Best bridge camera: the top DSLR-style, superzoom cameras reviewed

Get a compact camera with DSLR styling and a huge zoom

Buying guide best bridge camera

Many predicted that bridge cameras would be wiped out by the rise of affordable DSLRs and compact system cameras, but the combination of immense optical zoom versatility and advanced features at an affordable price explains their enduring appeal.

The best bridge cameras now offer DSLR-like levels of control and fast, wide-aperture lenses, along with raw shooting and other useful extras such as Wi-Fi and articulated screens. Image quality didn't used to be a bridge camera forte, due to their widespread use of small 1/2.3-inch sensors. These days, however, there are models with much larger 1-inch designs that rival the image quality of some compact system cameras.

Panasonic FZ1000

1. Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

A 1-inch sensor and 4K video recording gives this bridge camera the edge

Sensor size: 1-inch CMOS | Megapixels: 20.1 | Zoom range: 16x, 25-400mm-equivalent | Screen type: 3-inch articulating, 921,000 dots | Viewfinder: Yes | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 12fps | Maximum video resolution: Ultra HD 2160p | User level: Enthusiast

1-inch sensor
Large maximum aperture
Screen not touch-sensitive
Comparatively large

The FZ1000's 16x optical zoom is lower than typical bridge cameras, but that's due to its sizeable 1-inch sensor that delivers a big boost in image quality. This isn't just any old lens, either, but rather a Leica optic with a large f/2.8 maximum wide-angle aperture that narrows to a still-respectable f/4 at full zoom. This helps you capture shots in low light without resorting to high ISO sensitivities, whilst the Hybrid 5-axis Optical Image Stabilisation minimises camera shake. 4K (Ultra HD, strictly) 3840 x 2160 video recording, advanced autofocusing, a superb 2,359,000-dot electronic viewfinder and raw shooting all help make the FZ1000 our top pick.

Read the full review: Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

Canon PowerShot G3 X

2. Canon G3 X

Canon introduces its big zoom, large sensor bridge camera

Sensor size: 1-inch CMOS | Megapixels: 20.2 | Zoom range: 25x, 24-600mm-equivalent f/2.8-5.6 | Monitor: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,620,000 dots | Viewfinder: No | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 5.9fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080p

1-inch sensor
Impressive focal range
No viewfinder
No 4k video or panorama mode

With its relatively large 1-inch sensor, this is Canon's answer to the Panasonic FZ1000. The G3 X adds more zoom versatility though, thanks to its 25x optic that gives a 24-600mm-equivalent focal range. On the downside, the maximum aperture drops to f/5.6 at full zoom and the G3 X doesn't have an electronic viewfinder. Canon has also fitted its premium Digic 6 image processor, though, and the 3.2-inch tilting touch-sensitive screen is top notch too, with a huge 1,620,000-dot resolution. The G3 X can shoot full HD but not 4K – you do get raw capture and image quality with plenty of detail, though noise can be intrusive above ISO 3200.

Read the full review: Canon G3 X

Sony RX10 II

3. Sony RX10 II

Sony's premium bridge camera has a heavy video slant and a price to match

Sensor: 1-inch, 20.2Mp | Lens: 24-200mm f/2.8 | Monitor: 3-inch 1,229K dots | Viewfinder: EVF |Continuous shooting: 14fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Enthusiast/expert

4K video and 14fps continuous shooting
1-inch sensor and f/2.8 lens
Short zoom range for a bridge camera
High-tech 4K makes it expensive

The RX10 II has the same 24-200m F/2.8 lens and 1-inch sensor combination as the original RX10, making it a premium quality bridge camera for those prepared to sacrifice ultimate zoom range in exchange for a better camera. The RX10 II, however, adds Sony's new 'stacked sensor' design for much faster data readout, 4K video and a 40x slow-motion mode. It's evolved into an impressively high-tech stills video camera, but while videographers will be interested, it's made it expensive compared to other bridge cameras for stills photographers – it's a great camera, but the high price limits its appeal.

Read the full review: Sony RX10 II

Canon SX60 HS

4. Canon PowerShot SX60 HS

This feature-packed bridge camera has a lot to offer to enthusiasts

Sensor size: 1/2.3-inch CMOS | Megapixels: 16.1 | Zoom range: 65x, 21-1365mm-equivalent | Screen type: 3-inch articulating, 922,000 dots | Viewfinder: Yes | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 6.4fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

65x zoom range
Full manual control and raw capability
No eye sensor on the viewfinder
Lacks touch-screen control

The SX60 HS is a more conventional bridge camera than our top trio, as it uses a smaller 1/2.3-inch sensor, enabling a huge 65x optical zoom range. It's still got full manual control, though, plus an articulated screen, a good quality electronic viewfinder and the ability to shoot in raw. Inbuilt Wi-Fi with NFC is another bonus. Annoyingly there's no eye sensor on the viewfinder, so you have to activate it manually. Image quality is very good, with bright and punchy colours, but it does struggle a little with very dark conditions and if you examine images at 100%, you'll see some speckling and noise.

Read the full review: Canon PowerShot SX60 HS

Nikon Coolpix P610

5. Nikon Coolpix P610

It may lack raw capability, but otherwise the P610 is a solidly-specced contender

Sensor size: 1/2.3-inch CMOS | Megapixels: 16.1 | Zoom range: 60x, 24-1440mm-equivalent | Screen type: 3-inch articulating, 921,000 dots | Viewfinder: Yes | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 7fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

60x optical zoom
Articulating screen & Wi-Fi
No raw format shooting
Screen not touch sensitive

Choosing between this and the Canon SX60 HS is tough, as both cameras perform similarly and the difference in zoom range is slight. The P610 just loses out on a place in our top three as it can't shoot raw images, but it does undercut the Canon on price. Image quality is high up to ISO 800, with great colour reproduction and reasonable detail, whilst low light shots look good up to ISO 1600. It's a pity there's no eye sensor for the viewfinder, but you do get Wi-Fi with NFC pairing, plus an articulating screen which is useful for composing shots from awkward angles.

Read the full review: Nikon Coolpix P610

Panasonic Lumix FZ72

6. Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ72

The FZ72 may be showing its age, but falling prices keep it in the game

Sensor size: 1/2.3-inch CMOS | Megapixels: 16.1 | Zoom range: 60x, 20-1200mm-equivalent | Screen type: 3-inch fixed, 460,000 dots | Viewfinder: Yes | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 9fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

60x zoom
Raw format shooting
No Wi-Fi or touch sensitivity
Small, low resolution EVF

The FZ72 is one of the cheapest bridge cameras in our selection, yet it still sports a great zoom range with an impressive 20mm-equivalent wide angle focal length. Its lens aperture also opens up as wide as f/2.8, though it does narrow to f/5.9 at full zoom. Raw format recording and full manual control give the FZ72 enthusiast appeal, as does the attractive image quality. We would rank the FZ72 higher, but there?s no Wi-Fi and the relatively low screen and electronic viewfinder resolutions are a let-down. You?ll also have to do without an eye sensor to automatically switch between the two displays.

Read the full review: Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ72

Sony HX400V

7. Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX400V

A great all-rounder that's just starting to be outclassed by newer rivals

Sensor size: 1/2.3-inch CMOS | Megapixels: 20.4 | Zoom range: 50x, 24-1200mm-equivalent | Screen type: 3-inch tilting, 922,000 dots | Viewfinder: Yes | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 10fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

High build quality
Wi-Fi, tilting screen
Can't shoot in raw
Low-resolution EVF

Sony's premium superzoom bridge camera is closely matched with the Panasonic FZ72, but it loses out due to its higher price, JPEG-only image capture and lesser zoom range. Still, the HX400V claws back some ground by offering Wi-Fi. It's also pleasure to use thanks to its ergonomic design and the tilting screen is another nice touch, though it won't fully articulate. But more disappointing is the relatively low resolution electronic viewfinder. Although there's no raw support, JPEG images have great colours and plenty of detail. Some image smoothing is visible at 100% image size, but it's a common trait amongst small sensor bridge cameras.

Read the full review: Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX400V

Sony HX300

8. Sony Cyber-shot HX300

It may be a poor man's HX400V, but is that such a bad thing?

Sensor size: 1/2.3-inch CMOS | Megapixels: 20.4 | Zoom range: 50x, 24-1200mm-equivalent | Screen type: 3-inch tilting, 922,000 dots | Viewfinder: Yes | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 10fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080p

Excellent image stabilisation
Lens barrel zoom ring
No Wi-Fi or GPS
No raw shooting

Can't stretch to Sony's HX400V? Stepping down to the HX300 still gets you the same 50x optical zoom and 20.4-megapixel Exmor R sensor with its respectable image quality and Full HD video recording. It's also just as robust as its sibling, and you're treated to manual controls which include a DSLR-like zoom ring around the lens barrel. You'll have to do without the HX400V's Wi-Fi connectivity, GPS location tagging and hotshoe mount, plus a few other minor features. But if you're just after a bridge camera that nails the basics and are happy to shoot in JPEG only, the HX300 ticks the right boxes.

Read the full review: Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX300

Fuji HS50

9. Fujifilm FinePix HS50 EXR

Fancy a bridge camera with the controls and quality feel of a DSLR?

Sensor size: 1/2-inch CMOS | Megapixels: 16 | Zoom range: 42x, 24-1000mm-equivalent | Screen type: 3-inch articulating, 920,000 dots | Viewfinder: Yes | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 11fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

Good OIS performance
Shoots in raw format
Image smoothing
No Wi-Fi

With 'only' a 42x zoom range, the HS50 is beaten by many other small-sensor rivals, but it feels more like an SLR thanks to its chunky size and traditional zoom ring around the lens barrel. The HS50 shoots in raw as well, which is somewhat rare at this level. It also boasts an articulating screen and an eye sensor for the excellent electronic viewfinder, however there's no Wi-Fi. Autofocusing is first class and image quality is pretty good, but detail smoothing is visible when viewing photos at full size and the HS50 scores much lower than the Sony HX400V and Panasonic FZ72 in our lab tests.

Read the full review: Fujifilm FinePix HS50 EXR

Nikon Coolpix P900

10. Nikon Coolpix P900

Unleash your inner paparazzo with the P900's class-leading 83x optical zoom

Sensor size: 1/2.3-inch CMOS | Megapixels: 16 | Zoom range: 83x, 24-2000mm-equivalent | Screen type: 3-inch articulating, 921,000 dots | Viewfinder: Yes | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 7fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080p | User level: Enthusiast

Class-leading zoom range
Inbuilt Wi-Fi and NFC
No raw shooting
Big and expensive

Thought Canon's 65x SX60 HS was the limit for optical zoom range? Well Nikon has rewritten the rule book, as the P900's incredible 83x lens currently gives it the accolade of world's longest-zoom bridge camera. Such a massive lens does make this one hefty snapper, however. It's considerably larger than Nikon's P610 and 60% heavier, yet it shares many of the same features, like Wi-Fi with NFC pairing and an articulating screen. Image quality is also very similar to that of the P610, but the price certainly isn't. The P900 will cost you around 80% more, which is hard to justify.

Read the full review: Nikon Coolpix P900