Like its Galaxy S4 cousin, the forthcoming Samsung Galaxy Note 3 will arrive in eight-core and quad-core flavours, according to leaked documents which appeared online on today.

Pages that have reportedly come direct from the device's user manual, courtesy of SIM Only Radar, showcase sketches of the device along with a list of top-line specs, including the two processor breeds.

However, let's remember that this is a site that doesn't have a long history of such leaks, is publishing a manual with a spelling mistake in the specs (unless Andriod is now a thing) and it's hardly a shocker to think the Note 3 will deviate from the Galaxy S4 path.

It also promises a xenon flash, which seems highly unlikely given the phone's super slim dimensions - although thinner units have been developed to allow for 'proper' photography on phones.

There's also nothing in the sketches beyond familiar design language, but the Enynos 5 Octa (ARM A15, ARM A7) SoC is listed alongside the quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 800, clocked at 2.3GHz.

While that potentially great news for those keeping tabs on the handset, it's unlikely that would-be Note 3 buyers will have any control over which version of the device they're able to pick up.

After announcing the Galaxy S4 with the eight-core chip back in April, the Koreans pulled the rug out from under Americans, Brits and Aussies, by only launching a quad-core variant in those territories.

Exynos new or old?

Today's official announcement that a brand new Exynos Octa 5 will be revealed next week also thickens the plot somewhat.

Will Samsung pack this new 'enhanced' and 'more powerful' version of the processor into the Note 3? And does it have enough of them available to ship globally?

Other specs outed within today's supposedly leaked document backs up much of what we've already learned about the S4.

It lists a 5.7-inch Super AMOLED display, 13-megapixel camera and Android Jelly Bean. The device itself is thought to be making its official bow on the eve of the annual IFA tech show in Berlin on September 4.

Via UnwiredView