Motorola Defy review: Camera

The camera shoots stills at five megapixels and there's a small LED flash.

The autofocus kicks in after you've pressed the on-screen shutter button, so you'll need to hold the camera steady after you think you've actually taken a photo. If you move about a bit, you'll get blurred photos.

The range of effects is a bit basic, though you do get red, green and blue tinting along with the black and white, negative, sepia and solarise standards.

As you flick through these settings, you get a preview with your photo in a small window on-screen, so you can see how they will affect your shot, which is a neat touch.

You can set a Quick Upload option, which is basically a default upload location. This then appears as an option when you view photos in the Gallery, so you can send an image off immediately.

It isn't that quick, to be honest, because you can't use it from the camera app itself. In the Gallery, you've also got the usual Android share option of course, which you can use to email photos or share them in other ways (such as to Twitter, Facebook or by Bluetooth).

Motorola defy

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There's a lack of detailing in the distance, but the foreground detailing is reasonably good. Note, though, that the camera can't cope with the variance between light sky and dark foreground.

Motorola defy

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Plenty of ambient light and no extremes of light and shade means this is merely a passable photo. The lack of detailing on the foreground leaf shows the camera's limitations.

Motorola defy

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This photo was shot on a fairly dull day, but with nothing in the foreground, the camera really struggled to decide what the photo's subject was meant to be. The result is a lack of quality all round.