Samsung and Microsoft Copilot are coming together on the new Galaxy Book4 to take on Apple

GalaxyBook4
(Image credit: Samsung)

Samsung, in collaboration with Microsoft, is planning to bring a new level of connectivity between your PC and smartphone similar to the way iPhone users can multitask easily between Apple devices - all thanks to artificial intelligence.

Think about the Apple ecosystem - with each Apple device you add to your life, you can send messages, take calls, edit photos and more no matter if you're using your iPhone, iPad, MacBook or almost any Apple device. You’re not stuck having to pick your phone up every few minutes. This is basically what Samsung and Microsoft are hoping to achieve with the new Galaxy Book4 laptop.

Using the Microsoft Copilot AI assistant you’ll be able to find, read and summarize text messages from your Samsung Galaxy smartphone on your PC and either write or generate responses and send them on your behalf directly from the Galaxy Book 4. 

Again, to put it in perspective consider quickly opening the iMessage app on your MacBook and responding to a friend, but now having the option to generate a quick message using Copilot instead of typing up your own. I can’t think of any situation where I would want an AI to generate a response to a text rather than responding myself, but it could be helpful on work PCs that require more thought-out messages between colleagues. 

It’s good to see Samsung open up its ecosystem, even if it’s with the help of Microsoft Copilot. This is also a good opportunity for Microsoft to show off just how naturally a tool like Copilot can fit into people’s lives - something it's so far struggled to do.

GalaxyBook4

(Image credit: Samsuing)

As more laptop manufacturers embrace artificial intelligence to boost performance and make access to the feature easier, it's good to see Samsung embrace the new technology in a more interesting, more useful way. 

Considering how popular the Apple all-in-one ecosystem is, it’s likely that Samsung is envious of that kind of smooth connectivity, and would be trying to emulate it with the Galaxy Book4. 

In the same way you’re more likely to buy a MacBook if you already have an iPhone, or vice versa, Samsung is trying to encourage people to buy more of its products by offering a similar set-up between its devices. 

The main difference between the two is that Apple not only produces the hardware (the phones, the tablets, the laptops) but it produces the software as well. All Apple products run on its own operating systems, but Samsung however only produces the hardware - its phones run on Android, and its laptops run Windows 11.

Hopefully, when we do get our hands on the Galaxy Book4 we’ll be able to see how this collaboration between the two companies plays out, and if it’ll be as seamless as the all-in-one experience offered by Apple - or even better.

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Muskaan Saxena
Computing Staff Writer

Muskaan is TechRadar’s UK-based Computing writer. She has always been a passionate writer and has had her creative work published in several literary journals and magazines. Her debut into the writing world was a poem published in The Times of Zambia, on the subject of sunflowers and the insignificance of human existence in comparison.

Growing up in Zambia, Muskaan was fascinated with technology, especially computers, and she's joined TechRadar to write about the latest GPUs, laptops and recently anything AI related. If you've got questions, moral concerns or just an interest in anything ChatGPT or general AI, you're in the right place.

Muskaan also somehow managed to install a game on her work MacBook's Touch Bar, without the IT department finding out (yet).