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Rode’s new mini USB microphone is here to take on the Yeti Nano

Rode NT-USB Mini
(Image credit: Rode)

Update: Rode has released an updated, premium prfoessional studio arm – the PSA1+ – which retails for $129 / £114 / AU$199. It's compatible with any microphone weighing between 94g and 1.2kg, including the NT-USB Mini and offers clever shock-absorbing tricks to reduce any unwanted desk vibrations and sounds.

While the Blue Yeti USB microphone and its more compact Nano successor have been the go-to for many podcasters, Rode is hoping its latest NT-USB Mini will steal their thunder.

Priced at $99 (£99, AU$149), the NT-USB Mini costs the same as the Yeti Nano and offers much the same proposition – take a successful USB microphone and shrink it down, condensing controls and maintaining audio quality in the process.

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Rode NT-USB Mini

(Image credit: Rode)
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Rode NT-USB Mini

(Image credit: Rode)

The interface on this little Rode mic is incredibly minimal, with a single dial that adjusts headphone level found on the front, and a USB-C and 3.5mm headphone port found on the rear.

The desktop stand is weighted and is designed to absorb any shocks from a bumped desk. It’s attached magnetically to a 360-degree swivelling mount for the microphone, so you can quickly detach it and mount it on a mic stand or studio arm.

Outside of the company’s reputation for professional, studio-grade audio quality, one of Rode’s standout features is the simplicity in which its microphones interface with other gear. The NT-USB Mini is class-compliant, meaning it will work immediately with any computer or tablet when hooked up via USB, with no drivers, firmware or apps required.

The NT-USB Mini features an integrated pop filter and is constructed from “hard-wearing steel and reinforced nylon resin”, so it should be compact and rugged enough for grab-and-go situations.

The Rode NT-USB Mini is available now in the US for $99 with other region’s availability and pricing to follow.

Harry Domanski
Harry is an Australian Journalist for TechRadar with an ear to the ground for future tech, and the other in front of a vintage amplifier. He likes stories told in charming ways, and content consumed through massive screens. He also likes to get his hands dirty with the ethics of the tech.