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Best SSDs 2022: the top solid-state drives for your PC

PRICE
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
An SSD against a blue background next to the words "Best SSDs"
(Image credit: Future)

If you're looking for an easy and effective way to upgrade your PC - whether it's a laptop or a full desktop PC - the best SSDs are it. If you haven't made the move to an SSD from a hard drive, picking up any solid state drive will speed up every single thing you do on your PC. Plus, it'll make your PC more reliable, too.

That’s because SSDs are much more robust and less prone to failure than HDDs due to the fact that they don’t have any moving parts. They also offer faster read and write speeds, which makes them ideal for creative professionals who need speedy access to their files for a more seamless creative workflow.

If it sounds like an SSD is just the storage solution you need, take a look at our buying guide below. We found the best SSDs on the market, many of which we use and rely on ourselves on a daily basis. Take a look, and be sure to take a look at our included price comparison tool so you can also find the best SSD deals available.

Best SSD 2022

The top SSDs, thanks to that speed and reliability, are a boon for any professional or business that must have their most crucial data accessible at a moment’s notice. Anyone who regularly deals with larger files, such as video editors and content creators, will find that using an SSD will save quite a bit of time. On top of that, solid state drives have a smaller footprint than a typical hard drive so they’re easier to fit into a computer, no matter if it’s one of the best gaming PCs or an Ultrabook.

Whether you have one of the best PCs out there or a budget computer, you’ll benefit from the speed of one of these drives. So, take a look at our list of the best solid state drives to find the right one for you, no matter if you’re upgrading or adding one to your system, from the fastest M.2 SSDs to the best gaming SSDs.

Samsung 980 Pro against a white background

(Image credit: Samsung )

1. Samsung 980 Pro

Samsung throws its hat into the PCIe 4.0 ring

Specifications

Capacity: 250GB – 1TB
Interface: PCIe Gen 4.0 x 4, NVMe 1.3c
Warranty: Limited warranty up to 5 years or up to the TBW for each capacity

Reasons to buy

+
Extreme performance
+
Competitive price
+
Good endurance rating

Reasons to avoid

-
PCIe 3.0 users better off with cheaper drive

If you can afford to spare no expense in getting a storage drive, then the Samsung 980 Pro may just be the best SSD for you. This is the fastest SSD we've ever tested, making it ideal for future-proofing your rig – especially when you get the 1TB capacity. And, while it's not the cheapest SSD on the market, it delivers that speed without substantially raising the price over its rivals. Just remember that in order to take full advantage of its speed, a Gen4 SSD is vital.

Read the full review: Samsung 980 Pro

Samsung 970 Evo Plus against a white background

2. Samsung 970 Evo Plus

Pushing Samsung further

Specifications

Capacity: 250GB/500GB/1TB/2TB
Interface: PCIe Gen 3 x4 M.2
Warranty: 5-years

Reasons to buy

+
Cheap
+
Top-end performance

Reasons to avoid

-
Sequential write speeds slow under load

Samsung is no stranger to creating some of the best SSDs, so when it launched the Samsung 970 Evo Plus with higher speeds and new silicon, even we were surprised. The Samsung 970 Evo Plus is simply one of the fastest drives on the market, but the fact that Samsung is selling it at such a bargain price is just the icing on the cake. Because of how affordable this drive is, it’s not hard to recommend it as the best SSD for anyone. 

Read the full review: Samsung 970 Evo Plus

Corsair MP400 drive and retail packaging against a white background

(Image credit: Corsair)

3. Corsair MP400

Kiss those loading screens goodbye

Specifications

Capacity: 1TB/2TB/4TB/8TB
Interface: PCIe Gen 3 x4 M.2
Warranty: 5 years

Reasons to buy

+
Strong value
+
Speed and space 

Reasons to avoid

-
 Lower endurance 

The Corsair MP400 is a gem. With low prices even for SATA SSDs, the Corsair MP400 is offering a ton of storage so you get the most for your money. But, it’s not a SATA SSD. It’s a PCIe NVMe SSD and not a slow one at that. It’s competitive in speeds with many other PCIe 3.0 SSDs and undercuts them in price. It’s lower endurance is about the only drawback, but it’s not going to be a major concern for typical users who aren’t writing tons of data. 

Read the full review: Corsair MP400

Intel Optane 905P against a white background

(Image credit: Intel)

4. Intel Optane 905P

Ludicrously fast SSD

Specifications

Capacity: 1.5TB
Interface: 2.5in PCIe* x4
Warranty: 5 years

Reasons to buy

+
Fast random read/write speeds
+
LED lighting

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricey

The Optane SSD 905P is hardly a newcomer, but with a random read rated at 575,000 IOPS and random write rated at 555,000 IOPs, it’s definitely one of Intel’s fastest drives. Granted, its 2,600MB/s sequential read and 2,200MB/s sequential write speeds might seem a bit pedestrian, especially next to the Samsung 970 Evo and WD Black NVMe SSDs, that doesn’t stop it from being a fast solid-state drive, not to mention one of the best SSDs on the market.

SK Hynix Gold P31 retail packaging against a white background

(Image credit: SK Hynix)

5. SK Hynix Gold P31

The most flexible SSD install

Specifications

Capacity: 500GB/1TB
Interface: PCIe Gen 3 x4 M.2
Warranty: 5 years

Reasons to buy

+
Fantastic speeds
+
Fair value 

Reasons to avoid

-
PCIe 4.0 exists 

The SK Hynix Gold P31 is a fantastic drive, especially at its recently reduced price. It offers incredible speeds on the PCIe 3.0 interface, even coming close to some of the PCIe 4.0-based drives we’ve tested. But therein lies the only major drawback, much faster drives are now hitting the market. There are many cases where the P31 will be a great pick, but where there’s an empty PCIe 4.0 slot, it’ll make more sense to go with a faster drive. 

Read the full review: SK Hynix Gold P31

Samsung 980 against a white background

(Image credit: Samsung)

6. Samsung 980

An unexpected runner up

Specifications

Capacity: 250GB, 500GB, 1TB
Interface: PCIe Gen 3.0 x4, NVMe 1.4
Warranty: 5 Years or up to 600 TBW

Reasons to buy

+
Competitive price
+
Highly capable
+
Black PCB

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the fastest
-
Not the cheapest

Though only a PCIe 3.0 model and a far cry from Samsung’s 980 Pro, the Samsung 980 is a strong and highly-capable drive that gives you a pretty good price, especially for 1TB of storage. It delivers read and write speeds of up to 3,500 MB/s and up to 3,000 MB/s, and keeps things stealthy and classy with its all-black look. If you’re looking to fill a PCIe 4.0 slot, then you might want to look elsewhere. Otherwise, you’re getting good value in this drive.

Read the full review: Samsung 980

Silicon Power US70 against a white background

(Image credit: Silicon Power)

7. Silicon Power US70

Strong speed and storage blend

Specifications

Capacity: 1TB/2TB/4TB/8TB
Interface: PCIe Gen 4 x4 M.2
Warranty: 5 years

Reasons to buy

+
Well priced
+
Worthy speeds 

Reasons to avoid

-
Some competition 

The Silicon Power US70 brings the price of PCIe 4.0 SSDs down to a more easy-to-stomach level. It’s pleasantly fast for a value-oriented drive, and has serious endurance, but it has some competition that can undercut it in price while jumping ahead in speed. It doesn’t help that it’s also on a strange, blue PCB that won’t blend well with many motherboards.

Read the full review: Silicon Power US70

Samsung 860 Pro against a white background

8. Samsung 860 Pro

SATA 3 isn’t dead yet

Specifications

Capacity: 250GB/512GB/1TB/2TB/4TB
Interface: SATA 3
Warranty: 5-years

Reasons to buy

+
Available 4TB model
+
Increased security

Reasons to avoid

-
SATA 3 limits performance

People might not be going crazy about SATA 3 anymore, but the Samsung 860 Pro proves that there’s still plenty of life in the aging interface after all. With storage up to 4TB and transfer speeds that approach the theoretical maximum of the SATA 3 interface – not to mention top-of the-line reliability and security – the Samsung 860 Pro is among the best SSDs for anyone still clinging to SATA 3.

Read the full review: Samsung 860 Pro 

Corsair MP600 Pro LPX on a white background

(Image credit: Corsair)
Fast and cool

Specifications

Capacity: 500GB/1TB/2TB/4TB
Interface: PCIe Gen 4 x4 M.2
Warranty: 5 years

Reasons to buy

+
Super fast
+
Included cooler

Reasons to avoid

-
A tad pricey

The Corsair MP600 Pro LPX blazes out of the gate with some of the fastest performance we’ve seen from a consumer SSD. In sequential benchmarks, it blows out the Samsung 980 Pro and WD Black SN850. It’s not leading the crowd for random operations, but it’s not lagging far behind. The fact that this drive is delivering so much performance while maintaining a reasonable 16-cents-per-gigabyte value and even includes its own low-profile cooler that’s ready for PS5 just makes this drive that much harder to beat. The real kicker is that Corsair offers variants with bigger heatsinks that cost just a little bit less.

Read the full review: Corsair MP600 Pro LPX

Team T-Force Delta Max SSD

(Image credit: Team Group)

10. Team T-Force Delta Max

Stylish RGBs, SATA speed limits

Specifications

Capacity: 250GB/500GB/1TB
Interface: SATA III
Warranty: 3 years

Reasons to buy

+
Stylish design
+
Performant 

Reasons to avoid

-
Outclassed 

The T-Force Delta Max SSD from Team is about as stylish as a drive can get thanks to an RGB layer that can sync with a variety of motherboards. It’s actually on the fast side for a SATA SSD as too, and Team doesn’t charge too much for the gamer aesthetic. But, it’s no contest when put head-to-head with a PCIe SSD, which can now beat it in both speed and pricing. 

Michelle Rae Uy is a Los Angeles-based editor, writer and photographer with a bad case of wanderlust. She is a regular contributor for Thrillist, TravelAge West, HuffPo Travel, Paste Magazine, and Travel Pulse. She has written for publications like Nylon, Fodor's and SmarterTravel, and is also the contributing editor for MiniTime.com.