The best VR movies: experience the next era of storytelling

best VR movies

Virtual reality (VR) is on the rise, and while apps and games get a ton of press, there are plenty of VR movies to enjoy, too.

TechRadar's VR Month

TechRadar and PC Gamer are diving deep into virtual reality this month with a series of guides, how-tos, and features digging into every aspect of VR that we're simply calling VR Month. It's all being made possible by Oculus, which stepped up to support this month-long project. Thanks, Oculus!

VR movies are amazing for a number of reasons.

For starters, they’re much more immersive than their non-VR counterparts – thanks, of course, to the fact that you can watch many of them in 360 degrees.

That can make them much more interesting – plus, you’re likely to see something new every time you watch, thanks to the fact that you can look all around you while watching.

But, not all VR movies are really worth watching.

After all, many of them are underdeveloped, and even those with backing may suffer from poor storytelling or other issues. 

There’s also the fact that there really aren’t any full-length feature films in VR – so you’ll be limited to watching short films. 

Regardless, here are the best VR movies today.

Invasion

Looking for a fun experience that kids can enjoy just as much as adults? Invasion is an Emmy award-winning short film filled with color. It’s about two aliens with dreams of taking over the world, but, when they get here, they’re greeted by two adorable little bunnies. Narrated by Ethan Hawke and featuring beautiful visuals and well-designed animation, Invasion is a short film any VR-lover can enjoy. 

Ashes to Ashes

Ashes to Ashes may be a little more adult than Invasion, but it’s still definitely worth checking out. The film tells the story of a dysfunctional family as they struggle through the loss of a grandfather, whose last wish was to have his ashes blown up. In the film, you’ll take the perspective of the urn, which allows you to passively observe the story as it takes place around you. The film also exposes the behind-the-scenes process, by showing the crew filming the movie, and even showing the actors out of character at times.

It: Float

This one is for the horror fans out there. The modern retelling of Stephen King’s It was one of the biggest horror movies ever made and, in celebration of the film, a VR experience was also released. The VR film brings the viewer to the clown Pennywise’s abode, with newly horrifying details around every turn. Safe to say, this one isn’t for the faint of heart or young kids – but if you were a big fan of It, then it’s definitely one to check out.

The Conjuring 2 – Enfield 360 Experience

Here’s another one for the horror fans. This VR experience was made to promote the release of The Conjuring 2, and in it you’ll enter the Hodgson’s house and experience the terror of the Enfield Haunting for yourself. At the start of the film, you’ll be briefly greeted by director James Wan, after which you’ll head into the home. Short after, the lights begin to flicker on and off, objects on the wall spin around and more. You’ll quickly find that you’re an unwelcome guest in the home. As with the previous movie, it’s safe to say this isn’t a film for those who get scared easily. 

The Invisible Man

The Invisible Man follows more of a story than many of the other VR films on this list. In the film, you’ll observe low-level drug traffickers Nick and Kid, who secretly have a stash of high-value drugs hidden in a barn. Unfortunately for them, they also owe a debt to Frank, who suddenly shows up to their hideout – and insists that they settle the score with a game of Russian Roulette. It’s a slightly scary film, but all of the questions you have should be answered by the end – so it’s worth watching the whole thing.

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