Dyson reveals 360 Eye robot vacuum cleaner

Sucks harder than any other robot in history

Dyson has finally lifted the lid on its new robot vacuum cleaner. It's called the Dyson 360 Eye and it so-say sucks harder than any other autonomous hoover.

The 360 Eye uses a similar digital motor to the one found in some of Dyson's other products, and separates dust and debris using the company's cyclone technology.

Robot vacuum cleaners use cameras to track where they are in your home and learn your layout to ensure they clean every floor surface, and the Dyson 360 Eye is no different.

While some products track their location by looking at your ceilings, the Dyson uses a 360-degree panoramic camera to effectively see in every direction.

Dyson 360 Eye

It uses infrared, too, so it should be able to navigate even when your lights are off.

It gets about on tank tracks instead of wheels, and it'll happily stick to a schedule and clean when you're out of the house – you can control it using the included mobile app even if you're away on holiday.

"Most robotic vacuum cleaners don't see their environment, have little suction, and don't clean properly," says James Dyson.

"They are gimmicks. We've been developing a unique 360° vision system that lets our robot see where it is, where it has been, and where it is yet to clean. Vision, combined with our high speed digital motor and cyclone technology, is the key to achieving a high performing robot vacuum – a genuine labour saving device."

No word on pricing yet but you can bet it won't be cheap. And you'll have plenty of time to save up - it's not set to go on sale in Japan until Spring 2015 with other countries to follow after that.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Reviews Editor

James (Twitter, ) oversees the reviews we publish on the site and also edits the TV, AV, Gaming, Car Tech and Gadgets channels. He's been in the field for 13 years, and travels all over the world to attend tech shows, product launches and cult gatherings. James' opinions have been inflicted on audiences of BBC TV, Radio 5 Live, The Guardian, local radio and various magazines and he's a grizzled veteran of most tech shows but will never again to return to CeBIT (no means no).