Our Verdict

Despite the arrival of the D3400 in the Nikon DSLR line-up, the D3300 is still our pick of the entry-level DSLRs. Why? Simply put, it ticks a lot of boxes for first time users - the 24MP sensor delivers great images, it's easy to use, has an impressive battery life and is backed-up by an impressive array of lenses and accessories. Factor in the excellent value it is right now, and the D3300 is hard to beat.

For

  • High pixel count
  • No optical low-pass filter
  • Excellent Guide Mode
  • Easy to use

Against

  • Fixed LCD
  • Screen not touch-sensitive
  • Few direct controls
  • Limited connectivity options

• UPDATED: Key differences between the D3300 and D3400

The D3300 may have been replaced by the D3400, but that's no reason to discount this entry-level DSLR. In fact, while the D3400 costs a little bit more (though prices are continuing to fall), the D3300 is the better buy right now.

Despite the growing popularity of mirrorless cameras, the entry-level DSLR market is still incredibly popular for those looking to take the next step in their photography journey.

Nikon's range of D3xxx models has proved incredibly popular over the years for new users looking to expand their creativity thanks to their blend of easy handling and solid performance, backed-up by an impressive range of lenses and accessories.

Features

  • APS-C CMOS sensor, 24.2MP
  • 3.0-inch screen, 921,000 dots
  • 1080p video capture

The D3300 features a high resolution 24.2MP APS-C sensor - pretty impressive when you consider the enthusiast-focused D7200 shares the same resolution and costs quite a bit more. 

Like the rest of the range, the D3300's sensor does away with the low-pass filter, which should mean even more detail is captured, resulting in even sharper images compared to previous models like the D3200.

In addition to this, the native sensitivity range runs from ISO100 to 12,800, and there's an expansion setting that takes it to the equivalent of ISO25,600, providing plenty of flexibility for a range of lighting situations.

Like the Nikon D5300, the D3300 sports Nikon's now second-generation processing engine, the EXPEED 4, allowing the D3300 to shoot continuously at a maximum rate of 5fps, while it can sustain this burst rate for up to 100 fine quality JPEGs. More than enough for most people's needs.

Nikon D3300

The EXPEED 4 processing engine is also responsible for allowing the D3300 to record Full HD movie footage at framerates up to 50p/60p and with continuous autofocus. Helpfully, there's a microphone port as well as a built-in stereo mic for better sound recording during movie shooting.

There are a host of Special Effects on tap, allowing you to jazz-up JPEG files and videos with a collection of styles. Nikon has boosted the list of effects to 13 for the D3300, and it now includes Pop, which increases colour saturation, Toy Camera, which creates a retro effect, and Easy Panorama. These effects can be previewed in real time on the LCD screen, so you can see exactly what you'll get once you trigger the shutter.

The D3300 has a dedicated 420-pixel RGB sensor to gather exposure, white balance and focus information to inform the Automatic Scene Recognition system. Meanwhile, there's an 11-point AF system that we've seen on a host of previous models, which has a central cross-type AF point for extra sensitivity.

It's a little unremarkable, especially when compared to some mirrorless rivals, but its a tried and test system.

Finally, although the D3300 uses the same battery as the D3200, we are told that the new processing engine allows the camera to be more efficient in its power consumption, and the battery is claimed to last for around 700 shots – we'll be keen to put that claim to the test during our review.