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Your Android TV will soon have the best features of Chromecast with Google TV

The new Android TV interface
(Image credit: Google)

Android TV is in for another big update, Google announced today. On the docket this week are two of Google TV’s best features: recommendations and the watchlist. 

Available first on the Chromecast with Google TV, recommendations use Google’s algorithm to show you TV shows and movies you might want to watch based on previous ratings. You can tweak the algorithm at any time by going in and rating more films but we got a nice mix of Marvel movies and sci-fi just by watching and rating the Marvel movies in order.

The other new feature is the watchlist that allows you to add films and movies you find while browsing the interface to a single row of the home page. This helps you keep track of content you’ve been meaning to watch but haven’t found the time yet, and adding a show or movie to the list is as simple as clicking on the card and clicking “add to watchlist”.

So how soon will we see the features? Well, according to Google, you’ll start to see these new features on your Android TV beginning this week.  

Android TV vs Google TV: what’s the difference? 

Last year when we first got our hands on the Chromecast with Google TV, there was a huge difference between it and the long-running Android TV that’s powered smart TVs and streaming devices like the Nvidia Shield for the last half-decade. 

Of the two, Google TV was a lot slicker with lots of shows and movies on the home page, while Android TV sorted itself into rows based on streaming services. 

Now, however, there’s not a big difference between the two. Android TV got a user interface redesign earlier this year that makes it look similar to Google TV, and now it’s getting Google TV’s two best features, too. 

The good news for you? If you’re an Android TV owner you’re soon going to have all the benefits of a Chromecast with Google TV without having to pay for the dongle. 

Nick Pino

Nick Pino is the senior home entertainment editor at TechRadar and covers TVs, headphones, speakers, video games, VR and streaming devices. He also has a degree in computer science he's not using if anyone wants it.