The best gaming TV in Australia 2023: TVs for PS5 and Xbox Series X

Best Gaming TVs in Australia
(Image credit: Future)

Contrary to popular belief, the best TVs overall aren’t always the best TVs for gaming, with the latest consoles boasting unique demands and needs. Sure, details like screen size, operating system and screen technology might still matter if you’re on the hunt for the perfect companion to your gaming console, but these alone won’t necessarily guarantee the highest possible quality your console deserves.

So what does it take for a home screen to be the best gaming TV?

Determining the right TV for your gaming demands brings in terms and features like Variable Refresh Rate (VRR), Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) and frame rates come into play. It's enough to make you dizzy trying to navigate what makes a TV the best fit for gaming, so we’ve gone ahead and put together a list of the best you can find right now for you to consider.

Below you’ll find home screen options from the likes of Samsung, Sony, LG and more, with each of them boasting features making them the best options on the market for pairing with your gaming console of choice.

Top gaming TVs

Best gaming TVs in Australia

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LG C2 OLED TV with colors on screen

(Image credit: LG)
The best gaming TV overall

Specifications

Available sizes: 42, 48, 55, 65, 77 and 83-inches
Input lag: 6ms
Refresh rate: 120Hz
VRR support: HDMI forum, FreeSync, G-Sync
HDMI ports (HDMI 2.1): 4 (4)

Reasons to buy

+
Beautiful overall picture quality
+
Dolby Vision gaming mode
+
Four HDMI 2.1 ports

Reasons to avoid

-
No HDR10+
-
Hefty price tag
-
42- and 48-inch experience slight quality differences

No surprise here, but the best TV overall also happens to the best TV option for gamers. That's if only with the caveat that the price for this one will set you back a pretty penny. Still, if you're wanting the best gaming TV and an overall powerhouse OLED screen, then the LG C2 is worth considering. 

The LG C2's 4K OLED display is an absolute marvel, delivering exquisite black levels, vibrant colours and a dynamic overall picture performance allowing its quality to maintain across every task you'll throw at it. The new Alpha a9 Gen 5 processor in 2022's update to the C2 models is the real MVP here, boosting object enhancement and dynamic tone mapping. Audio for the C2 out of the box is also excellent for a home screen, boasting ‘virtual surround sound’, with the TV also capable of upscaling stereo content into 7.1.2-channel sound.

As for where and how the C2 excels for gamers, the inclusions of FreeSync, G-Sync and standard VRR right out of the box are a solid start. And with native 120Hz refresh rate and HDMI 2.1, PS5 and Xbox Series X owners can be assured of getting the maximum resolution and frame rate for their prized consoles of choice. The new "Prevent Input Delay" setting is also a handy addition for gamers, although the C2's lack of HRD10+ is a slight disappointment.

It is also worth reinforcing that while this might be the best overall TV for gaming in our opinion, it might not necessarily be the best gaming TV for you, with a price tag that's more than a little bit higher than many of us can afford. If that sounds like you, there's every chance you might be better off considering some of the cheaper, but similarly excellent options below.

Read the full LG C2 review

TCL C835 with white background

(Image credit: TCL)
Best budget-friendly gaming TV

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 75-inch
Input lag: 6ms
Refresh rate: 120/144Hz (VRR)
ALLM: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Great image and brightness
+
Google TV and voice
+
Budget-friendly

Reasons to avoid

-
More cumbersome than competitors
-
Less overall power than top of the line models

TCL largely doesn't get the credit it deserves for its excellence in the area of overall value with its home entertainment selection, consistently excelling in balancing quality features and performance with budget-friendly prices in ways none of its competitors seem to match.

At a price point that's friendly to a lot of budgets, the TCL C835 is no exception to the above and offers a lot to like for the cost-conscious consumer looking to get the very best bang for their buck. Its use of Mini-LED backlighting is the best example of how little the C835 compromises despite its lower price, offering brightness to 1,500 nits that beats out OLED capabilities. It even manages to include HDR10+ as a very valuable point of difference to the C2 in this list above it.

The thousands of tiny LED lights in locally dimmable zones, ranging from grouping sizes starting at 240 in the 55-inch model and up to 360 in the 75-inch, also add considerable heft in the C835's ability to compete even at its low price point. As we wrote in our review: "[This] LED light excites a layer of quantum dots to deliver RGB colour with a claimed full 100% of the DCI-P3 space, greater even than the latest QD-OLED panels."

And what the C835 offers gamers at its price is just as excellent, with VRR support up to 120/144Hz, Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) and Clear Motion Rate (CMR) keeping input lag down to 6ms to provide smooth and lag-free onscreen visuals.

The build here is thicker than many other competitors, but overall the TCL C835 does a hell of a lot to stand out among all of 2022's new TVs. It lands in second spot here, but be assured that for a lot of budgets the TCL C835 is likely the very best option.

Read the full review: TCL 55C835 4K Mini LED TV

Samsung S95B OLED TV supplied shot with blue and green screen

(Image credit: Samsung)
The best QD-OLED for outstanding looks

Specifications

Available sizes: 55 and 65-inches
Input lag: >10ms
Refresh rate: 120Hz
VRR: HDMI forum, AMD FreeSync
HDMI ports (HDMI 2.1): 4 (4)

Reasons to buy

+
Incredible ultra-slim design
+
Ground-breaking picture quality

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision support
-
Unfriendly smart TV interface

Samsung's QD-OLED display combines the famous self-emissive properties of OLED with the brightness and colour range potential of QLED, which results in superb picture quality and exceptional brightness with better blacks and contrast. As we said in our review, "we're looking at a TV that has had the kitchen sink thrown at it, with Samsung's latest AI-inspired picture processor, a massively comprehensive and re-designed Tizen-based smart system, the latest gaming features, and even, despite the ultra-slim design, a clever object tracking sound audio system".

And for gamers there is no shortage of joys to be found. Four HDMI ports feature with the S95B, with each of them supporting 4K at 120Hz and including VRR and ALLM. Better yet, the primary source of power under the hood of this one in Samsung's Neural Quantum Processor utilises multiple neural networks to instantly analyse and optimise what you see on screen. So whether it's gaming, streaming or upscaling to 4K from HD sources, the S95B's NQP has you covered. 

The built-in sound system is also impressive for such a slim set, with Dolby Atmos and Samsung's Object Tracking tech for positional audio - something that will particularly appeal to PS5 gamers looking to get the best out of their console's 3D audio ambitions.

Still, much like the C2 at number one in this list, the price here is a bit beyond many budgets, but there's still no doubting the overall quality.

Read the full Samsung S95B OLED TV review

Hisense U8HAU on a white background

(Image credit: Hisense)
Budget light, feature heavy

Specifications

Available sizes: 55, 65, 75-inches
Input lag: 7.2 ms
Refresh rate: 120Hz
VRR support: FreeSync
ALLM: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Smooth, reliable picture quality
+
Full array of game-friendly support features
+
Attractive price point

Reasons to avoid

-
Some backlight blooming
-
Modest audio performance

The Australian edition of Hisense's U8H range, the U8HAU is very similar to the TCL C835 in this list above it with its offering strong performance quality and features at a budget-friendlier price point. Being a Mini-LED TV (also like the C835), it boasts brightness levels rivalling or surpassing even many OLED TVs, while also includes Quantum Dot technologies to elevate colours.

The Hisense U8HAU also includes local dimming zones to give it extra strength in delivering deep blacks and shadows, although suffers slightly for this during arduous picture tasks with some backlight blooming.

What the U8HAU offers for gamers at this price point is where it really excels, featuring Game Mode Pro via HDMI 2.1 for 4K@120Hz, VRR support via AMD FreeSync Premium and ALLM. It also boasts an ability to adapt picture quality up to HDR10+, something that not all the best options in this list can claim.

Audio performance may not be its best strengths though, with sound quality best described as average, so investing in one of the best soundbars may become necessary to get the best out of this Hisense screen.

Read the full Hisense U8H review (some features may differ between regions)

Sony A80K OLED TV

(Image credit: Sony)
A 'Perfect for PS5' OLED gaming TV with stunning picture quality

Specifications

Available sizes: 55, 65 and 77-inches
Input lag: 12ms
Refresh rate: 120Hz
VRR: HDMI forum
HDMI ports (HDMI 2.1): 4 (2)

Reasons to buy

+
Deep blacks and rich, accurate colors
+
Full HDMI 2.1 features, plus PS5 Tone Mapping
+
Less expensive than most other Sony OLEDs

Reasons to avoid

-
Not as bright as other high-end TVs
-
No HDR10+ support

This is Sony's mid-range OLED TV, meaning of course that it offers less advanced quality than higher-grade Sony OLEDs (such as the Sony A95K ). But its more approachable price point allows it to surpass these other Sony OLEDs for the purposes of this list, while matching their abilities to pair seamlessly with the PS5 particularly.

With 4K 120Hz and VRR support over two HDMI 2.1 ports and ALLM achieving input lag as low as 12ms when we tested it. And when paired with the PS5 particularly, the A80K adds Auto HDR Tone Mapping support, meaning that the PS5 will adjust its HDR output to match the exact capabilities of the screen and ensure you always get the best-looking image.

Yet the A80K's quality doesn't begin or end with its support for the PS5 and gaming overall, as we summarised in our review: "The Sony A80K offers all the best things you expect from an OLED TV". 

And while this is true, the A80K also does enough as a Sony product to elevate it above many of its OLED competitors, such as with the inclusion of Sony’s Acoustic Surface Audio+ tech. This tech works to literally vibrate the screen in order to make sound, while dual subwoofers mounted to the TV's bottom and Dolby Atmos decoding with 3D surround upscaling also elevate the audio to make the purchase of an additional soundbar totally unnecessary for most consumers.

Its brightness fails to match that of others above it in this list, and doesn't include HDR10+, but does offer an infinite contrast ratio. This especially comes into play with its ability to display 'true blacks', measuring at an exceptional 0 nits when it was supposed to show blackness during our testing. That's a significant boost for picture quality overall, and if you've got a PS5 in particular the Sony A80K is an excellent choice.

Read the full Sony A80K review

LG G2 OLED TV on white background

(Image credit: LG)
LG's display-first OLED offers surprise gaming support

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch, 83-inch
Input lag: 5.3 ms
Refresh rate: 120 Hz
VRR: FreeSync, G-Sync
ALLM: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Gorgeously bright, vibrant pictures
+
Beautiful premium design

Reasons to avoid

-
Optional stand costs extra
-
No HDR10+ support

If price isn't a concern for you and you want one of the top quality OLED TVs with a decor-friendly design –  you want the LG G2 OLED. The LG G2 offers superior brightness to many of its OLED competitors which ultimately corresponds to more vibrant, dynamic colours and picture range.

For gamers, all four of the G2's HDMI ports are capable of handling the maximum 48Gbps of data supported by the HDMI 2.1 standard, meaning hardcore video gamers could simultaneously attach an Xbox Series XPS5 and cutting-edge PC graphics rig to enjoy full-fat 4K at 120Hz, variable refresh rates and automatic low latency mode switching from all of them. That, plus you'll still have one HDMI left for adding the less demanding Nintendo Switch into the mix.

Like any home screen option, however, the LG G2 won't be for everybody. It comes with a hefty price tag attached, fails to offer HDR10+ and its frame is designed to be hung on a wall. That means there's no stand here, so you'll either need to buy one separately or hang this one on the wall and figure out a way to make the cords of your consoles link up without making your living room look like an obstacle course.

The quality of the LG G2 is certainly not in question, and that includes what it offers for gamers particularly. But the G2 falls a few rungs down on this list due to the downsides mentioned above, each of which could be no issue at all for many people on the hunt for a new home screen.

Read the full LG G2 OLED TV review

Sony X90K

(Image credit: Sony)
More Sony quality and overall value for PS5 owners

Specifications

Available sizes: 55, 65, 75, 85-inches
Input lag: 18ms
Refresh rate: 120 Hz
VRR: Yes
HDMI ports (HDMI 2.1): 4

Reasons to buy

+
Deep blacks and good brightness
+
Strong suite of HDMI 2.1 gaming features
+
Great value

Reasons to avoid

-
Light output doesn’t match mini-LED TVs
-
Picture fade at far off-center seats
-
Overly basic remote lacks backlighting

The Sony X90K is an excellent value TV, offering high quality performance for its price point. It has a full-array LED backlight, which features local dimming, resulting in deeper blacks. Paired with the LCD panel’s quantum dots, colours also find themselves with a handy boost, on top of brightness that may not match the very best but remains solid regardless.

And the X90K arguably shines brightest as a gaming TV, especially for PS5 owners. The X90 has a fantastic suite of gaming features, including 4K/120Hz video support (available only on two of the set’s four HDMI inputs), variable refresh rates (VRR) and auto low latency mode (ALLM). Input lag as measured by our 4K test meter was also 13.8ms, a very good result though not quite matching some of the other options included above it here.

X90K TVs are also a part of Sony's Perfect for PlayStation 5 screen range, offering Auto HDR Tone Mapping and Auto Genre Picture Mode when paired with the PS5 to fully optimise the screen's image for gaming.

This is a great gaming TV, especially for the price, and might even be worth a few spots above where it lands on this list if it were to land a discount on top. So by all means keep your eyes peeled.

Read more: Sony XR X90K review

Samsung Q80B TV

(Image credit: Samsung)
The best mid-range Samsung gaming TV with four HDMI 2.1 ports

Specifications

Available sizes: 50, 55, 65, 75 and 85-inches
Input lag: 10.2ms
Refresh rate: 120 Hz
VRR: FreeSync Premium Pro, Variable Refresh Rate (VRR)
HDMI ports (HDMI 2.1): 4 (4)

Reasons to buy

+
Wide colour and superb picture detail
+
4k 120Hz HDMI support

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision
-
Backlight blooming

The Samsung Q80B is a high value mid range 4K QLED screen that we consider to be a fantastic all-rounder given it offers just as much for everyday TV needs as it does for the gamers.

With four HFR (high frame rate) compatible HDMI inputs and a useful Game Bar user interface, the Q80B's value to gamers is obvious from the outset. If the prominence of Samsung’s Game Hub is any indication, acting as a full page portal to streaming games services, gaming was at least partly front of mind for Samsung with the Q80B. QLED as a screen technology is impervious to screen burn, which translates nicely to gaming sessions, while the Q80B's four HDMIs all support 4K 120Hz playback. 

There’s also ALLM (Auto Low Latency Mode) and Nvidia G-Sync and FreeSync Premium Pro support for variable refresh rates.

The set also has an above average Dolby Atmos compatible sound system. In our Samsung Q80B review we wrote: "Picture quality, particularly if you’re a bright room viewer, is impressive, and audio is immersive enough to stave off any additional soundbar purchase, at least until funds allow."

The Q80B at full price isn't necessarily the strongest option, nor represent the best value, but is nonetheless a very worthy competitor.

Read more: Samsung Q80B review

Best gaming TVs: FAQs

What makes a quality gaming TV?

If you’re seeing terms like Variable Refresh Rates, Auto Low Latency Mode and HDMI 2.1, you’d be forgiven for wondering just what it all means. So to help you better understand what it is and why it matters when selecting a gaming TV, we’ve defined the relevant terms for you below:

Frames per second (FPS):
Video as a technology works through the capture and display of still images at various rates per second, with frame rates, or FPS, a measure of how many times the image is updated each second on screen. As a general rule, the greater the FPS, the smoother a game will play. But not every TV is able to match the FPS your console or PC may be able to generate, making understanding them particularly important when it comes to gaming. It is also important to note that frame rates are not the same as refresh rates, which we’ll explore below.

Variable Refresh Rate (VRR):
Before the days of variable refresh rates, games were usually locked at a maximum of 60Hz - or the equivalent of 60 FPS. That not only hindered the performance capabilities of your gaming machine, which may well be powerful enough to reach much frame rates than 60, but it also meant the image itself might occasionally show glitches known as ‘tearing’ as the console and TV struggled to sync the signal.

VRR came first to the PC, where it’s known as G-Sync (Nvidia’s tech), or Adaptive Sync (an open standard which AMD also brands as ‘FreeSync). It allows the output of the console - which can vary immensely, often dipping down to below 60 FPS, and as high as a few hundred FPS - to be matched exactly by the TV. So - every single frame your console generates is displayed at that same moment on your TV, instead of being forced into 60 FPS on the TV, which results in the aforementioned glitching.

If your TV has VRR, it may well be marketed as AdaptiveSync, FreeSync, or even G-Sync. If you have any of these you’re good to go, and just need to make sure this feature is enabled on your TV’s menu (usually in Game Mode).

The end result is gaming that’s buttery smooth even during fast-paced movement, free of graphical glitches, and is much less likely to induce motion sickness.

Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM):
The moment you press a button on your pad, or turn the wheel of your sim car, or make any input - that signal has to travel from the controller to the TV, be processed by the TV, and translated to a response on-screen. That delay (which we call lag, or latency) is tiny - a few dozen milliseconds at most - but it’s enough to sometimes make you feel an odd disconnect with the game and what you’re doing. 

ALLM solves that by automatically switching to a low-latency mode when gaming where the lag is reduced to an absolute minimum, making you feel more in control, and the gaming experience more natural.

The fancy name obscures what is actually just a feature indicating that your TV has the ability to recognise when it’s being asked to pair up with a gaming console and adapt its output to the demands of gaming and ensure best possible performance.

High Dynamic Range (HDR):
Believe it or not, there is a whole new world of colours and colour variations beyond the colours of the rainbow, with variations of white (light) and black (darkness) being relevant to video content including video games. HDR is simply an indication that a TV boasts the ability to display a wider range of colours and shades, allowing it to display your games at their best through clearer, more dynamic colours and brightnesses as well as deeper shadows.

The two most common HDR formats are either HDR10 or HDR10+, with HDR10+ considered to be the superior of the two as its name would suggest.

If your game supports HDR, and it will need to, then your HDR-capable TV will look absolutely gorgeous, with sunlight so bright you almost feel your eyes burn, and colours so rich and beautiful the game world becomes stunningly real.

HDMI 2.1:
HDMI is simply the designation for the connection technology responsible for transmitting from Point A (your console) to Point B (your TV), with this HDMI technology offering superior integration with VRR, ALLM and the frame rate demands of your favourite video games.

2.1 is the very latest HDMI standard, and it allows higher resolutions at higher frame rates, with HDMI 2.1 able to display a 4K picture at over 60Hz. HDMI 2.1 is a very new standard, and it’s only starting to appear on devices now. Much more common is the older HDMI 1.4a standard, which limits 4K gaming to just 30Hz (or FPS). So, getting a TV for gaming with HDMI 2.1 is an absolute must. Note you will need an HDMI 2.1 compatible cable for the magic to happen, and your console or PC must also be able to output a HDMI 2.1 signal.

Do I need an 8K gaming TV?

On paper, 8K sounds pretty good, and with the power of the latest games consoles surely they must demand the latest resolution technology, right? Not quite. While the PS5 and Xbox Series X do have compatibility support with 8K and the power to output 8K content built-in, neither demand this resolution. In fact, game developers themselves generally aren’t working with 8K resolution in mind.

By all means, in 3-4 years time we could be seeing games demanding 8K, but it’s very much a non-essential right now that you’d be paying more for unnecessarily.

How we test

How we test the best gaming TVs

Read the specs and marketing claims of TV makers and they often over promise on what the TV can really do. That's why we've extensively tested all of the best gaming TVs in this list to ensure they work well and deliver on their next-gen gaming specs.

What that means is we'll publish the official specs from the TV manufacturer, like the input lag or refresh rates on offer, then tell you ourselves whether the TV lived up to them in practice. 

To do this, we tend to review TVs with a range of different content. Of course, next-gen gaming takes priority in this guide, but we imagine you'll also want to know what movies and TV shows are like to watch as well. 

That means as well as testing for all of the key specs you need in a gaming TV, like refresh rates and HDMI connections, we're also looking for good picture quality, vibrant colours and viewing angles to suit all kinds of rooms.

Sound is less of a priority with most gaming TVs as you'll get the best experience from gaming headphones or a soundbar, but it's always good to know you'll get a decent built-in experience. Which is why we've also detailed what it was like to listen to these TVs without additional devices, too.

As we've reviewed many TVs over the years – and many of the best gaming TVs – all of our testing isn't done in isolation, but takes into account the performance and specs of every TV that's come before it.

You can read about how we test, review and rate any product on TechRadar if you'd like to know more.

James Cutler
Staff Writer

James is a senior journalist with the TechRadar Australia team, particularly focused on news, analysis and reviews in the worlds of tech and the web, as well as a keen focus on smartphones, TVs and home entertainment, AR/VR, gaming and digital behaviour trends. He has worked for over six years in broadcast, digital and print journalism in Australia and also spent time as a nationally recognised academic specialising in social and digital behaviour trends. In his spare time, he can typically be found bouncing between one of a number of gaming platforms or watching anything horror.

With contributions from