Apago's PDF Shrink seeks to cut your PDFs down to size by optimising images and removing duplicated or unnecessary information.

By default, you have four configurations on offer – Email, iPhone, Print and Web. Dragging and dropping your PDF document onto one of these optimises it according to the settings you've chosen.

Each droplet lets you set a balance between shrinkage and quality, optimise your document according to what viewers will be used, and choose where to save and protect the document with a password. Advanced settings allow you to set print resolution and compression quality, remove unnecessary font data and more.

You can duplicate and rename droplets or set up new ones from scratch, allowing you to create processes for specific tasks. For example, you might want your PDFs web-optimised, renamed and saved to a specific folder, or apply shrinkage when emailing to an ancient PC with a dial-up internet connection. You can also set a default droplet for when you drag and drop files onto the application icon.

Decent compression

Dropping a folder full of PDFs onto the default email droplet shrank a text-only ebook from 4MB to 1.8MB, with a visuals-heavy leaflet going from 2.4MB to 224kb. Using the default print droplet, the book reached 2MB, while the leaflet remained at 2.4MB. The quality of the PDFs was perfectly satisfactory.

The export options in PDF Shrink offer versatility, but the means to transfer a squashed PDF to your iPhone after processing is lacking, and maybe at US$35 it's a tad expensive, but it's definitely worth a look for those who work with PDFs frequently.