Professor announces 'Facebook friends' fallacy

Got more than 150? Then they are not your friends

A researcher at Oxford University has deemed the amount of friends you have on Facebook is not actually that reflective to your friend group in real life.

Robin Dunbar, Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, has noted that the brain can't actually handle much more then 150 friends, so having thousands of 'trophy' friends on their social network seems to be a pretty meaningless exercise.

150 isn't just a number plucked out of the ether but one which is all part of something called Dunbar's number – an idea developed in the 1990s which is based on how much information the part of the brain used for conscious thought can actually contain.

Like the kudos

"The interesting thing is that you can have 1,500 friends but when you actually look at traffic on sites, you see people maintain the same inner circle of around 150 people that we observe in the real world," explained Dunbar about his findings.

"People obviously like the kudos of having hundreds of friends but the reality is that they're unlikely to be bigger than anyone else's."

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