Google has announced that Android 2.3.3 is currently being rolled out to Google Nexus One and Google Nexus S handsets.

Still known as Gingerbread, the incremental update for the Nexus S is a bigger deal for the Nexus One which now gets to catch up to its newer, Samsung-made brother.

The over the air update also brings more NFC functionality to the Nexus S, including the ability to work with Bluetooth to share connections without requiring any manual sharing.

Mobile payments, here we come

The update also see NFC-enabled handsets like the Google Nexus S able to write NFC tags as well as read them – this means the handset could feasibly be used to make mobile payments or swipe Oyster readers once the networks accept them.

Another benefit of Android 2.3.3 is that it should fix the Nexus S reboot issue that has been haranguing some users.

Facebook contacts also get a spring clean in 2.3.3, with the update clearing all of Facebook's stored contact details out from the handset's contacts.

Facebook had previously had special dispensation to allow contact information to be stored in the cloud and displayed in the address book, while most apps have to use Android's contacts API. Google is now revoking that allowance in the name of "true data liberation".

Free our data

A statement from Google says, "For Nexus S users who downloaded the Facebook app from Android Market, Facebook contacts will no longer appear to be integrated with the Android Contacts app.

"Since Facebook contacts cannot be exported from the device, the appearance of integration created a false sense of data portability.

"Facebook contact data will continue to appear within the Facebook app.Like all developers on Android, Facebook is free to use the Android contacts API to truly integrate contacts on the device, which would allow users to have more control over their data.

"We are removing the special-case handling of Facebook contacts on Nexus S and future lead devices. We continue to believe that reciprocity (the expectation that if information can be imported into a service it should be able to be exported) is an important step toward creating a world of true data liberation -- and encourage other websites and app developers to allow users to export their contacts as well."

Via Engadget