This new interconnect is marketed partly on the strength of its low 'microphonic distortion'. Microphony in cables is not a new concern, but Black Rhodium claims to have reduced it to lower levels than usual thanks to some confidential technique.

It's true that if this cable is connected to an amp input, with the other end left unconnected, and whacked, very little noise comes out - less than with plenty of (but not all) other cables we've tried, but as usual there's probably more to it than that.

The use of PTFE insulation, silver-plated conductors and simple coaxial construction is a well-established formula for good cable performance, and the twisting together of the pair can only help reduce hum pickup. Highly flexible, it is terminated in good-quality phono plugs with a split centre pin for extra grip.

The sound of this cable is good in many different ways. The bass is strong, clear and tuneful, while there's no obvious sign of any tonal imbalance in the all-important midband. Perhaps if one is to be ultra-fussy, the 'presence' band (upper midrange) is lifted and the sound has a 'fast' character as a result, but this is really very mild.

Treble is on the dry side, we felt, closing in the acoustic space around instruments in the finest recordings, but on the whole we'd expect to pay more than £80 to improve on that. In line with this finding, detail stops just short of truly excellent, but imaging is precise and deep.