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Best hard drives 2022: the top HDD for desktops and laptops

PRICE
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
Seagate hard drive on green background
(Image credit: Future / Seagate)

You need one of the best hard drives if you constantly find yourself having to delete old files or transfer them onto flash drives or thumb drives to make room for new files. Instead of going through that hassle, consider upgrading to a larger hard drive that’s got all the storage capabilities you need - and maybe even a little more.

It’s true there are some faster and more reliable storage options out there, but hard drives remain the best in terms of value because they let you get a lot more for a lot less. Hard drives aren’t just a cheaper alternative to the best SSDs (solid state drives), they also give you more storage capacity for less.

HDDs (hard disk drives) are so cost effective that a 4TB HDD and a 1TB SSD end up costing the same price. Plus, if you’re running older hardware you may not be able to take advantage of the blazing fast read and write speeds of an SSD, so it makes sense to decide on a storage option with more space instead.

The best hard drives are reliable and capable of retrieving, saving, and protecting your important documents and projects, which makes them one of the best value storage options for your PC. Better still, you can upgrade your storage capacity without paying more than necessary.

Whether you’re looking for an external hard drive or an internal one to upgrade the best gaming PC, you’ll be able to find one in our top hard drive picks of 2022. We’ve even included a price comparison tool so you can get the best hard drive deal available. 

What’s the difference between a hard drive and an SSD?

 There are a few differences between a hard drive and an SSD, but it’s important to first note that they pretty much have the same job, they just function differently. Traditional hard drives have a circular disk (platter) that stores your data - as the disk spins, the read-write arm reads data on the disc or writes data to it as it spins. Solid state drives (SSDs) have no moving parts, instead using NAND (Negative-AND) flash memory - the more memory chips an SSD has, the more storage capacity.

Price-wise, you’ll typically find that hard drives are less expensive than SSDs and offer quite a bit more storage capacity for a lower price. However, SSDs tend to be a lot faster than even the best hard drives because they don’t have to rely on moving parts like HDDs. The best SSDs can function up to 10 times faster than traditional hard drives.

There’s a third option in the SSD vs HDD conversation as well - hybrid drives (SSHDs) offer the speed of an SSD and the capacity of a traditional HDD in a single drive. An option like this would be great if you don’t have space for multiple hard drives and want the best of both worlds. 


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Best hard drives at a glance

  1. Seagate BarraCuda
  2. Toshiba X300
  3. WD VelociRaptor
  4. WD Blue Desktop
  5. Seagate Firecuda Desktop
  6. Seagate IronWolf NAS
  7. Seagate FireCuda Mobile
  8. WD My Book
  9. G-Technology G-Drive

Best hard drive: Seagate BarraCuda

Seagate BarraCuda drives offer a great gigabyte-per-dollar ratio and speed benefits to top it off. (Image Credit: Seagate)

Best hard drive: Seagate BarraCuda

High RPM and storage at a low price

Specifications

Interface: SATA 6Gbps
Capacity: 2 – 3TB
Cache: 64MB
RPM: 7,200

Reasons to buy

+
Low cost
+
Fast spinning disks

Reasons to avoid

-
 Limited cache

It’s almost impossible to talk about hard drives without mentioning Seagate’s BarraCuda lineup – it’s a force to be reckoned with. And, it’s not hard to see why, Seagate BarraCuda drives offer a great gigabyte-per-dollar ratio and speed benefits to top it off. The 2TB model hits a sweet spot by balancing high performance and affordability. Since this drive combines 7,200rpm platters and high density data, computers outfitted with this drive will be able to read data extraordinarily fast.

Best high capacity hard drive: Toshiba X300

The Toshiba X300 is a high-capacity, high-performance champ worth taking a look at. (Image Credit: Toshiba)

Best high capacity hard drive: Toshiba X300

Big drives at nimble speeds

Specifications

Interface: SATA 6Gbps
Capacity: 4 – 8TB
Cache: 128MB
RPM: 7,200

Reasons to buy

+
Massive storage
+
High speeds

Reasons to avoid

-
Short warranty

Even if its laptops aren’t as popular as they used to be, Toshiba is still a huge name in computing, and has a lot to offer. When it comes to the best hard drives, the Toshiba X300 is a high-capacity, high-performance champ worth taking a look at. The X300 drives boast great gigabyte-to-dollar value without sacrificing on performance. These drives all spin at 7,200 rpm and include 128MB of cache for higher speeds. The only downside is the warranty only lasts two years, which feels short for a drive meant to store so much important data.

Best gaming hard drive: WD VelociRaptor

Kick it old school with one of the best hard drives with the WD VelociRaptor. (Image Credit: Western Digital)

Best gaming hard drive: WD VelociRaptor

Faster spinning, faster gaming

Specifications

Interface: SATA 6Gbps
Capacity: 250GB – 1TB
Cache: 64MB
RPM: 10,000

Reasons to buy

+
Insane HDD speed
+
Built-on cooler

Reasons to avoid

-
Priced like an SSD

When it comes to PC gaming, it’s better to be fast than capacious. So, if you’ve been resisting the allure of an SSD, and looking to kick it old school with one of the best hard drives, the WD VelociRaptor should be up your alley. Not only does this drive have a whopping 10,000 rpm spin speed, but you’re going to want to pay attention to it. With capacities up to 1TB, the VelociRaptor drives are ready to store large game libraries, and the super fast platters will help your games launch and load quickly.

  • This product is only available in the US and UK at the time of this writing. Australian readers: check out a fine alternative in the Seagate FireCuda 

Best budget hard drive: WD Blue Desktop

The WD Blue is a viable pick for almost any type of PC build that’s sticking to a budget. (Image Credit: Western Digital)

Best budget hard drive: WD Blue Desktop

Heavy on storage, light on price

Specifications

Interface: SATA 6Gbps
Capacity: 500GB – 6TB
Cache: 64MB
RPM: 5,400 – 7,200

Reasons to buy

+
An option for every budget
+
Faster option available

Reasons to avoid

-
Less value from smaller drives

Western Digital offers a solid bargain with its line of WD Blue hard drives. With a wide variety of storage options from a small 500GB to a capacious 6TB, the WD Blue is a viable pick for almost any type of PC build that’s sticking to a budget. The best value comes from the larger drives – they’ll give you much more storage per dollar spent. And, if you’re looking for a bit more speed, there are also 7,200rpm models available that don’t come with too much of a price hike. 

Best hybrid hard drive: Seagate Firecuda Desktop

The SeaGate FireCuda is the best hybrid hard drive on the market. (Image Credit: Seagate)

Best hybrid hard drive: Seagate Firecuda Desktop

Faster than a HDD, cheaper than an SSD

Specifications

Interface: SATA 6Gbps
Capacity: 1TB – 2TB + 8GB
Cache: 64 MB
RPM: 7,200

Reasons to buy

+
NAND-boosted performance
+
An already fast platter

Reasons to avoid

-
No competition

SSDs are incredibly popular, and it’s not hard to see why. But, if you need a lot of fast storage, and you don’t have a vault of cash, hybrid hard drives are a great option. The SeaGate FireCuda is the best hybrid hard drive on the market. It can fit up to 2TB of data, and then its 8GB of solid state cache storage learns which data you use most, so that you can access it quickly. That speed boost is even sweeter when you consider that this drive spins at 7,200rpm. With a 5-year warranty and an approachable price tag, it’s easy to see why this is one of the best hard drives you can buy today.

Best NAS hard drive: Seagate IronWolf NAS

Seagate IronWolf NAS drives come at a premium (Image Credit: Seagate)

Best NAS hard drive: Seagate IronWolf NAS

Storage-galore for the network

Specifications

Interface: SATA 6Gbps
Capacity: 6 – 12TB
Cache: 256MB
RPM: 7,200

Reasons to buy

+
Ready for RAID
+
Faster than smaller options

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricier than non-NAS drives

It’s a little unfortunate that the Seagate IronWolf NAS drives come at a premium, but they aren’t priced much more expensively than a standard hard drive at their capacity. However, their native NAS optimization makes that premium totally worth it. These drives are capable of running at a fast 7,200rpm spin rate 24/7 without having to worry about drive failure. Really, if you have one of the best NAS devices for your business or home, the Seagate IronWolf NAS really is your best bet. 

Best laptop hard drive: Seagate FireCuda Mobile

Seagate’s 2.5-inch FireCuda hybrid drive strikes a nice balance. (Image Credit: Seagate)

Best laptop hard drive: Seagate FireCuda Mobile

Adds more pep to a laptop than an HDD

Specifications

Interface: SATA 6Gbps
Capacity: 500GB – 2TB + 8GB
Cache: 64 MB
RPM: 5,400

Reasons to buy

+
Multiple capacity options
+
Performance above a standard HDD

Reasons to avoid

-
Flash storage comes at a premium

Upgrading the storage in a laptop can be tough, since the hard drives are much smaller. There aren’t a lot of impressive 2.5-inch hard drives, as anything fast comes with a serious markup, but Seagate’s 2.5-inch FireCuda hybrid drive strikes a nice balance. It offers an easy way to add loads of storage to a laptop while also giving it a speed boost thanks to 8GB of flash storage. A five-year warranty on the drive will also help ensure it lasts a long time.

Best game console hard drive: WD My Book

The WD My Book strikes an amazing balance of storage and price. (Image Credit: Western Digital)

Best game console hard drive: WD My Book

For when you need to fit all the games

Specifications

Interface: USB 3.0
Capacity: 3 – 20TB

Reasons to buy

+
Massive storage options
+
Simpler upgrade solution

Reasons to avoid

-
Potentially slower

Game consoles hard drives fill up fast with massive libraries. And, like laptops, the upgrade path for 2.5-inch hard drives isn’t all that great, but that’s where an external drive comes in. The WD My Book strikes an amazing balance of storage and price, offering enough room for massive game libraries. Running on USB 3.0, it may not be quite as fast as an internal drive upgrade, but it will run games and offer more storage at a cheaper rate.

Best external hard drive: G-Technology G-Drive

The G-Technology G-Drive offers huge amounts of storage but thanks to Thunderbolt 3 compatibility. (Image Credit: G-Technology)

Best external hard drive: G-Technology G-Drive

Life in spinning disks

Specifications

Interface: USB 3.1 (Type-C)
Capacity: 4 – 10TB

Reasons to buy

+
 Fantastic performance 
+
 USB Type-C V2 

Reasons to avoid

-
 Bigger than expected 

A lot of people seem to think that the best hard drives are ancient and dead technology. However, with devices like the G-Technology G-Drive, you can show the naysayers in your life that spinning disks have their own place in the future. Not only does this external hard drive offer huge amounts of storage – up to 10 TB – but thanks to Thunderbolt 3 compatibility, it can even charge your laptop while you work. If you have a MacBook Pro, it’s hard to think of a better work companion.

Read the full review: G-Technology G-Drive 

You might also want to check out the best PS5 external hard drives (opens in new tab).

Over the last several years, Mark has been tasked as a writer, an editor, and a manager, interacting with published content from all angles. He is intimately familiar with the editorial process from the inception of an article idea, through the iterative process, past publishing, and down the road into performance analysis.

With contributions from