The best treadmill 2024: The best running machine for every fitness level

Treadmill on a yellow background
(Image credit: Future)
Best treadmills: Quick menu

Running is an excellent way to keep fit, and having one of the best treadmills in your home means you can work out whenever suits your schedule.

While running outdoors is certainly great in the summer, the best treadmills keep you from having your cardio schedule dictated by the weather. And, since they’re right there in your house, there’s no gym commute or changing rooms to worry about. Simply hop on the treadmill, burn some calories, and be done whenever you feel like it.

The best treadmills let you take back your fitness, but there are plenty to choose from with their own unique attributes. Peloton, for example, offers a wealth of on-demand and live classes to give you motivation, while other options include a TV to take your mind off all of the sweating you’re doing. Others are more basic, focused on reducing the friction between you and hitting the belt.

Whichever your need, you’ll find a recommendation from us to suit you on this very page. Are you looking to track your cardio progress? Check out our best running watch buying guide. More interested in saving even more space? We have a list of the best under-desk treadmills, too. 

The quick list

Do you want to quickly find the best treadmill for you? Take a look at this at-a-glance overview, which picks out the most important features of each treadmill, so you can quickly narrow down your options, then jump down the page for a more detailed look.

The best treadmills for 2023

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The best treadmill overall

NordicTrack Commercial 2950 treadmill

(Image credit: NordicTrack)
The best treadmill overall

Specifications

Dimensions: 201” x 99” x 170”
Weight: 335lbs
Tread belt size: 22” x 60”
Max user weight: 300lbs
Display size and type: 22” HD touchscreen
Speed: 0-13.6mph
Incline: -6-15%
Other features: Bluetooth connectivity, dual 3” speakers, two AutoBreeze fans, Runners Flex cushioning, 30-day iFit Family membership, free wireless heart rate strap

Reasons to buy

+
Sturdy and well-designed machine
+
Vast incline and decline range
+
Powerful motor
+
User-friendly touchscreen

Reasons to avoid

-
Bulky
-
Expensive
-
Need an iFit Live subscription for content

The NordicTrack 2950 is a top of the range treadmill with an excellent design and vast range of features to keep both newbies and dedicated runners happy. Yes, it’s big but if you’ve got the space you won’t regret investing in this gym-quality running machine.

If you’re a fan of interval training you’ll love the, frankly awesome, -6 to 14% incline and decline range, powered seamlessly by the meaty and quiet 4.25HCP motor. The NordicTrack 2950 also has some serious shock absorbers (Runners Flex cushioning) making it nice and springy to run on, so it’s joint-friendly.

The 22” HD touchscreen is one of the biggest pulls, with its crisp graphics, intuitive controls and the awesome online content via the iFit app (you get a 30 days free trial with your purchase). Similar to Peloton classes, these workouts are energetic, informative and fun, and you’ll never run out of ones to try, with over 16,000 on-demand sessions in their library. If you don’t want an iFit subscription when your trial runs out, there are 40 pre-programs on the machine, too.

This has everything you want from a high-end treadmill and more. If you’ve got the space and budget, the NordicTrack 2950 might just be the best treadmill on the market right now.

View our full NordicTrack Commercial 2950 review

The best budget treadmill

Proform Premier 900 treadmill

(Image credit: ProForm)
The best budget treadmill

Specifications

Dimensions: 64” x 73.5” x 35”
Weight: 194lbs
Tread belt size: 20” x 55”
Max user weight: 324lbs
Display size and type: 7” color touchscreen
Speed: 0-12mph
Incline: -3-12%
Other features: Bluetooth, wireless heart rate monitoring, speakers, foldable, iFit app compatibility, and multi-speed fan

Reasons to buy

+
Meaty motor
+
Foldable
+
Good value

Reasons to avoid

-
No USB charger
-
Average belt size
-
Short arm rails

If you’re after a great value and budget-friendly treadmill with all the basics, the ProForm 900 is a solid choice. It comes with a small color 7” touchscreen, 2-speed fan to keep you cool, and quiet but powerful motor, which makes for a smooth transition between the extensive -3% to 12% incline range.

This is where this treadmill comes into its own – if you’re a fan of interval training and hill climbs you’re going to love this machine. With such a high incline you can almost use the ProForm 900 like a Stairmaster, walking briskly to work your quads, glutes and hamstrings.

ProForm works with the iFit for its virtual classes, and this app is bursting with amazing live and on-demand workouts and challenges to try (subscription needed). While the ProForm has a standard belt size (55” x 20”), taller people – anyone over 6ft 2 – might prefer a longer tread to really get into their natural stride. And the lack of USB charger is an oversight given how glued we all are to our devices these days. But for the price and design, this is an impressive treadmill that will suit runners of all abilities.

View our full ProForm Premier 900 review

The best premium treadmill

Peloton Tread treadmill

(Image credit: Peloton)
The best premium treadmill

Specifications

Dimensions: 68” x 33” x 61”
Weight: 291lbs
Tread belt size: 59” x 19”
Max user weight: 300lbs
Display size and type: 23.8” 1080p HD touchscreen
Speed: 0-12.5mph
Incline: 0-12.5%
Other features: Bluetooth 5.0 connectivity, Tread lock, 16GB internal flash storage, front stereo speakers, 2.2 channel with rear woofers, USB-C charging point, 3.5mm headphone jack.

Reasons to buy

+
Well designed
+
Extensive virtual classes
+
HD touchscreen

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive
-
No decline or fan
-
Not foldable

The Peloton Tread is a feature-rich, high tech treadmill that keeps runners motivated with its extensive library of live and on-demand workouts. It comes with a high price tag, but don’t be fooled into thinking you are paying for style over substance. Not only is this a sexy looking machine, it’s a well thought out and meticulously designed treadmill that is intuitive and easy to use.

Work your way through guided runs, strength training, yoga, HIIT and stretching via the Peloton app ($39 a month for membership) or try a scenic walk, run or hike.

One of the biggest highlights of the Tread is its minimalist design and crisp touchscreen, which is essentially your control center. Nearly all of the buttons are hidden within the display, and you can also adjust the incline and speed via your left and right handrail respectively.

The Peloton Tread is also really quiet, and has a well cushioned belt that feels springy and easy to run on. If you’ve got the budget, this treadmill is a great machine to help you achieve  your health and fitness goals by motivating you to train harder and faster. 

View our full Peloton Tread review

The best treadmill for beginners

Echelon Stride

(Image credit: Echelon)
Best for beginners

Specifications

Dimensions: 69.3” x 31” x 10.25”
Weight: 154lbs
Tread belt size: 55” x 20”
Max user weight: 300lbs
Display size and type: No inbuilt screen
Speed: 0.5-12mph
Incline: 10%
Other features: Bluetooth, auto-folding mechanism, two water bottle holders, USB port, tablet holder, pulse monitors, 8 preset workouts, iFit compatible.

Reasons to buy

+
Minimalist design
+
Foldable
+
App connectivity 

Reasons to avoid

-
Weak 1.75HP motor
-
Shorter running belt
-
No inbuilt screen

The Echelon Stride is ideal for technophobes with its minimalist design and simple interface. You can easily change the incline on the left handrail, while the right adjusts your speed. It’s also portable and has an auto-folding mechanism, making it easy to stow away when not in use.

It’s a great choice for people who like walking on a high incline, or a lengthy jog, but because of the slightly weak 1.75HP motor and speed limit of 12mph, more experienced runners might find this treadmill a little limiting.

The Echelon Stride is very comfortable to walk or run on, but particularly heavy or tall people might find it a tight squeeze as the handrails aren’t that wide, and the deck isn’t overly long at 55 inches (most competitors in the same price bracket are 60”). This won’t be an issue for most users, however. For virtual classes taught by enthusiastic instructors, you’ll need to sign up for the Echelon Fit app (subscription required) but you can use it as a standalone treadmill if you don’t want the extra cost.

View our full Echelon Stride review

How to choose the best treadmills

Image of man running on treadmill

(Image credit: Getty Images)

It can be tough to know where to start when buying the best treadmill for you, but there are certainly some things to keep in mind to help you narrow the options down.

For one, budget is important – there are all kinds of treadmills out there, but many of the most expensive ones are likely to have features you may never use. Another key consideration is space – will the treadmill sit in your home or garage, and will it need to be foldable? If you live in close proximity to someone, you should also consider how loud the treadmill will be while in use.

As a rule of thumb, you’ll want to find a treadmill with a motor horsepower of 1.5 at least, but up to 2.5 to 3.0 if you train regularly. If you’re running, look for a tread belt that’s 48 inches by 18 inches in length, but be prepared to go to 52 inches by 54 inches if you’re over 6ft to account for stride length.

If you don’t need a screen built into your treadmill, consider going without one - this can make a sizeable difference in price. If you think you’ll use online sessions or require the distraction, though, you may find the pros outweigh the cons.

How we test the best treadmills

We put treadmills through their paces by using them at various different speeds, rating the amount of features and the construction of the treadmill against the price to determine the best value for money. If the machine has classes on offer, we try the classes to get a better idea of the overall experience. Finally, we look at how easy it is to use, and what metrics and information we’re able to glean from our workouts. 

Latest updates

  • 02/01/2024: Changed the format of this buying guide
Matt Evans
Fitness, Wellness, and Wearables Editor

Matt is TechRadar's expert on all things fitness, wellness and wearable tech. A former staffer at Men's Health, he holds a Master's Degree in journalism from Cardiff and has written for brands like Runner's World, Women's Health, Men's Fitness, LiveScience and Fit&Well on everything fitness tech, exercise, nutrition and mental wellbeing.


Matt's a keen runner, ex-kickboxer, not averse to the odd yoga flow, and insists everyone should stretch every morning. When he’s not training or writing about health and fitness, he can be found reading doorstop-thick fantasy books with lots of fictional maps in them.