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EE's customer service isn't great, so it's bringing it back to Britain

EE's customer service isn't great, so it's bringing it back to Britain
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EE's latest assault on the mobile market doesn't come in the form of a new phone or tuned-up tariff – instead it's taken a step back, looked at itself in the mirror and asked 'how can I improve?'

In fact, it's turned to customers and asked them about their biggest gripes, with customer service and coverage black spots proving to be the most common issues.

To meet the demands of its users, EE has confirmed that it's moving all of its customer service operations back to the UK and Ireland, killing off remote call centres in other parts of the world.

The shift back home is expected to be completed by the end of the year, and EE says it's making an investment in running customer service from the UK which should hopefully mean no price rises for those currently using the network.

Take cover(age)!

The network is also waging war on coverage black spots (or 'notspots', as EE likes to call them) in the UK, and has committed to covering 95% of the total landmass (99.8% of the population) with 4G signal by the end of 2020.

Currently EE's 4G network only covers 60% of the UK landmass, and it claims it'll reach 92% by the end of 2017, which would be a massive leap.

It's even investing in bringing coverage underground and into tunnels, hopefully keeping connections continuous on long drives and train journeys. Things kick off this week, with EE switching on its network in the Channel Islands, Shetlands and Isles of Scilly.

John McCann
Global Managing Editor

John joined TechRadar over a decade ago as Staff Writer for Phones, and over the years has built up a vast knowledge of the tech industry. He's interviewed CEOs from some of the world's biggest tech firms, visited their HQs and has appeared on live TV and radio, including Sky News, BBC News, BBC World News, Al Jazeera, LBC and BBC Radio 4. Originally specializing in phones, tablets and wearables, John is now TechRadar's resident automotive expert, reviewing the latest and greatest EVs and PHEVs on the market. John also looks after the day-to-day running of the site.