Linksys has used this distinctive router casing in a number of models and we saw it a few months back in the WRT300N. Thankfully, the colours have been toned down, so the casing is black with silver trim. However, we found that Linksys still uses its garish mix of black and purple in the configuration screen.

The router can sit flat with the array of aerials running down one side or you can stand it vertically, in which case it looks like a piece of military hardware.

Previous Linksys routers have had an anonymous button on the top, but on this model the button is covered by a sticker that says 'Reserved', so it would seem that someone at Linksys has a cunning plan that may eventually swing into action.

Check Compatibility

This is version 2 of the WRT350N, which denotes a shift from Broadcom silicon to Atheros. This could be significant if you are kitting out your office and want to ensure your hardware is compatible with existing routers and access points.

Despite the update, we noted the WPC300N PC Card carries a sticker that says it was manufactured in July 2006, while the router dates from May 2007.

On the back of the router, next to the Gigabit WAN connections, there's a USB 2.0 port that earns the WRT350N its description as a Wireless-N Gigabit Router with Storage Link. The idea is you plug in a USB hard drive or memory key to act as network-attached storage. It works well enough, but we're not too sure how useful it is to share files in this manner.

The Linksys wireless connection utility is basic, but it shows the available networks, the type of security they're using and the MAC address of the router. Both the connection utility and router configuration screen look similar to those from D-Link, although we prefer the look and feel of the Linksys. Overall, this is a basic but user-friendly product.