Our Verdict

The X-T2 is one of our favourite cameras at the moment, and with the X-T20 Fuji has managed to distill many of these key features into a slightly more compact and affordable camera that's likely to hit the sweet spot for many photographers.

For

  • Rich and detailed images
  • Tactile controls
  • Excellent handling
  • Advanced AF system
  • Film simulation modes

Against

  • Limited touchscreen control
  • EVF magnification
  • Battery life could be better

Just as when it followed up the X-T1 with the X-T10, Fuji has taken a lot of the good stuff from the X-T2 and packaged it in a lighter, more affordable body to give us the X-T20.

Rather than leaving a 16-month gap between launching the two cameras as it did with the X-T1 and X-T10 though, Fuji has hardly missed a beat, announcing the X-T20 just over four months after the X-T2.

So should X-T2 owners now be kicking themselves over their purchase, or are there enough differences to separate the two?

Features

  • APS-C X-Trans CMOS III sensor, 24.3MP
  • 3.0-inch tilt-angle touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots
  • 4K video capture

Just as we’ve seen with the X-Pro2 and X-T2, the X-T20 incorporates Fujifilm’s latest 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III APS-C sensor. It delivers a significant boost in resolution from the X-T10’s 16.3MP sensor, and brings the new camera in line with pretty much most of its competitors.

The ISO range gets a boost  as well, with a native sensitivity range of ISO200-12,800, compared to ISO200-6,400 on the X-T10, and while the expanded range stretches to the same sensitivity limits of ISO100-51,200, there’s some welcome news here too – unlike on the X-T10, where the expanded range was restricted to JPEG-only files, the X-T20 allows you to shoot raws as well JPEGs at this expanded range.

The X-T20 sticks with the same 2.36 million-dot OLED electronic viewfinder as we saw on the X-T10. Interestingly, while the resolution matches that of the EVF used in the X-T2, the magnification isn’t quite as impressive, at 0.62x compared to 0.77x, and not quite a match for the Lumix G80/G85’s 0.74x magnification. 

While the X-T2 did away with a touchscreen interface at the rear – at the time Fuji believed, after feedback from users, that there wasn’t a demand for it – it seems to have had a bit of a change of heart for the X-T20.

The X-T20’s 3.0-inch touchscreen doesn’t quite offer the same breadth of control as, say, the one on the Canon EOS M5 or G80/G85 though, limiting you as it does to tapping the display to acquire focus and trigger the shutter, in addition to pinching to zoom when reviewing images; if you’re hoping to be able to toggle and adjust controls on the rear display you’ll be left disappointed.

Resolution receives a boost over the X-T10, increasing from 920k-dots to 1.04m-dots, matching that of the X-T2. Unlike the X-T2, the X-T20’s display doesn’t take advantage of Fuji’s double-jointed design, but the mechanism still allows you to pull the display outwards for waist-level shooting, and downwards should you want to use the camera raised aloft. 

The X-T20 also comes equipped with Fujifilm’s X-Processor Pro imaging engine, which sees it spring into life a little quicker than the X-T10 at 0.4 seconds, while the shutter lag has been reduced to 0.05 seconds.

There’s just a single SD card slot on the X-T20, compared to the X-T2’s two, while it doesn’t support UHS-II cards.

The X-T20 offers 4K video capture (3840 x 2160) at 30p as well as Full HD (1920 x 1080) at 60p, both of which support film simulations as well. There’s an input for a microphone, but not for audio monitoring.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Photography Editor

With over ten years experience writing about cameras and photography, Phil is TechRadar's Photography Editor, writing and overseeing reviews of the latest camera gear, as well as looking after the photography tutorials and techniques you see here.