PSA: Aussie iTunes gift cards are 15% off at Officeworks and Aus Post shops

(Image credit: Apple)
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Gift cards are a great shortcut when you're looking to buy a pressie for that hard-to-shop-for friend of relative. However, with both iTunes and Google Play gift cards going cheap in Australia at least a few times a year, they also offer a good way for savvy smartphone owners to save some cash when purchasing apps and games.

And if you're an iPhone or iPad owner, now's your chance to stock up, with two major Aussie retailers offering 15% off select iTunes cards.

App Store & iTunes gift cards come in $20, $30, $50 and $100 values, and you typically have to pay the full amount for one of those. Right now, however, both Australia Post (opens in new tab) and Officeworks (opens in new tab) have slashed prices on the $30 and $50 cards by 15% – meaning you'll be paying only $25.50 and $42.50 for them respectively.

Currently neither AusPost or Officeworks have specified an end date for this offer, so if you're in the market for iTunes credit we'd get in sooner rather than later.

$30/$50 iTunes Gift Card | from $25.50 at Officeworks (opens in new tab)

$30/$50 iTunes Gift Card | from $25.50 at Officeworks (opens in new tab)
$30 will get you plenty from Apple, be it apps, games, music or movies. And $50 will get you plenty more. Alternatively, these make the perfect no-brainer gift for an iOS-device owning friend or rello. Don't spend full price on these – head to Officeworks and save 15%.

$30/$50 iTunes Gift Card | from $25.50 at Aus Post Shop (opens in new tab)

$30/$50 iTunes Gift Card | from $25.50 at Aus Post Shop (opens in new tab)

Officeworks isn't the only retailer discounting the gift cards. You can even pop in to your local Australia Post Shop or visit the AusPost website and get yourself one (or more) of the $30 or $50 iTunes cards, with the same 15% shaved off the regular price.

Sharmishta Sarkar
Managing Editor (APAC)

Sharmishta is TechRadar's APAC Managing Editor and loves all things photography, something she discovered while chasing monkeys in the wilds of India (yes, she studied to be a primatologist but has since left monkey business behind). While she's happiest with a camera in her hand, she's also an avid reader and has become a passionate proponent of ereaders, having appeared on Singaporean radio to talk about the convenience of these underrated devices. When she's not testing cameras and lenses, she's discovering the joys and foibles of smart home gizmos. She also contributes to Digital Camera World and T3, and helps produce two of Future's photography print magazines in Australia.