Anonymous has hit out again over allegations that it was part of the Sony hack, deciding to distance itself from a Financial Times article which lays the blame solely on the hacking network.

Entitled 'Sony, I Am Disappoint', Anonymous says that it is unhappy with the "false assumptions" the article makes and believes that only after Sony's reports on the hack are made public can anybody know who is really behind the attack.

Late last week, Sony did look like they were pinning the blame on Anonymous, stating that a file on its servers implicated the group.

We just don't know

"Until the forensics reports are released we don't know which exploit was used," said the statement.

"The forensic investigators need to conclude their work, and speculation in articles, blogs and comments brings the factual results no closer."

Anonymous does hint that it feels the constant finger pointing of who hacked Sony is distracting people from the fact that Sony's credit card billing system is flawed.

"A decent credit card transaction gateway includes recurring billing as an option," said Anonymous.

"Data mining by corporations has a profit motive, but as Sony has demonstrated it can be a massive liability.

"Why not start a discussion about corporate responsibility to protect user information, especially since they didn't need it to begin with?

"When the dust settles Sony may have more to fear from a massive class action lawsuit by their user base than the brief actions of the Global Hacker Nerd Brigade, Anonymous... Let THE GAMEs begin."