Logitech Driving Force GT review

Does this GT branded steering wheel offer good value for money?

Logitech Driving Force GT
If you are looking for the pinnacle of steering wheel design, this isn't it

TechRadar Verdict

Pros

  • +

    Decent steering accuracy

  • +

    Extra buttons work well with Gran Turismo

  • +

    Decent force feedback

Cons

  • -

    Gear shift paddles

  • -

    Force feedback not the best

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Have you felt the sting of Sunday afternoon envy watching F1 drivers frolic in their hydraulic simulators like giddy children on priceless corporate bucking bronco rides? 'I could probably go quicker than that' you whisper through gritted teeth, 'if only my dad had spent all his money on karting licences instead of bourgeois nonsense like mortgages and food'.

But until Red Bull Racing spot you executing perfect doughnuts in Homebase car park and decide to offer you a racing contract, the closest you'll get to the pro race driver life is getting a decent force feedback steering wheel and loading up an unforgiving racing sim.

Logitech's Driving Force GT is such a wheel. Decent. It'll work on PC or PS3, and the Gran Turismo logo on the front hints it's better suited to the latter, where expectations are lower.

Right enough, there's convincing force feedback, but compared to the superlative G27 in Logitech's arsenal it hardly compares. Gear shifting is the Driving Force GT's real bogey, though. Lacking paddles, the wheel-mounted buttons feel stiff and unsatisfying and the flimsy stick offers little relief.

It's capable then, but at £100 it's not worth the money and dangerously close to the greatly superior G25, also in the Logitech camp. Consider only if you want cross-platform driving.

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Phil Iwaniuk
Contributor

Ad creative by day, wandering mystic of 90s gaming folklore by moonlight, freelance contributor Phil started writing about games during the late Byzantine Empire era. Since then he’s picked up bylines for The Guardian, Rolling Stone, IGN, USA Today, Eurogamer, PC Gamer, VG247, Edge, Gazetta Dello Sport, Computerbild, Rock Paper Shotgun, Official PlayStation Magazine, Official Xbox Magaine, CVG, Games Master, TrustedReviews, Green Man Gaming, and a few others but he doesn’t want to bore you with too many. Won a GMA once.