as with too many screens, some functions that should be easily accessed are buried in sub-menus.

The iPlayer is user-friendly, and it's easy enough to hunt around for recently broadcast gems in HD or standard definition. Note that you can't navigate along the timeline and some shows suffer with an audio lag.

Setting up a wireless connection with a BT Home Hub proved straightforward but a Toshiba Windows 7 netbook required a wired Ethernet connection. File playback is unsurprisingly flaky but the screen should be able to play DivX, AVI and MKV video files. Taking the USB flash drive option seems more reliable.