LG 55lx9900 angle

The 55LX9900 proves definitively that innovation and ambition are not only alive and well, but thriving in LG's R&D department. It really isn't overstating the case to say that it's arguably the definitive high-tech TV of its generation, which is no mean feat when you consider just how quickly things are changing in this area at the moment.

Obviously, such high levels of innovation come at a steep price, but at least LG has managed to deliver mostly excellent picture quality to accompany the 55LX9900's enormous feature count and ground-breaking aesthetics. It's just a pity that the crosstalk issues diminish the mostly good 3D playback.

We liked

The TV looks absolutely sensational, with its tiny border and svelte profile looking almost miraculous given the huge expanse of screen they support.

The set is also packed with connections and multimedia talents, including an optional wireless AV transmission system.

We also found the TV remarkably easy to use for such a feature-laden model, and really enjoyed the intriguing Magic Remote control option. Best of all, the 55LX9900 is capable of producing some really sensational big-screen picture quality, with clear, smooth motion; rich colours; high brightness levels; good black levels; and lots of sharpness and detailing.

We disliked

Although the 55LX9900 is very easy to use for a TV packed with innovation, features and options, you do have to take a little care with the picture setup in order to get the best out of the TV. You can definitely drastically reduce the picture's appearance if you get a few key tools set badly.

It's a pity some of the set's connections stick straight out, rather than resting at right angles to the screen and also that the mostly impressive picture quality is affected by crosstalk noise with 3D material, and extensive haloing and contrast loss during off-axis viewing.

Final verdict

The 55LX9900 represents the state of the TV art, and LG should be justly proud of what it has achieved with the set. In fact, if you're after a truly luxurious and profoundly talented 2D TV, it hits the spot completely, finally destroying LG's image as a budget-only brand.

Its only significant problem is that it suffers from the widespread crosstalk noise problem with 3D, thus leaving us with no choice but to suggest that anyone really keen on 3D might be better off with one of Panasonic's VT20 plasmas.

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